Alfred Hitchcocks North By Northwest Essays, Book Reports, Term Papers

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Alfred Hitchcocks North by Northwest Alfred Hitchcock’s North by Northwest This movie was pretty interesting. At first, I didn’t look forward to completing this assignment, but once I started watching, I was very interested. The dialogue was clever, but the music was a little bold. I would say it was cheesy but that probably isn’t the way to say it artistically. I noticed there were strong beats and drums for climatic and intense parts such as the fight scenes. Softer music for the calm, don’t-worry-everything-is-safe scenes. I think sound played a major part in the scene were Robert Thornhill(Cary Grant) is out in the field waiting for Mr. Caplin. Waiting for the sound of the cars to get louder, which means they are close brings impatience. And then when the plane comes into the scene, the increasing sound is not desired because we know it’s after our hero. It’s one of those scenes where you don’t know what the hero should do since he’s incredibly vulnerable all out in the open with virtually no where to hide. Also, that scene is important because it makes the love interest, Ms. Eve Campbell(Eva Marie Saint), look like an accomplice to murder

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