Alice Paul

This essay has a total of 871 words and 23 pages.

Alice Paul


Alice Paul was born on January 11,1885,



in Moorestown, New Jersey. Her father, who



died when Alice was sixteen, was a businessman,



banker, and property owner. The Pauls lived in the



small Quaker community of Moorestown. One of



the beliefs of the Quakers was equality of the sexes.



As a young girl, Alice attended the Quaker suffrage



meetings with her mother.



Alice Pauls' father left them enough



money so she could attend the exclusive Swarthmore



College in Pennsylvania. She graduated in 1905 as



a biology major, but after discovering politics in her



senior year, she went on to attend the New York



School of Philanthropy. She majored in sociology,



and spent all of her spare time working for the



woman suffrage in New York.



In 1907, Paul earned a master's degree



in sociolgy. She went to England to continue her



work toward her doctorate degree. She was begin-



ning to realize that she couldn't change the



situation by social work alone, but needed to



change the actual laws. Women had no voice in



either England or America to change any law.



The suffrage movement was different



in England than in the States. British suffragists



had begun wild women protests in 1905. They



would sneak into male political meetings, and



disrupt the meetings by shouting questions, wave



banners and be arrested.



As Alice Paul became more involved



with the Women's Social and Political Union, she



was warned of possible imprisonment. This threat



did not prevent her from sneaking into political



events. She was arrested ten times in England,



three of which ended in prison time. While in



prison, she continued to protest the government's



refusal to let women vote or speak publicly, by



not eating. She was force-fed for four weeks.



She returned to America in 1910, where



she continued her studies and her suffrage work.



She brought back from England with her the same



tactics used to get the attention of the newspapers



and the government. She brought the wild suffragette



movement back to the United States.



She teamed up with Lucy Burns, who



she spent prison time with in England. They went



to the National American Women Suffrage



Association and proposed forming a committee to



lobby congressmen for a national suffrage



ammendment. They were named president and



vice president but were told they would have to



raise their own funds.



They began by organizing a volunteer



network then decided to bid for national attention.



Their first appearance as a committee was a



celebration parade for the inauguration of President



Woodrow Wilson. This would certainly be heard



throughout the nation. In just a few weeks they



had over 8,000 marchers representing states, colleges,



and even some other nations. They included 26 floats



Continues for 12 more pages >>




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