Baron De Montesquieu

This essay has a total of 797 words and 4 pages.

Baron De Montesquieu


Baron de Montesquieu was a French philosopher who lived around the late 1600's and early
1700's. This was before the French Revolution. He believed strongly in Thomas Locke, who
was another French philosopher. Montesquieu also wrote many books that greatly influenced
the society he was in at that time. Although Montesquieu was thought to be fair, he
believed in slavery. Other ideas that he had were that women were not equal to men, but
could still run government. He believed that women were too weak to be in control.
Montesquieu thought since women were more calm and gentle that they would be helpful
qualities in making decisions in government but not anything else.

Montesquieu wrote three major books when he lived. His first published work was Lettres
Persanes, or Persian Letters. This book deals with the criticism of the wealthy French
lifestyle. The book


is about two Persian's who take a trip to Paris. Montesquieu ridicules the two people throughout the book.
Montesquieu strongly disliked despotism. Despotism is a government run by a tyrant. In
another book, Spirit Of The Laws, he uses despotism to tell about how the different
governments get corrupt. He believed that the only reason a despotism starts is because of
a corruption in a republican or monarchy government.

Montesquieu believed that all things were made up of rules or laws that never changed. He
set out to study these laws with the hope that knowledge of the laws of government would
reduce the problems of society and improve human life. He was very active in his economy
and had a joy for doing so. This made him a very influential person in his society.

Despite Montesquieu's belief in the principles of a democracy, he did not feel that all
people were equal. Montesquieu approved of slavery. He also thought that women were weaker
than men and that they had to obey the commands of their husband. However, he also felt
that women did have the ability to govern. In this way, Montesquieu argued that women were
too weak to be in control at home, but that their calmness and gentleness would be helpful
qualities in making decisions in government.

Montesquieu argued that the best economy would reflect a good government. Government in
which was balanced among three group officials is what he called the best. A good model of
this would be like the United State's government today. He called the idea of separating
government into three branches 'separation of powers.'; He thought it necessary to create
separate branches of government with separate but equal powers. If the government could
run honest and loyal then the economy would soar and economic growth and equity could be
reached at the same time, but of course this is very hard to do.

Montesquieu also had many other books that he wrote. One of the many is called The Sprit
Of The Laws. It gives his viewpoints on the laws that he believes in that are always there
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