Constitution nonrepresentative Essay

This essay has a total of 723 words and 3 pages.

Constitution nonrepresentative



More than 70 years had gone by between the writing of the Constitution and the 1850’s. The
U.S.’s landscape had grown dramatically and and the North and South had grown apart.
People were truly beginning to divide on the topic of slavery, and The South and the North
were in a precarious position, a slight disruption in the States would bring certain War.
In 70 years the Constitution became a reason for the breakup of the union due to the many
gray area’s in key topics, the fact that it wasn't a fully representative document, and
that it left out many important topics such as slavery.

The Constitution lead lead to the breakup of the Union because it left too many gray
area’s that caused conflict. In document G, President James Buchanan says that the
Southern States are “ Justified in revolutionary resistance to the government of the
Union.” . However he also points out that the Constitution doesn’t say whether or not
Congress can stop a State from seceding. In document I, president Lincoln shows a gray
area. He says the south may “ lawfully and peacefully withdraw from the Union,” by one
interpretation. Yet, because the Constitution is vague in some areas, Lincoln
interpreted the Constitution to mean that they do not have the power to secede, “Our
states have neither more nor less power, than that reserved to them.” As you can see, the
Constitution allowed too much to be interpreted. It was so vague that it caused many
conflicts, and eventually caused the Union to break up.
Continues for 2 more pages >>




  • Louisiana purchase
    louisiana purchase Several great American Statesmen were pivotal in shaping and molding the government of the United States. History has since forgotten some of these founding fathers. The ones remembered throughout history are those we hold up for their accomplishments. Thomas Jefferson is one of the American Statesmen that stands out from the rest as being one of the greatest contributors to our present form of government. Historian Robert Tucker described Jefferson\'s life as being a paradox.
  • A More Perfect Union
    A More Perfect Union The Articles of Confederation The determined Madison had for several years insatiably studied history and political theory searching for a solution to the political and economic dilemmas he saw plaguing America. The Virginian\'s labors convinced him of the futility and weakness of confederacies of independent states. America\'s own government under the Articles of Confederation, Madison was convinced, had to be replaced. In force since 1781, established as a "league of frien
  • Articles of Confederation
    Articles of Confederation From 1781 to 1789 the Articles of Confederation provided the United States with an ineffective government, however there were some strong steps taken in the articles to try and make the United States a better country. The articles created a loose confederation of independent states that gave limited powers to a central government, known as Congress. Some actions taken by Congress, such as the Treaty of Paris, and certain powers that were given to them were sometimes ben
  • Marbury V Madison
    Marbury V Madison In 1800, President John Adams lost his bid for re-election. Thomas Jefferson was voted in for the president. Adams, being a Federalist, disagreed with the beliefs of Jefferson, a republican, and feared that he would shift the power in the government to the states. To prevent this, Adams created many new judicial posts and filled them with Federalists. He did this in quite a rush, being he was going to be out of office soon. All the appointments were given to his Secretary of St
  • Marbury vs Madison
    Marbury vs Madison As the government was newly establishing its stronghold on the nation, forging its way to a powerful republic and instituting precedents for the future, a struggle to preserve the foundations of American Society instituted by Washington and John Adams existed as Thomas Jefferson took office. In an attempt to maintain the edifice of the National Government believing Jefferson would topple the prestigious nation with his atheist views, Adams appointed various Federalists to th
  • Monroe Doctrine
    Monroe Doctrine Monroe Doctrine The Monroe Doctrine can be considered as the United States first major declaration to the world as a fairly new nation. The Monroe Doctrine was a statement of United States policy on the activity and rights of powers in the Western Hemisphere during the early to mid 1800s. The doctrine established the United States position in the major world affairs of the time. Around the time of the Napoleonic Wars in the 1820s, Mexico, Argentina, Chile and Colombia all gained
  • Rooselvelt
    Rooselvelt Franklin Delano Roosevelt Franklin Delano Roosevelt was the 32nd president of the United States. Roosevelt served longer than any other president. His unprecedented election to four terms in office will probably never be repeated; the 22nd Amendment to the Constitution of the United States, passed after his death, denies the right of any person to be elected president more than twice. Roosevelt held office during two of the greatest crises ever faced by the United States: the Great De
  • The Dredd Scott Decision
    The Dredd Scott Decision INTRODUCTION United States Supreme Court case Scott v. Sanford (1857), commonly known as the Dred Scott Case, is probably the most famous case of the nineteenth century (with the exception possibly of Marbury v. Madison). It is one of only four cases in U. S. history that has ever been overturned by a Constitutional amendment (overturned by the 13th and 14th Amendments). It is also, along with Marbury, one of only two cases prior to the Civil War that declared a federal
  • The First Amendment
    The First Amendment No other democratic society in the world permits personal freedoms to the degree of the United States of America. Within the last sixty years, American courts, especially the Supreme Court, have developed a set of legal doctrines that thoroughly protect all forms of the freedom of expression. When it comes to evaluating the degree to which we take advantage of the opportunity to express our opinions, some members of society may be guilty of violating the bounds of the First A
  • The War of 1812
    The War of 1812 The United States of America began to see the effects of Anglo-French War by the early 1800\'s. This European quarrel began affecting the United States shipping industry. Britain and France were violating neutral shipping rights of American merchants. They thought of America as weak due to inadequate time the nation had to develop. These violations were the first and primary provoking factors that led to war with Britain. There was reason that Britain became the target of US mili
  • The War of 1812
    The War of 1812 The United States of America began to see the effects of Anglo-French War by the early 1800\'s. This European quarrel began affecting the United States shipping industry. Britain and France were violating neutral shipping rights of American merchants. They thought of America as weak due to inadequate time the nation had to develop. These violations were the first and primary provoking factors that led to war with Britain. There was reason that Britain became the target of US mili
  • The War of Northern Aggression Analyzed from the C
    The War of Northern Aggression Analyzed from the Confederate Viewpoint The War of Northern Aggression Analyzed from the Confederate Viewpoint Josh Autry Mrs. Mallow English 11 April 29, 2000 The War of Northern Aggression Analyzed from the Confederate Viewpoint Josh Autry Mrs. Mallow English 11 April 29, 2000 Thesis: The world today is blinded from the truth about the "Civil War" just like they are the truth of the creation vs. evolution debate. They’re blinded in the same way as well, misleadin
  • Thomas Jefferson sketch
    Thomas Jefferson sketch Thomas Jefferson A Bio-Sketch Thomas Jefferson- he was a great man. Not only was he one of our founding fathers, he was also the third president of the U.S. and the chairman of the Declaration of Independence committee. Thomas Jefferson was born at Shadwell in Albemarle County, Va. on the thirteenth of April in 1743. His father, Peter Jefferson, was a wealthy land owner, but not really high up. He married Jane Randolph Jefferson who was from one of the first families in V
  • Trail of Tears
    Trail of Tears The Federalists vs. The Anti-Federalists When the revolutionary war was over, the American colonists had found themselves free of British domination. Due to the fact that they were free from British control, they wanted to create their own system of government where tyranny would be practically diminished. Originally, the separate states were connected by The Articles of Confederation. But this document gave the central government no power of their own. Because of this, the states
  • Watergate
    Watergate Watergate: by Randall D. Hutton English 112 English Composition II Dr. John Keeney February 26,1997 end coverpage Outline Thesis statement: Watergate could possibly be the worst scandal in the history of the United States. 1. Richard Nixon. A. Family. B. Political. II. Latest scandals. A. Iran Contra affair. B. Whitewater affair. Ill. Watergate. A. Burglary. B. Plumbers. C. John F.Kennedy IV. Investigation. A. Reporters. B. Special prosecutors. C. Senate hearings. D. Fight for tapes. V
  • Watergate
    Watergate Watergate: by Randall D. Hutton English 112 English Composition II Dr. John Keeney February 26,1997 end coverpage Outline Thesis statement: Watergate could possibly be the worst scandal in the history of the United States. 1. Richard Nixon. A. Family. B. Political. II. Latest scandals. A. Iran Contra affair. B. Whitewater affair. Ill. Watergate. A. Burglary. B. Plumbers. C. John F.Kennedy IV. Investigation. A. Reporters. B. Special prosecutors. C. Senate hearings. D. Fight for tapes. V
  • James Decartes
    James Decartes World War I left many families dead, creating large numbers of orphans. Jamaie (later to become James) Decartes was one of those orphans. His father died in the trenches in France, and his mother was stolen away, never to be seen again. James was 14 when this happened, he hid under floor boards when his mother was taken away. His humble french hometown village, was over run with german foot traffic, traveling to and from the front line. James ‘decided this was no life for him, so
  • Frank Lloyd Wright1
    Frank Lloyd Wright1 NOTE: Received an "A" with some corrections. If your professor is one who checks bibliography\'s be careful with mine. Art History 5 December 2000 Frank Lloyd Wright American architect, Frank Lloyd Wright is considered the pioneer in modern style and one of the greatest figures in twentieth-century architecture (Twombly, 16). According to Frank Lloyd Wright: “…having a good start, not only do I fully intend to be the greatest architect who has yet lived, but fully intend to b
  • Alexander Hamilton
    Alexander Hamilton Alexander Hamilton was born as a British subject on the island of Nevis in the West Indies on the 11th of January 1755. His father was James Hamilton, a Scottish merchant of St. Christopher. His grandfather was Alexander Hamilton, of Grange, Lanarkshire. One of his great grandfathers was Sir R. Pollock, the Laird of Cambuskeith. Hamilton\'s mother was Rachael Fawcette Levine, of French Huguenot descent. When she was very young, she married a Danish proprietor of St. Croix name
  • John Adams
    John Adams John Quincy Adams was the only son of a president to become president. He had an impressive political background that began at the age of fourteen. He was an intelligent and industrious individual. He was a man of strong character and high principles. By all account, his presidency should have been a huge success, yet it wasn\'t. John Quincy Adams\' presidency was frustrating and judged a failure because of the scandal, attached to his election, the pettiness of his political rivals,
  • Ruth Bader Ginsberg
    Ruth Bader Ginsberg Ruth Bader Ginsburg Ruth Bader Ginsburg was born on March 15, 1933 in Brooklyn, New York. Her father, Nathan, was a furrier and her mother, Celia, had a strong passion for reading, language and love of books. Ruth had an older sister, Marilyn, who died of Meningitis. She attended James Madison High School, where she was a cheerleader, baton twirler, played the cello and was editor of the school paper. Graduating top of her class in grammar and high school, she went on to Corn
  • Book report on Thomas Jefferson
    book report on Thomas Jefferson Book Review on Thomas Jefferson Thomas Jefferson by Norman Risjord is a biography of the third president of the United States that takes Thomas Jefferson from his youth through his later years in the early 19th century. The purpose of this book is to give a political and social overview of the Thomas Jefferson\'s life and career. It was written for both the student of American history and the casual reader interested in the genesis of the United States government,
  • Bookreport waller the bridge of madison county
    bookreport waller the bridge of madison county Book Report-Part 1 I will tell you the name and the author of the book and who the main characters are in this paragraph. Robert James Waller wrote the book, The Bridge of Madison County. There are two main characters in the book. One of the main character’s names is Robert Kincaid and the other is Francesca Johnson. In this paragraph I will tell you about Robert Kincaid and a little about his personality. Robert was a photographer for National Geog
  • Secrets unrevealed
    secrets unrevealed The first study of clandestine operations was initiated 1988 in hopes of learning about the relationship between the President and the intelligence committees of Congress. Stephan F. Knott, an Assistance Professor of Political Science at the Untied States Air Force Academy, picked up this study of clandestine operations. In Knott\'s recently published book (1996) Secret and Sanctioned, he unveils the reality that not only were clandestine operations in the Cold War recently, b
  • Motor Training
    Motor Training Motor training to develop readiness, motivation and means of expression, as a basis for learning programs Motor activity is fast becoming a valuable aid in the teaching of academic subjects to elementary school children. The realization of the place motor activity has in the classroom does not imply that physical activity is a prerequisite to learning but rather a method through which a child can learn more easily and understand more fully. Training in physical coordination is not
  • Epic of Gilgamesh1
    Epic of Gilgamesh1 1 Supporting the Ban on Assault Weapons Government 101 Professor March 27, 1998 2 Outline Thesis: Congress should uphold the ban on assault-type weapons. I. Introduction of the history and background information. A. Important statistics concerning assault weapon facts. B. The problem with assault weapons on the streets. C. Assault weapons use in war situations and law enforcement. II. Defending the debate of upholding the ban on gun control. A. The deadly stories and statistic
  • J D Salinger
    J D Salinger J. D. Salinger "The worth of a book is to be measured by what you can carry away from it." -James Bryce* In 1945, a novel was published that would forever change the way society views itself. The book, entitled The Catcher in the Rye, would propel a man named Jerome David Salinger to fame as one of the most famous authors of the twentieth century. This same man, not ten years after the publication and while still in the peak of his career, would depart from this society- the one tha
  • Freedom of the Press conflicts
    Freedom of the Press conflicts From the moment she stepped foot outside, Princess Diana of Whales had camera lenses and microphones pushed in her face. She was constantly pursued and for this reason she sometimes had to hide or disguise herself in order to avoid the unyielding persistence and constant harassment of the press. Eugene Robinson, a journalist in England said, "For the tabloids, day in and day out, no story is bigger than the royal family. All the tabloids employ royal-watching repor
  • Progressive Stuff
    Progressive Stuff TRUTH AND THE EVOLUTION OF THE PROFESSIONS: A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF \'TRUTH IN ADVERTISING\' AND \'TRUE AND FAIR\' FINANCIAL STATEMENTS IN NORTH AMERICA DURING THE PROGRESSIVE ERA Both advertisers and auditors wrestled with the truth of their text during the Progressive Era (1880-1940). Although in North America, advertisers adopted "truth in advertising" as a theme, auditors rejected "true and fair" as a description of financial statements. Auditors instead adopted the weaker s
  • The Second Amendment
    The Second Amendment The Second Amendment “A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed.” Sounds simple doesn’t it? This simple statement of the Bill Of Rights has endured much criticism over the last century. It has been blamed for the violence and, especially within the last few years, has become a scapegoat for political parties wanting to “Clean up America’s streets”. To understand what was tr
  • US Constitution
    US Constitution US CONSTITUTION 1. Article 1 - Enumerated Powers a. Creates Congress - House and Senate b. Lists powers of Congress 1. Regulate commerce 2. Levy taxes 3. Senate tries impeachment proceedings 2. Article 2 - Executive Branch a. President is Commander-in-Chief of the armed forces b. President has appointment power for officers and judges c. Has the power to negotiate treaties d. Veto power 1. Pocket veto - if President does not act in 10 days and Congress is not still in session, bi
  • Aaron Burr
    Aaron Burr Burr, Aaron Although Aaron Burr, b. Newark, N.J., Feb. 6, 1756, fought in the American Revolution and became an important political figure, serving a term (1801-05) as vice-president of the United States, he is best remembered today for having killed Alexander Hamilton in a duel. The son of a president of the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University) and the grandson of another (Jonathan Edwards), Burr could trace his ancestry back to the earliest Puritans. He entered Princeton
  • Aaron Burr1
    Aaron Burr1 Aaron Burr Jr., the son of Ester Edwards Burr and Reverend Mr. Aaron Burr was born on February 6, 1756 in Newark, New Jersey. He was also the grandson of the famous theologian, Jonathan Edwards. His father earned his living as a pastor at The Newark Presbyterian Congregation and the president of The College of New Jersey, which later became the Ivy League school, Princeton University. Upon graduating from Princeton University at the age of 16, Burr Jr. became a lawyer, although his s
  • Articles of Confederation
    Articles of Confederation The Articles of Confederation was the first constitution of the United States of America. The Articles of Confederation were first drafted by the Continental Congress in Philadelphia Pennsylvania in 1777. This first draft was prepared by a man named John Dickinson in 1776. The Articles were then ratified in 1781. The cause for the changes to be made was due to state jealousies and widespread distrust of the central authority. This jealousy then led to the emasculation o
  • ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION vs THE CONSTITUTION
    ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION vs THE CONSTITUTION History ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION vs. THE CONSTITUTION There are major differences between the Articles of Confederation and the Constitution. The Articles of Confederation had been in effect sine 1781. They established what could be referred to as a "league of friendship" and a quasi-constitution for the states that were sovereign and independent subsequent to the American Revolution. Those articles appeared to be "woefully inadequate" to James Madi
  • Articles of Confederation
    Articles of Confederation The Articles of Confederation was the first constitution of the United States of America. The Articles of Confederation were first drafted by the Continental Congress in Philadelphia Pennsylvania in 1777. This first draft was prepared by a man named John Dickinson in 1776. The Articles were then ratified in 1781. The cause for the changes to be made was due to state jealousies and widespread distrust of the central authority. This jealousy then led to the emasculation o
  • Comparison between Democracy in Ancient Greece and
    Comparison between Democracy in Ancient Greece and United States The Influence of the Greeks on American Democracy “Tyranny is the rule of one man to the advantage of the ruler, oligarchy to the advantage of the rich, democracy to the advantage of the poor.” -Aristotle Democracy: a form of government that makes political decisions directly exercised by the whole body of citizens, under procedures of majority rule. This type of democracy is know as a direct democracy, however the form of governme
  • Constitutional convention
    constitutional convention The Constitutional Convention Our country was based upon the idea that every citizen has certain rights that can not be taken away from him/her; these inalienable rights form the backbone for our democracy. Our constitution, which secures our rights and how we are governed, was not an easy task to write. It took near 16 weeks to complete, and it all started on May 14, 1787 at the Constitutional Convention, also know as the Federal Convention, in Philadelphia. The origin
  • Education in the 1800s
    Education in the 1800s Education had an emphasis on many different aspects during the time prior to the Civil War. There was a certain irony that set the mode of this time making things that were said irrelevant to the actions that were taken. The paradoxes of education in Pre civil war America, are evidenced in subject matter, gender, class and race, as well as purpose. American education developed from European intellectual traditions and institutions transplanted to the new world and modified
  • Federalists vs Antifederalists
    Federalists vs Antifederalists Federalists vs. Antifederalists To amend the Articles of Confederation, unanimous approval by all thirteen colonies was a necessity. Instead of reforming the preexisting document, it was decided that once approved by nine states, a newly written document would become the supreme law of the land. Framers of the constitution were voted on by the individual colonies to amend the existing law, the Articles of Confederation, but instead, created something entirely diffe
  • James Maddison
    James Maddison James Madison was born on March 16 1751, in Fort Caonway Virginia.He came from a somewhat wealthy family of Virginia plannters. Madison was educated at The college of New Jersey, Wich is now known as princeton. He graduated in 1771, continued his studies for another year, and then returned home in 1772. He first became involved in politics by joining the Commitee of Safety in 1774. Two years later he Joined the Virginia Constitution convention,and earned the title \'Father of the
  • John Marshal
    John Marshal Blake Zuckerman Period 1 History Did the Supreme Court Under John Marshal have a significant impact on American history? John Marshall was born in 1755. He was the 4th chief justice of the U.S Supreme Court of Virginia for 34 years. (http://www.encyclopedia.com/articles/08102.html) He was a federalist who believed that the U.S should have a powerful central government. Marshall defended the U.S. constitution, and did not trust the Jeffersonians because he felt it was his duty to pro
  • John Quincy Adams
    John Quincy Adams Kristen Miller Ms. Mechikas US History I-section 2 15 March 2000 John Quincy Adams- a success or a failure? John Quincy Adams was the only son of a president to become president. He had an impressive political background that began at the age of fourteen. He was an intelligent and industrious individual. He was a man of strong character and high principles . By all account, his presidency should have been a huge success, yet it wasn\'t. John Quincy Adams\' presidency was frustr
  • Marbury vs Madison
    Marbury vs Madison Marbury V. Madison As the government was newly establishing its stronghold on the nation, forging its way to a powerful republic and instituting precedents for the future, a struggle to preserve the foundations of American Society instituted by Washington and John Adams existed as Thomas Jefferson took office. In an attempt to maintain the “edifice of the National Government” believing Jefferson would topple the prestigious nation with his atheist views, Adams appointed variou
  • None Provided2
    None Provided2 Life and Views of a Western Farmer In the Late 1780s State of the Union After the Revolutionary War, the United States was in a state of economic chaos. Depression and inflation were prevalent as a result of the war. Established trading patterns were in disarray. The Congress had no power at this time under the Articles of Confederation. In the thirteen states, where power was centered, the separate currencies were in shambles. The United States was in need of a government with po
  • Presidents and Conflict Resolution
    Presidents and Conflict Resolution Patrick McShan HIS 3360 November 19, 1999 Presidents and Conflict Resolution The term negotiation has been defined as a formal process that occurs when parties are trying to find a mutually acceptable solution to a complex conflict. People and parties, throughout time, have come to negotiate for two basic reasons. First, they negotiate to create something new that neither party could do on his own. Second, parties negotiate to resolve a problem or dispute betwe
  • Slavery4
    Slavery4 A former slave during the antebellum era, Lewis Clarke, said, “How would you like to see your sisters, and your wives, and your daughter, completely, teetotally, and altogether, in the power of the master. – You can picture to yourselves a little, how you would feel; but oh, if I could tell you!” Blacks during the time of slavery saw the many different experiences women had to go through, from “breeding” slaves to working in the fields (Woman and the Family in a slave society, Catherine
  • The Beginning of Our United States
    The Beginning of Our United States Justin T Professor Omar J. Cuan U.S. History Up Till 1865 18 November 1999 The Beginning of Our United States The British government had enormous problems after the enduring victory over France in the Seven Years War. The Seven Years War had virtually doubled the national public debt, and the attainment of half the territory in North America had vastly compounded the problems of controlling the empire. These circumstances required new revenues for the empire, a
  • The Constitution Virginia and New Jerseys Plans
    The Constitution Virginia and New Jerseys Plans In the late 1780s, prominent political leaders in the United States came to realize that the government created under the Articles of Confederation was ineffective and impractical and could not serve a nation in managing relationships among states nor handle foreign nations. The fear of creating a government that was too powerful was the basis for foundation of the Articles of Confederation. It created a weak national government that allowed for mo
  • The federalist numbers 1051
    the federalist numbers 1051 The Federalist No.’s 10 and 51 The Federalist, No. 10, by James Madison is a clear expression of views and policies for a new government. Madison was a strong supporter and member of the Federalists whose main beliefs favored the Constitution. They also believed that the Articles of Confederation needed to be rewritten so that a new central government would control the power of the states. Madison differentiates between a Democracy and a Republic and later on decides