Cecil rhodes

This essay has a total of 1050 words and 5 pages.

cecil rhodes

Cecil Rhodes

Cecil Rhodes was born on July 5th, 1853 to a Hertfordshire clergyman. He was one of six
sons to the vicar. He was an unhealthy child, suffering from heart and breathing ailments.
Cecil, unlike two of his brothers, was not sent to Eton or Winchester. Nor did he join the
military. His poor constitution limited his career options, and left him with the choice
of becoming a barrister or a clergyman. He was sent to study at a local grammar school.
After his schooling, and due to his poor health, he was sent to join his eldest brother
Herbert at a cotton plantation in Natal, South Africa in 1870. He had a great love of
agriculture, so the farm suited him.

The plantation failed miserably, so Cecil and his brother moved to Kimberly (in Africa)
one year later. It was in Kimberly where Cecil first came into contact with the valuable
gemstones known as diamonds. In 1871 Cecil and his brother staked a claim in the freshly
opened Kimberly diamond fields, where Cecil made most of his fortune. He persisted in the
mining industry despite harsh conditions and his ailing health.

In 1873 he was sent to Oriel College in Oxford, England, but didn't receive his degree
until 1881 due to his frequent trips to Africa. It was in 1875 that a trip through the
rich territories of Transvaal and Bechuanaland helped inspire his dream of British rule
all over South Africa. He was a zealous countryman and a firm believer in colonization. He
spoke of British dominion from "Cape to Cairo" and to "paint the map red" as red was the
color of Britain and her colonies. He even began construction of a railway from Cape
Colony to Cairo, which remnants of are still in use today.

Before the age of 25, Rhodes was a millionaire. He had struck it rich from the Kimberly
mine, and had set his sights on more wealth. In 1880 he formed the De Beers mining
company, and in 1881 he entered the parliament of Cape Colony, a seat he would hold for
the remainder of his life. In parliament he stressed the importance of northward expansion
of the Transvaal Republic, and in 1885 Britain established a protectorate over
Bechuanaland.

In 1888 Rhodes met with Lobengula, the Ndebele leader in order to pursue further
enterprises. With a translator deliberately leaving out details and skewing what was said,
he got Lobengula to agree to the Rudd Concession, which permitted British mining and
colonization of the land between the Limpopo and Zambezi rivers. In the same agreement,
all African migration up from South Africa was prohibited. In exchange, the British paid
Lobengula 100 pounds a month, as well as 1,000 rifles, 10,000 rounds of ammunition, and a
riverboat. In 1889, Rhodes formed the British South African Company and continued
northwards. In 1890, he became the prime minister and virtual dictator of Cape Colony. He
restricted parliament to literate peoples, preventing African representation. From this
point onwards, Rhodes and the BSAC continued northwards, making their own laws and
installing their own government. The "Pioneer Column" marched northwards, taking over Fort
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