Archimedes Paper

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Archimedes



Archimedes is considered one of the three greatest mathematicians of all time along with
Newton and Gauss. In his own time, he was known as "the wise one," "the master" and "the
great geometer" and his works and inventions brought him fame that lasts to this very day.
He was one of the last great Greek mathematicians.

Born in 287 B.C., in Syracuse, a Greek seaport colony in Sicily, Archimedes was the son of
Phidias, an astronomer. Except for his studies at Euclid's school in Alexandria, he spent
his entire life in his birthplace. Archimedes proved to be a master at mathematics and
spent most of his time contemplating new problems to solve, becoming at times so involved
in his work that he forgot to eat. Lacking the blackboards and paper of modern times, he
used any available surface, from the dust on the ground to ashes from an extinguished
fire, to draw his geometric figures. Never giving up an opportunity to ponder his work,
after bathing and anointing himself with olive oil, he would trace figures in the oil on
his own skin.

Much of Archimedes fame comes from his relationship with Hiero, the king of Syracuse, and
Gelon, Hiero's son. The great geometer had a close friendship with and may have been
related to the monarch. In any case, he seemed to make a hobby out of solving the king's
most complicated problems to the utter amazement of the sovereign. At one time, the king
ordered a gold crown and gave the goldsmith the exact amount of metal to make it. When
Hiero received it, the crown had the correct weight but the monarch suspected that some
silver had been used instead of the gold. Since he could not prove it, he brought the
problem to Archimedes. One day while considering the question, "the wise one" entered his
bathtub and recognized that the amount of water that overflowed the tub was proportional
the amount of his body that was submerged. This observation is now known as Archimedes'
Principle and gave him the means to solve the problem. He was so excited that he ran naked
through the streets of Syracuse shouting "Eureka! eureka!" (I have found it!). The
fraudulent goldsmith was brought to justice. Another time, Archimedes stated "Give me a
place to stand on and I will move the earth." King Hiero, who was absolutely astonished by
the statement, asked him to prove it. In the harbor was a ship that had proved impossible
to launch even by the combined efforts of all the men of Syracuse. Archimedes, who had
been examining the properties of levers and pulleys, built a machine that allowed him the
single-handedly move the ship from a distance away. He also had many other inventions
including the Archimedes' watering screw and a miniature planetarium.

Though he had many great inventions, Archimedes considered his purely theoretical work to
be his true calling. His accomplishments are numerous. His approximation of between 3-1/2
and 3-10/71 was the most accurate of his time and he devised a new way to approximate
square roots. Unhappy with the unwieldy Greek number system, he devised his own that could
accommodate larger numbers more easily. He invented the entire field of hydrostatics with
the discovery of the Archimedes' Principle. However, his greatest invention was integral
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