Apartheid in Africa Essays and Papers

This essay has a total of 755 words and 4 pages.

Apartheid in Africa

Comparative Politics Gerard Chretien

This is a 2 page paper that discusses the development and progress of the APARTHEID IN SOUTH AFRICA
The term apartheid (from the Afrikaans word for "apartness") was coined in the 1930s and
used as a political slogan of the National Party in the early 1940s, but the policy itself
extends back to the beginning of white settlement in South Africa in 1652. After the
primarily Afrikaner Nationalists came to power in 1948, the social custom of apartheid was
systematized under law. The apartheid was a social and political segregation of the white
rulers from the black locals of South Africa.

Dutch farmers, known as the Boers, settled African lands, taking them from the San and
the Khoi Khoi. Eventually, a rising Great Britain noted the rich resources and strategic
location of the country. Britain imposed its rule on rebellious Boers, pushing the Boers
off their land and eventually sparking the Boer War. Britain employed an overwhelming
force to subdue the Boers, who pioneered guerrilla warfare. Ironically, the Boers, now
called Afrikaners, triumphed. Britain had granted them political rights which they used to
take the government by way of the ballot box. Afrikaners imposed the apartheid system,
which intended to keep the races separate. Black Africans were subject to many controls
and were expected to work the low-wage jobs. Black resistance along with several other
factors resulted in the end of apartheid. The white minority government negotiated a
transition to majority rule, which meant black rule. Nelson Mandela was freed from prison
to become South Africa's first black president (1).

After the primarily Afrikaner Nationalists came to power in 1948, the social custom of
apartheid was systematized under law. The implementation of the policy, later referred to
as "separate development," was made possible by the Population Registration Act of 1950,
which put all South Africans into three racial categories: Bantu (black African), white,
or Coloured (of mixed race). A fourth category, Asian (Indians and Pakistanis), was added
later (2). This was the inception of the historical too of discrimination unleashed on the
poor community of the blacks by the ruling whites called the Apartheid.

The clear reason of this apartheid was to have as less interference of the blacks in the
governmental process as possible. Simple hatred could also be termed as a plausible
reason. The social structure at that time for the blacks was deplorable, they were
assigned to low wage jobs only, had no access to education, they were given separate
homelands, territories where they stayed put and had to carry passports with their finger
prints and photographs if coming into ‘non-black areas'.From 1976 to 1981, four of these
homelands were created, denationalizing nine million South Africans However there were
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