Cambridge Essay

This essay has a total of 636 words and 3 pages.

Cambridge


England is famous for its educational institutes. It has some of the most famous
universities of the world like Oxford, Cambridge and London universities. The city of
Cambridge is in the county of Cambridgeshire and is famous because it is the home of
Cambridge University, one of the oldest and most prestigious universities of the world.

The Cambridge City occupies an area of 16 square miles. It is 50 miles north of London and
stands on the East Bank of the River Cam, and was originally a place where the river was
crossed. Other than being the home of Cambridge University, Cambridge City itself is a
very lively city. It provides a lot of entertainment such as Ballet, Opera, Drama, Music,
and Film. The river is use mostly for pleasure of boating and punting. The Fitzwilliam
Museum, the University Museum of Archaeology, and the University Museum of the Zoology are
among the best of all museums in Europe.

Foundation of Cambridge
The foundation of Cambridge goes back to 11th century when Norman's built a castle at
River Cam. During Romans time, a small town situated just north of river in the Castle
Hill area. The town was called Granata. Later on during the Saxon period, it was known as
Grantabridge, which means Swampy River Bridge. The name later became Cantabridge and then
by 14th century, Cambridge.

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