Alzheimers Compare and Constrast Essay

This essay has a total of 1480 words and 6 pages.

Alzheimers

Alzheimer's disease is described as a progressive brain disorder that gradually destroys a
person's memory and clarity to learn, reason, make judgments, communicate, and carry out
daily life. (r.1) Alzheimer's is a disturbing disease affecting millions of elderly
people. A person's risk for the disease is fifty-percent when they reach the age of
eighty-five.(r.1) Scientists have been studying the disease for many years now in hope to
find answers to a cure for this depressive disease. The disease is persistently being
studied with the hope of cures, and a better understanding of how one person can conquer
Alzheimer's disease.

Alzheimer's disease contains no known single cause. Scientists are patiently and
determinedly studying every aspect of the disease in hope to establish a precise cause.
Late-onset Alzheimer's cause relates to the increasing age of an individual and the family
history of the disease. (r.1) Statistics exemplify the discovery of one specific gene
which contributes to the increasing rate of late-onset Alzheimer's. Person's with rare,
familial types of Alzheimer's are found connected to hundreds of families linked to a
specific gene. (r.1) Those whom inherit the specific gene are almost guaranteed to obtain
the Alzheimer's disease. The gene also will affect the person by the age of sixty-five,
and even as early as their thirties and forties.(r.1) Another popular theory for the cause
of the disease other then genetics includes the decreasing of brains cells through either
strokes or ageing. Beth Miller, an Alzheimer's Association representative stated," Persons
may develop a miniature stroke where they may not even notice they are experiencing a
stroke, but their brain cell count decreases. Too many of these miniature strokes can
cause memory loss and result in Alzheimer's."(r.2)

Beth explained that as [one] ages [your] brain cells begin to die off, causing permanent
damage. [She] also stressed the fact that scientists have not concluded a specific cause
for the Alzheimer's disease, and they're hoping with the development of new technology we
may finally determine a single cause. (r.2)

Alzheimer's disease is a progressive form of dementia that gradually destroys their
memory, cognitive ability, and ability to fend for themselves.(r.3) Symptoms for
Alzheimer's disease are long and complex. Many people mistake the symptoms for Alzheimer's
disease for old age. The first sign is memory loss. The most common signs of Alzheimer's
are forgetting recently learned information. The second symptom is difficulty performing
familiar tasks. People begin to find it difficult to perform and complete everyday tasks
that were once easy, such as cooking a meal or participating in a hobby. The next sign is
problems with their language. Those with Alzheimer's disease forget the simplest of words
and begin to substitute words which do not make sense to the common listener. Their
writing skills also begin to lack. The fourth sign is disorientation to time and place.
Many become lost on their own street. They begin to loose their way and can sometimes
become very lost. The fifth sign is poor or decreased judgment. A person with Alzheimer's
begins to dress without any regard to the weather, or wear abnormal clothing. Next they
begin to think abstractly. They may forget to do their taxes, to balance their check
books, or other tasks that require a little use of thinking. Then they begin to misplace
objects, beginning with little items such as their car keys, but then progressing to
forgetting where they parked their car, where they put their jewelry and other important
items. Those with the disease contain rapid mood swings and their personalities begin to
alter dramatically. The last sign is loss of initiative. Researchers show that they begin
to watch television for hours, and sleep more then normal. They begin to loose interest in
things they once loved. (r.1)

There are seven main stages of the disease. It begins with no cognitive impairment, then
to very mild cognitive decline, to mild cognitive decline, to moderate cognitive decline,
to moderately severe cognitive decline, to severe cognitive decline, and finally to very
severe cognitive decline. This is the latest stage where they begin to become apart of the
disease Dementia. (r.4) The impairments are extreme and the stages can range for a long
period of time or for very little. Research describes the symptoms as easy to establish
and extremely noticeable once past the first three stages.

The diagnosis for the disease is correct eighty to ninety-percent of the time.(r.5)
Scientist have discovered a method to find out whether there are plaques and tangles in
the brain through the use of a microscope. The method can be scary and risky to remove
brain tissue while a person is alive. Doctors cannot look at the tissue until they do an
autopsy of the body, which can only occur after the death of the individual.(r.5) Many
doctors declare a person with Alzheimer's disease only through the symptoms. Blood tests
Continues for 3 more pages >>




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