Analysis Of Emily Dickensons C Essay

This essay has a total of 492 words and 3 pages.

Analysis Of Emily Dickensons C


Analysis of 'Crumbling is not an instant's Act';
by Emily Dickinson

"Crumbling is not an instant's Act'; is a lyric by Emily Dickinson. It tells how crumbling
does not happen instantaneously; it is a gradual process occurring slowly and cumulatively
over time.

The structure of this poem is complex and it tied directly into the figurative meaning.
This poem consists of three quatrains written in iamic meter but with no set number of
feet per line. Also, the second and fourth lines of each quatrain thyme somewhat. Perhaps
the most perplexing attribute of the structure is that Dickinson capitalizes words in
mid-sentence that would not normally be capitalized. This could represent decaying
objects; capitalized words represent things still standing and lowercase words represent
things decayed. This poem is choppy at timed, but it flows smoothly at others. Long
hyphens throughout the poem slow down reading speed. This could be compared to the rate of
decay. Sometimes decay is rapid, sometimes it is slow. the last three parts of the poem's
structure help create its figurative meaning.

Imagery is Dickinson's main figurative tool in this poem. the idea that crumbling is
progressive is supported by the last two lines of the first stanza, which state,
Continues for 2 more pages >>




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