Dodomooroo Essay

This essay has a total of 522 words and 2 pages.

Dodomooroo

The Electoral College is a system that has been setup to elect the President of the United
States. Over 200 years ago, a committee was formed to determine the best way to elect the
President. The three main methods debated for electing the president were by congress, the
people, or electors. It was decided that in an effort to keep the checks and balances of
our government in order, congress could not elect the president. Although majority felt
that the citizens of the United States should elect the president, they felt that the
citizens would easily be misinformed and not familiar enough with the candidates to choose
the right person. Due to this, it was decided that a group of electors would decide on the
President. Each state casts a number of electoral votes equal to the number of senators
and representatives they have. Small states are given at least three votes and the largest
state, California, has fifty-four votes. The District of Columbia is also included in the
College Electoral process and has three votes, as well. The electors are supposed to cast
their votes based on the popular vote in state, but this does not always happen. If a
candidate wins a number of big states, even if it is by close margins, and loses other
states by wide margins, the candidate could lose the popular vote and still win the
electoral vote. Three United States Presidents have already won based upon this scenario.
In 1876, President Rutherford B. Hayes received and won the presidency by one more
electoral vote than his opponent. In 1888, Benjamin Harrison defeated President Grover
Cleveland with one electoral vote, although President Cleveland won the popular vote. It
has once again happened, as George Bush defeated Al Gore in the 2000 election. Al Gore won
the popular vote and George Bush walked away with the electoral vote and the Presidency.
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