Another Jd Salinger

This essay has a total of 1178 words and 15 pages.

Another Jd Salinger


J.D. Salinger's youth and war experiences influenced his

writings. J.D. went through four different schools for

education. He then went to World War II. After the war, he

had a lot to say, so he wrote down his thoughts. And, he

sure had some things to say.



Jerome David Salinger came into this world on January 1,

1919. J.D. was short for Jerome David. Jerome David went

by J.D. when he was young and he never let go of the name

as he got older. J.D. was born in New York City, New

York (Ryan 2581).



J.D. Salinger's parents were Sol and Miriam Salinger (Ryan

2581). His father, Sol Salinger, was born in Cleveland,

Ohio, and is said to have been the son of a rabbi. However,

Sol drifted far from orthodox Judaism to become an

importer of hams.



Sol married a Scotch-Irish lady (French 21). The lady's

name was Marie Jillich. She changed her name to Miriam to

fit into her husband's family (French 21).



Jerome David had a roller coaster marriage record. He was

allegedly married to a French physician in 1945 and

divorced her in 1947 (Ryan 2581). But other sources say

that Salinger has never admitted this marriage and the

records of the Florida Bureau of Vital Statistics fail to

indicate that a divorce was granted in that state in 1947 to

Jerome David Salinger (French 26).



He then married Claire Douglas on February 17, 1955.

Claire Douglas was a Radcliff graduate born in England. In

1955, the two of them settled down in Cornish, New

Hampshire, where they raised two children (Unger 552).

J.D. divorced Claire Douglas in October 1967 in Newport,

New Hampshire (Ryan 2581).



In 1932, the time J.D. should have begun high school, he

was transferred to a private institution, Manhattan's

McBurney School. There, J.D. told the interviewer that he

was interested in dramatics; but J.D. reportedly flunked out

within a year (French 22).



In September 1934, his father enrolled him at Valley Forge

Military Academy in Pennsylvania (French 22). In 1935,

while attending Valley Forge, J.D. was the literary editor of

Crossed Sabers, the Academy Yearbook. Salinger's grades

at Valley Forge were satisfactory. His marks in English

varied from 75 to 92. His final grades were: English 88,

French 88, German 76, History 79, and Dramatics 88. As

recorded in J.D.'s Valley Forge file, his I.Q. was 115. While

such scores as J.D.'s must be treated with caution, this one

and another one of 111 that he made when tested in New

York are strong evidence that he was slightly above the

average in intelligence, but far from the "genius" category. At

Valley Forge, Salinger belonged to the Glee Club, the

Aviation Club, the French Club, the Non-Commissioned

Officer's Club, and Mask and Spur (a dramatic

organization) (French 22). While at Valley Forge, Salinger

began writing short stories, working by flashlight under his

blankets after official "lights out" (French 23). In June of

1936, J.D. graduated from Valley Forge Military Academy

(French #2 15).



In 1937, Salinger attended the summer session at New

York University. He attended the Washington Square

College campus of New York University. There is little

documented about J.D.'s attendance at New York

University. Shirley Blaney, a high school student, and the

only person in the world to ever interview J.D. Salinger, said

that it appears unlikely that Salinger attended New York

University for two years (French 23).



In 1939, Salinger returned to New York after traveling to

Vienna and Poland for a year, to enroll in Whit Burnett's

famous course in short-story writing at Columbia University.

Continues for 8 more pages >>




  • Student
    student Societies Influence Upon Humanity Rejection is the key to self-destruction. Rejection of an individual could possibly cause the mental deterioration (nervous breakdown) of that individual due to the repudiation of society. Ostracization is not always induced by the physical appearance of a person but is sometimes caused by a character flaw. In both J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye and E.L. Doctorow’s Ragtime the main characters, Holden and Evelyn, feel rejected by society and in is
  • The Catcher in The Rye
    The Catcher in The Rye The Catcher in the Rye In J.D. Salinger\'s The Catcher in the Rye, the first person narration is critical in helping the reader to know and understand the main character, Holden Caulfield. Holden, in his narration, relates a flashback of a significant period of his life, three days and nights on his own in New York City. Through his narration, Holden discloses to the reader his innermost thoughts and feelings. He thus provides the reader not only with information of what o
  • Catcher in The Rye
    Catcher in The Rye Catcher In The Rye Holden Caulfield is teen angst bull-crap with a pickax. He\'s sarcastic, nasty, and completely unlikeable. He also doesn\'t give a crap. He is every teenager caught between the crapy little games of high school ("you\'re supposed to kill yourself if the football team loses or something") and the fear of adulthood ("going to get an office job and make a lot of money like the rest of the phonies"). The greatness in Holden Caulfield is that what he has to say i
  • Catcher in the Rye Vs Huckleberry Finn
    Catcher in the Rye Vs Huckleberry Finn J. D. Salinger’s Catcher in the Rye Compared to Mark Twain’s Huckleberry Finn All famous American authors have written novels using a variety of characters, plots, and settings to illustrate important themes. Throughout literary history many of the same themes have been stressed in different novels. In J. D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye and Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, each author writes about the common theme of coming of age. The
  • Catcher in The Rye
    Catcher in The Rye Catcher In The Rye Holden Caulfield is teen angst bull-crap with a pickax. He\'s sarcastic, nasty, and completely unlikeable. He also doesn\'t give a crap. He is every teenager caught between the crapy little games of high school ("you\'re supposed to kill yourself if the football team loses or something") and the fear of adulthood ("going to get an office job and make a lot of money like the rest of the phonies"). The greatness in Holden Caulfield is that what he has to say i
  • Catcher in the rye2
    catcher in the rye2 The Catcher in The Rye Many people find that their dreams are unreachable. Holden Caulfield realizes this in J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye. As Holden tells his story, he recounts the events since leaving the Pencey School to his psychiatrist. At first, Holden sounds like a typical, misguided teenager, rebellious towards his parents, angry with his teachers, and flunking out of school. However, as his story progresses, it becomes clear that Holden is indeed motivated,
  • Catcher in The Rye
    Catcher in The Rye Catcher In The Rye Holden Caulfield is teen angst bull-crap with a pickax. He\'s sarcastic, nasty, and completely unlikeable. He also doesn\'t give a crap. He is every teenager caught between the crapy little games of high school ("you\'re supposed to kill yourself if the football team loses or something") and the fear of adulthood ("going to get an office job and make a lot of money like the rest of the phonies"). The greatness in Holden Caulfield is that what he has to say i
  • Catcher in The Rye
    Catcher in The Rye Catcher In The Rye Holden Caulfield is teen angst bull-crap with a pickax. He\'s sarcastic, nasty, and completely unlikeable. He also doesn\'t give a crap. He is every teenager caught between the crapy little games of high school ("you\'re supposed to kill yourself if the football team loses or something") and the fear of adulthood ("going to get an office job and make a lot of money like the rest of the phonies"). The greatness in Holden Caulfield is that what he has to say i
  • Catcher in the ryedoes voice matter
    Catcher in the ryedoes voice matter Does the Voice Matter? How important is the voice that tells a story? It seems almost trivial to claim that the same story can change because of the voice telling it to you. Does the voice and point of view of the narrator play a large enough role in a novel to change the attitude of the reader about the novel? J.D.. Salinger uses the dominant character of Holden Caulfield to be the first person narrator of his novel The Catcher in the Rye. The key to Holden’s
  • Cathcer in the Rye
    Cathcer in the Rye Analysis of the Catcher in the Rye In 1919 Jerome David Salinger was born to Sol and Miriam Jillich Salinger. This man would have a moderately normal childhood attending the private McBurney School in Manhattan, and afterwards the Valley Forge Military Academy in Pennsylvania, where he graduated in 1936. He then attended New York University for an unsuccessful summer session in short-story writing. This 20th century novelist would later come to be known as J. D. Salinger and w
  • Innocence Compassion and some Crazy Cliff
    Innocence Compassion and some Crazy Cliff A novel, which has gained literary recognition worldwide, scrutiny to the point of censorship and has established a following among adolescents, The Catcher in the Rye is in its entirety a unique connotation of the preservation of innocence and the pursuit of compassion. With certain elegance the writer J.D. Salinger, substantiates the growth and perils, which lie between childhood and adulthood. Embellishing the differentiation between innocence and squ
  • Loss Of Innocence
    Loss Of Innocence The Loss of Innocence Certain childhood experiences are missed out by some people because of mishaps early on in life. Any unfortunate event could cause the loss of innocence and make a child mature before his or her time. This event or experience would cause them to sacrifice their innocence. Many pieces of literature contain the loss of innocence as a theme. Examples of these would be The Scarlet Letter, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, and The Catcher in the Rye. The Scar
  • Symbols of holden caufield
    symbols of holden caufield Symbolism of Holden Caulfield In the novel The Catcher in the Rye, J.D. Salinger uses many symbols to describe or characterize Holden Caulfield. For example, Holden uses the word “phony” many times to describe other people, when in reality he himself is a phony. Another symbol that is used throughout the novel to characterize Holden is the hunting hat he had just purchased in New York City. The hat represents Holden’s awkwardness; it does not fit in with the environmen
  • The Catcher in the Rye
    The Catcher in the Rye The Catcher in the Rye by: J. D. Salinger In results of writing an essay which included, " ...Modern science would still like to know what the secret ingredients were that the Egyptians used when they wrapped up dead people so that their faces would not rot for innumerable centuries...", Holden Caulfield, the main character in the book, failed Pencey Prep, one of a long series of private schools which he attended. He was proud of the fact that he failed every subject excep
  • The Catcher in the Rye
    The Catcher in the Rye The Catcher in the Rye by: J. D. Salinger In results of writing an essay which included, " ...Modern science would still like to know what the secret ingredients were that the Egyptians used when they wrapped up dead people so that their faces would not rot for innumerable centuries...", Holden Caulfield, the main character in the book, failed Pencey Prep, one of a long series of private schools which he attended. He was proud of the fact that he failed every subject excep
  • The Catcher in the Rye
    The Catcher in the Rye The Catcher in the Rye by: J. D. Salinger In results of writing an essay which included, " ...Modern science would still like to know what the secret ingredients were that the Egyptians used when they wrapped up dead people so that their faces would not rot for innumerable centuries...", Holden Caulfield, the main character in the book, failed Pencey Prep, one of a long series of private schools which he attended. He was proud of the fact that he failed every subject excep
  • The Catcher in the Rye3
    The Catcher in the Rye3 The Catcher in the Rye “I swear to God I’m crazy. I admit it.” It is very easy to automatically assume that Holden Caulfield is crazy. It’s even a logical assumption since Caulfield himself admits to being crazy twice throughout the course of the book. However, calling Holden Caulfield crazy is almost the same as calling the majority of the human race crazy also. Holden Caulfield is just an adolescent trying to prevent himself from turning into what he despises the most,
  • The Catcher in the Rye
    The Catcher in the Rye The Catcher in the Rye by: J. D. Salinger In results of writing an essay which included, " ...Modern science would still like to know what the secret ingredients were that the Egyptians used when they wrapped up dead people so that their faces would not rot for innumerable centuries...", Holden Caulfield, the main character in the book, failed Pencey Prep, one of a long series of private schools which he attended. He was proud of the fact that he failed every subject excep
  • The Chamber
    The Chamber The Catcher in the Rye Author: J. D. Salinger In this book, the main character, Holden McField, tells the story about what happened during his Summer vacation. Holden is a sixteen-year-old boy who has flunked out of a private prep school. Because he is afraid that his parents would find out this fact, he goes to a hotel in Las Vegas instead of going home after he leaves school for Summer vacation. In Las Vegas, many things happen to him within a few weeks. For example, he goes to the
  • The Psychological Message of Catcher in the Rye
    The Psychological Message of Catcher in the Rye The Psychological Message of J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye A novel, like a movie, is a form of entertainment; however, some novels do a great deal more than entertain. Some pack an emphatic psychological message. An illustration of such a publication is Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. In addition, Ken Kasey’s One Flew Over the Cookoo’s Nest is a narrative with a comparable central theme. J. D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the
  • The Psychological Message of Catcher in the Rye1
    The Psychological Message of Catcher in the Rye1 The Psychological Message of J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye A novel, like a movie, is a form of entertainment; however, some novels do a great deal more than entertain. Some pack an emphatic psychological message. An illustration of such a publication is Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. In addition, Ken Kasey’s One Flew Over the Cookoo’s Nest is a narrative with a comparable central theme. J. D. Salinger’s The Catcher in th
  • Catcher in the Rye Thesis Paper
    Catcher in the Rye Thesis Paper The Catcher in the Rye J. D. Salinger The Catcher in the Rye is a story about a young man named Holden Caulfield and the experiences that he faces after being dismissed from school. This book contains a great deal of symbolism, but it can very easily be missed in its simple story line. The story line itself is very basic, and I do not feel that the plot is very well written. When taken the time to appreciate it, this book is without a doubt a classic. As was state
  • Analysis of Huckleberry Finn The Red badge of Cour
    Analysis of Huckleberry Finn The Red badge of Courage and The Catcher and the Rye Teenagers everywhere have experienced an emotional bond with the characters Huckleberry Fin, Henry Fleming, and Holden Caulfield while reading The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, The Red Badge of Courage, and The Catcher in the Rye. Huck’s adventure down the Mississippi, Henry’s challenging experience in the Civil War, and Holden’s weekend of self examination in New York City present various views of the transition
  • Bananafish
    Bananafish Just why did Seymour kill himself Picture walking into a hotel room and finding a man dead on a bed. Upon closer inspection it becomes obvious that he has supposedly taken his own life with the gun that lay beside him. In talking to his wife who was asleep on the bed next to him when this incident occurred, it is learned that he just walked in the door and shot himself late the previous night. Out of the many questions that could be asked from this story, I believe that it is probably
  • Boys Will Be Boys
    Boys Will Be Boys Bailey 1 Erica Bailey Period 1 Honors English 10 19 April 2000 Boys Will Be Boys Holden Caulfield, portrayed in the J.D. Salinger novel Catcher in the Rye as an adolescent struggling to find his own identity, possesses many characteristics that easily link him to the typical teenager living today. The fact that they book was written more than forty years ago clearly exemplifies the saying "boys will be boys…" no matter what period of time is taking place. Holden\'s actions are
  • Catch
    Catch Catcher in the Rye By: Matthew J. Previts E-mail: mjp8379@csi.com Holden Caulfied: Saint, Snob, or Somewhere In-between? Although J.D. Salinger has only one novel to his credit, that novel, The Catcher in the Rye, is recognized as an exceptional literary work. The key to the success of The Catcher in the Rye is the main character, Holden Caulfield. There are many different critics that view Holden in many different ways. Some believe Holden to be a conceited snob, while others see Holden a
  • CATCHER
    CATCHER Nikki Bumbacco Ms. Morris ENG 3A0 May 15,1999 Often in literature characters, through different experiences, undergo changes which enable them to grow. In the novel The Catcher in the Rye, the author J.D. Salinger portrays Holden as a confused adolecent. The author conveys Holden’s inner growth through specific incidents. When Holden is expelled from Pencey he grows and developes a new attitude towards his family. After meeting with a prostitute Holden becomes more mature when he realize
  • Catcher and the Rye
    Catcher and the Rye CATCHER IN THE RYE FINAL ESSAY “Loneliness” Ever felt like there needs to be someone there to talk to, cry with, fight with, or just need a hug from? Those feelings dwell from loneliness, something Holden Caulfield knows all about. Holden Caulfield, J.D. Salinger’s main character in the book The Catcher In the Rye, is young man on the verge of having a nervous breakdown. One contributor to this breakdown, is the loneliness that Holden experiences. His loneliness is apparent t
  • Catcher in the Rye and 1950s Television
    Catcher in the Rye and 1950s Television J.D. Salinger’s novel The Catcher in the Rye depicts life in the fifties as seen through the eyes of a disillusioned teenager. There is a vast difference between the life of a real 1950s family and that of a typical family portrayed through the television sitcoms of the day. The Catcher in the Rye is filled with examples that demonstrate how different real societies are. In the fifties, quaint and perfect families dominated television home-life. The mother
  • Catcher in the Rye Research Paper
    Catcher in the Rye Research Paper Innocence, Compassion, and some ‘Crazy’ Cliff A novel, which has gained literary recognition worldwide, scrutiny to the point of censorship and has established a following among adolescents, The Catcher in the Rye is in its entirety a unique connotation of the preservation of innocence and the pursuit of compassion. With certain elegance the writer J.D. Salinger, substantiates the growth and perils, which lie between childhood and adulthood. Embellishing the dif
  • Catcher in the Rye Theme
    Catcher in the Rye Theme J.D. Salinger uses Holden Caulfield’s anti-heroic characteristics to develop the theme of innocence and childhood. Holden is afraid of growing up and would prefer to remain an innocent child. He seems unable to face the responsibilities that come as one gets older. His continued flunking at school shows this. “They kicked me out. I wasn’t suppose to come back after Christmas vacation, on account of I was flunking four subjects and not applying myself at all.” (Page 4). S
  • Catcher in the Rye2
    Catcher in the Rye2 Holden Caulfied: Saint, Snob, or Somewhere In-between? Although J.D. Salinger has only one novel to his credit, that novel, The Catcher in the Rye, is recognized as an exceptional literary work. The key to the success of The Catcher in the Rye is the main character, Holden Caulfield. There are many different critics that view Holden in many different ways. Some believe Holden to be a conceited snob, while others see Holden as a Christ-like figure. It is my opinion, however, t
  • Catcher in the Rye2
    Catcher in the Rye2 Holden Caulfied: Saint, Snob, or Somewhere In-between? Although J.D. Salinger has only one novel to his credit, that novel, The Catcher in the Rye, is recognized as an exceptional literary work. The key to the success of The Catcher in the Rye is the main character, Holden Caulfield. There are many different critics that view Holden in many different ways. Some believe Holden to be a conceited snob, while others see Holden as a Christ-like figure. It is my opinion, however, t
  • Catcher in the Rye3
    Catcher in the Rye3 The Impossible Job: Catcher in the Rye Recent studies show that depression is common among teenagers. Although the research may be new, it is not a new disease that has occupied teenagers. In the novel Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger, the main character Holden Caufield is a depressed young man searching for good in the world; scenes in this story push Holden over the edge until he has an epiphany that eventually causes him to have a breakdown. Holden\'s constant inquiry a
  • Catcher in the Rye3
    Catcher in the Rye3 The Impossible Job: Catcher in the Rye Recent studies show that depression is common among teenagers. Although the research may be new, it is not a new disease that has occupied teenagers. In the novel Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger, the main character Holden Caufield is a depressed young man searching for good in the world; scenes in this story push Holden over the edge until he has an epiphany that eventually causes him to have a breakdown. Holden\'s constant inquiry a
  • Catcher in the Rye4
    Catcher in the Rye4 The Catcher in the Rye By. J.D. Salinger The setting for the Catcher in the Rye was in New York around the 1950’s. The novel covered about four days from beginning to end. The setting took place in a mental hospital in California where he flashes back to these four days in New York. This was were his family lived and that’s why this was important for the setting. There was one main character in this book and his name was Holden Caulfield. He was very smart and he was always t
  • Catcher in the Rye5
    Catcher in the Rye5 Holden Caufield emphasizes on the loss of innocence in children. He feels that once they lose their innocence, they will soon turn into phonies like everyone else. The loss of innocence is very common in the development in human existence. It is caused by many factors. Past a certain age, children are either forced or led unintentionally into a pathway of corruption. A child is also known to lose their innocence by desires, fantasies, and attention. But once they lose their i
  • Catcher in the Rye6
    Catcher in the Rye6 One theme developed in Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger is that bonds to our family is one of the most important factors in life. This is evident throughout the book since Holden spends so much of his time thinking about, and striving to be with his brothers and sister. Each one of Holden’s siblings plays an important role in helping him cope with his life in school and the many questions that he faces in his everyday life. Aswell as give him a positive thought when he was
  • CATCHER IN THE RYESYMBOLISM
    CATCHER IN THE RYESYMBOLISM Catcher in the Rye Symbolism The Catcher in the Rye, by JD Salinger, is a display of characters and incidents portrayed through the eyes of an adolscent. Holden Caulfield, the main character has been revealed in the first person view in a unique narrative of a teenage boy who forms a transition into adulthood. Holden perceives the world as an evil and corrupt place where there is no purity and that individuals in the world acquire a trait known as "phony." Throughout
  • Cather in da Rye
    cather in da Rye Catcher in the Rye Holden and His "Phony" Family The protagonist, Holden Caulfield, interacts with many people throughout J.D. Salinger’s novel The Catcher in the Rye, but probably none have as much impact on him as certain members of his immediate family. The ways Holden acts around or reacts to the various members of his family give the reader a direct view of Holden’s philosophy surrounding each member. How do Holden’s different opinions of his family compare and do his views
  • Compare
    compare ENG 4AO January 19, 2000 Compare/Contrast Essay Baseball... a true American game and past time that has been part of our lives from the beginning. It has stood the test of time simply because of it’s purity and infinite list of players that have ffostered the game to what it is today. Yet a single blemish remains that took place in 1919 when the World Series was thrown by eight players including Shoeless Joe Jackson. “Shoeless Joe Jackson who last played major league baseball in 1920 and
  • Comparing Teenager
    Comparing Teenager It has been proven that the environment that one grows up with will affect that person\'s life forever. People, especially, help to mold the life of another person. The novels Ordinary People, by Judith Guest, and The Catcher in the Rye, by J.D. Salinger, explore periods of time in the lives of two teenage boys who are both changing because of the people around them. Ordinary People looks into the life of Conrad Jarret, a seventeen year old boy who lives with his mother and fa
  • Holden Caufield
    Holden Caufield In JD Salingers\' Catcher in the Rye, a troubled teenager named Holden Caufield struggles with the fact that everyone has to grow up. The book gets its title from Holden\'s constant concern with the loss of innocence. He did not want children to grow up because he felt that adults are corrupt. This is seen when Holden tries to erase naughty words from the walls of an elementary school where his younger sister Phoebe attended. "While I was sitting down, I saw something that drove
  • J D Salinger
    J D Salinger J. D. Salinger "The worth of a book is to be measured by what you can carry away from it." -James Bryce* In 1945, a novel was published that would forever change the way society views itself. The book, entitled The Catcher in the Rye, would propel a man named Jerome David Salinger to fame as one of the most famous authors of the twentieth century. This same man, not ten years after the publication and while still in the peak of his career, would depart from this society- the one tha
  • JD Salinger
    JD Salinger J. D. Salinger In each short story by J. D. Salinger, a main character struggles with a question concerning different factors in their own life. Some of the noticeable and repetitious themes in Salinger’s stories are Appearance vs. Reality; Adults vs. Children; Sanity vs. Insanity; and the meaning of life. The only difference is the way each character deal with the problems. In Salingers story, "A Perfect Day for Bananafish," Seymore Glass is a young man on Vacation in Florida that w
  • JD Salinger
    JD Salinger J. D. Salinger In each short story by J. D. Salinger, a main character struggles with a question concerning different factors in their own life. Some of the noticeable and repetitious themes in Salinger’s stories are Appearance vs. Reality; Adults vs. Children; Sanity vs. Insanity; and the meaning of life. The only difference is the way each character deal with the problems. In Salingers story, "A Perfect Day for Bananafish," Seymore Glass is a young man on Vacation in Florida that w
  • JD Salinger
    JD Salinger J. D. Salinger In each short story by J. D. Salinger, a main character struggles with a question concerning different factors in their own life. Some of the noticeable and repetitious themes in Salinger’s stories are Appearance vs. Reality; Adults vs. Children; Sanity vs. Insanity; and the meaning of life. The only difference is the way each character deal with the problems. In Salingers story, "A Perfect Day for Bananafish," Seymore Glass is a young man on Vacation in Florida that w
  • Language Usage in the Catcher in the Rye
    Language Usage in the Catcher in the Rye The passage of adolescence has long served as the central theme for many novels, but The Catcher in the Rye, by J.D. Salinger, has captured the energy of this period of life by dramatizing Holden Caulfield\'s somewhat obscene language and emotional reactions. The Catcher in the Rye deals with an intelligent yet confused teenage boy struggling to see the genuineness in society. During his experiences, Holden tends to use easy, natural, but controversial la
  • Loss of innocence in Catcher in the Rye
    Loss of innocence in Catcher in the Rye “Nature’s first green is gold, Her hardest hue to hold. Her early leaf’s a flower; But only so an hour. Then leaf subsides to leaf. So Eden sank to grief, So dawn goes down to day. Nothing gold can stay. -Robert Frost ‘Nothing Gold Can Stay’ by Robert Frost exemplifies the loss of innocence. The poem displays how you are pure and innocent when you are a child but as you mature, it is impossible to remain this way. In The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger
  • Putting on the Rye
    Putting on the Rye One of the many fascinating themes in the novel, “The Catcher in the Rye,” brings us face to face with a jarring assault not unlike road rage on modern society and serves as a wake up call to each succeeding generation of its readers. J.D. Salinger, speaking through the protagonist Holden Caulfield, exposes the bogus standards and false values and the insensitive, sham relationships we face in our pretentious modern society. Alone, Holden stands tall against those counterfeit