Essay on Ancient Greece

This essay has a total of 829 words and 5 pages.

Ancient Greece

Ancient Greece

Greece

The Greek peninsula has been culturally linked with the Aegean Islands,
and the west coast of Asia Minor since the Neolithic Age. The numerous natural
harbors and close-lying islands lead to a unified, maritime civilization.
However cultural unity did not produce political unity. Mountain ranges and
deep valleys separated the peninsula into small economic and political units.
Constant feuding between cities and surrounding empires for political power made
Greece the sight of many battles.

Prehistoric Period

Archeological evidence shows that a primitive Mediterranean people,
closely related to races of northern Africa, lived in the southern Aegean area
as far back as the Neolithic Age. A cultural progression from the Stone Age to
the Bronze Age started about 3000 BC. This civilization, during the Bronze Age
was divided into two main cultures. One on these, called Cretan or Minoan was
centered on the island of Crete. The other culture, Helladic (who became
Mycenaean) populated mainland Greece. The Minoan culture dominated trade until
1500 BC when the Mycenaeans took control.
During the third millennium BC a series of invasions from the north
began. The most prominent of the early invaders, who were called the Achaeans,
had, in all probability, been forced to migrate by other invaders. They overran
southern Greece and established themselves on the Peloponnesus. Many other,
vaguely defined tribes, were assimilated in the Helladic culture.

Ancient Greece

Gradually, in the last period of Bronze Age Greece, the Minoan
civilization fused with the mainland. By 1400 BC the Achaeans were in
possession of the island itself, and soon afterward gained control of the
mainland. The Trojan War, described by Homer in the Iliad, began about 1200 BC
and was probably one of a series of wars waged during the 12th and 13th
centuries BC. It may have been connected with the last and most important of
the invasions which happened at about the same time and brought the Iron Age to
Greece. The Dorians left the mountains of Epirus and pushed their way down to
Peloponnesus and Crete, using iron weapons to conquer the people of those
regions. The Invading Dorians overthrew Achaean kings and settled in the
southern and eastern part of the peninsula.

The Hellenic Period
Continues for 3 more pages >>




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