Brave New World1 Book Report

This essay has a total of 700 words and 3 pages.


Brave New World1




Imagine living in a society where there is no such thing as mothers or fathers, where you
look exactly like the 500 people standing next to you, where casual sex and drug use is
not only allowed, but is encouraged. Well, the society in Aldous Huxley’s Brave New
World, is just that. While the prophecies from the Brave New World society are quite
different from those of today, they can be argued as both right and wrong, but , and the
technology to make them happen may be just around the corner.

The society of the Brave New World is quite different from ours, with their lack of
spirituality proving that point. “The pleasure-seeking society pursues no spiritual
experiences or joys, preferring carnal ones. The lack of religion that seeks a true
transcendental understanding helps ensure that the masses of people, upper and lower
classes, have no reason to rebel”( 1 ). Another main difference, is the absence of
mothers and fathers, and the technology that makes it possible. “Brave New World is a
futuristic society designed by genetic engineering, and controlled by neural conditioning
with mind-altering drugs and manipulative media. It predestines human embryos to certain
levels of intelligence, and chemically does away with the concept of old age”( 2 ).
Today, the technology is simply not available to create hundreds of humans from the same
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