Editha Essay

This essay has a total of 821 words and 4 pages.


Editha





The story “Editha” by William Dean Howells and the poem
“Reconciliation” by Walt Whitman are part of a true “national
literature.” They are both told in a way that only we as Americans could ever
understand. They speak of war in all of its glory, and they speak of all of the pain left
behind.

“Editha” is a story about a woman who loves her country so much that she would
be willing to give up anyone who does not feel as she does. Her fiancé George was not
enthusiastic about the war. To George the war was about senseless bloodshed, but to
Editha it was about taking pride in a country that she loved. She told George, “I
call it a sacred war. A war for liberty and humanity, if ever there was one”(Howells
363). Editha could not understand how George or anyone could not see the importance of
the war. Because of George’s lack of enthusiasm for the war Editha writes him a
letter and says, “But the man I marry must love his country first of
all”(365). These words from Editha show how much she believed in her country.

Editha was not alone many felt this way. The war was a sign of a better life for all if
victory could be had. George did fight in the war and like so many other young men who
went to war, lost his life. Editha was a symbol of what America stood for and what
America meant to so many people who could only dream of having the opportunity to live
here. George was a symbol of all the young men who fought for this country to make it
what it is today. They fought for a country they believed in. They fought for us, and for
our freedom. This story shows the greatness on which this country was founded. Nobody
except Americans could

understand the dedication to a country that today, stands strong because of the love that
the people felt for the land they lived on. Howells tried to show the depth of that love
through Editha and George, which makes this a part of true “national
literature.”

“Reconciliation” is a poem that was meant to open the eyes of the reader to
the effects the war had after it was over. It is written through the eyes of a dead
soldier who has seen what the war has done. This soldier has the blood of many men on his
hands and will always remember the death. Where “Editha” showed the
significance of war in relation to a person’s love of their country,
“Reconciliation” tells in a few strong lines, the somber mood of a country
that has lost many lives. Whitman writes, “For my enemy is dead, a man divine as
myself is dead”(Whitman 129). It is not said what side this “divine”
Continues for 2 more pages >>




  • Lena Horne
    Lena Horne Lena Horne Heather Donahue March 23, 2000 Humanities 15 Tues. & Thurs. 9:30 - 11 a.m. Page 1 Lena Horne Lena Horne was born on June 30, 1917 in Brooklyn, New York. Her parents were Teddy and Edna Scottron Horne. After her father left her at the age of two in order to pursue his gambling career; her mother leaving soon after that to pursue her acting career; she went to live with her grandparents. Through her grandparents influence she became involved with organizations like the NAACP,
  • Books on sex
    books on sex Walt Whitman was born on May 31, 1819 in West Hills, New York. His mother, Louisa Van Velsor, was descended from a long line of New York Dutch farmers; his father, Walt Whitman, was a Long Island farmer and carpenter. In 1823, the family moved to Brooklyn in search of work. One of nine children in an undistinguished family, Whitman received little in the way of formal education. At the age of 17, Whitman began teaching at various Long Island schools and continued to teach until he w
  • Chart
    Chart OLDIES Title Artist 98.6 Cando O? 19th Nervous Breakdown Rolling Stones 59th Street Bridge Song Harper’s Bazaar After the Goldrush Neil Young Ain’t No Stopping Us Now McFadden and Whitehead All Night Long Lionel Ritchie Always and Forever Heatwave American Woman Guess Who Angel of the Morning Merilee Rush Apple, Peaches, Pumpkin Pie Jay and the Techniques Baby Now That I’ve Found You Foundations Backstabbers O’Jays Bad Luck Teddy Pendergrass Baker Street Jerry Rafferty Band of Gold Freida
  • A biography of walt whitman
    A biography of walt whitman Whitman, Walt (1819-1892), American poet, whose work boldly asserts the worth of the individual and the oneness of all humanity. Whitman\'s defiant break with traditional poetic concerns and style exerted a major influence on American thought and literature. Born near Huntington, New York, Whitman was the second of a family of nine children. His father was a carpenter. The poet had a particularly close relationship with his mother. When Whitman was four years old, his
  • Blooming Trinity
    Blooming Trinity English 1302.018 October 11, 2000 Blooming Trinity In the poem “When Lilacs Last In The Dooryard Bloom’d”, by Walt Whitman, three important symbols are introduced. These symbols of a star, the lilac, and a bird exhibit Whitman’s transcendentalism and serve as an allusion to Abraham Lincoln’s life and death. Whitman’s poetry, through these symbols, opens a window to the prevailing social attitudes, moral beliefs, and cultural disposition of his time through his allusions to Presi
  • Charles Russell and Jehovahs Witness
    Charles Russell and Jehovahs Witness Charles Russell and Jehovah’s Witnesses On February 16, 1852, a child was born that would grow up to lead millions of people astray from families, friends, Christianity, and, most importantly, a personal relationship with Jesus Christ. The teachings this child taught later as an adult lead people down a road that will only end in one destination—Hell. On this seemingly normal day in 1852, just outside of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, a son was born to Joseph L. R
  • Lena Horne
    Lena Horne Page 1 Lena Horne Lena Horne was born on June 30, 1917 in Brooklyn, New York. Her parents were Teddy and Edna Scottron Horne. After her father left her at the age of two in order to pursue his gambling career; her mother leaving soon after that to pursue her acting career; she went to live with her grandparents. Through her grandparents influence she became involved with organizations like the NAACP, at an early age. In 1924 she went back to live with her mother, traveling and being
  • Walt Whitman
    Walt Whitman Walt Whitman was born on May 31, 1819, in the West Hills of Long Island, New York. His mother, Louisa Van Velsor, a Dutch Quaker, whom he adored, was barely literate. She never read his poetry, but gave him unconditional love. His father was an Englishman, and a carpenter who built houses, and a stern disciplinarian. He was a friend of Tom Paine, whose pamphlet Common Sense (1776), urging the colonists to throw off English domination was in his sparse library. It is doubtful that h
  • Song of Myself Individuality and Free Verse
    Song of Myself Individuality and Free Verse Forged in the fire of revolution and defined by manifest destiny, America has always been the land of the individual. Although the American dream has not always been consistent, (married with 2.5 kids, 2 cars, a dog and a satisfying job), the spirit of innovation, individuality and progress remains unchanged. The father of free verse, and perhaps the American perspective of poetry, Walt Whitman embodies these values in his life and work. First publish
  • Walt Whitman1
    Walt Whitman1 Walt Whitman Walt Whitman was born on May 31, 1819, in West Hills, Long Island, New York. He was the second of six children. From 1825-1830, he attended public school in Brooklyn. After his years of education, Walt Whitman experimented with many different jobs. From 1836-1838, Whitman taught at several schools in Long Island. After teaching, Walt Whitman returned to printing and editing in New York. During this time he edited many papers such as the Aurora (daily newspaper), Eveni
  • Race In Sports
    Race In Sports The odds that any high school athlete will play a sport on the professional level are about 10,000 to 1. Yet according to a recent survey conducted by Northeastern University\'s Center for the Study of Sport in Society, 66 percent of all African-American males between the ages of 13 and 18 believe they can earn a living playing professional sports. That is more than double the proportion of young white males who hold such beliefs. Black parents also are four times more likely tha
  • Baseball1
    baseball1 "Over the decades, African American teams played 445-recorded games against white teams, winning sixty-one percent of them." (Conrads, pg.8) The Negro Leagues were an alternative baseball group for African American baseball player that were denied the right to ay with the white baseball payers in the Major League Baseball Association. In 1920, the first African American League was formed, and that paved the way for numerous African American innovation and movements. Fences, and Jackie
  • Business
    Business CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION This study will examine the overall affect on society, as well as the historical aspect of the integration of African-Americans, into sports in the United States of America. This study is also designed to discuss and or break down any racial stereotypes involving African-American athletes. Most importantly, this study will also examine the progression that African-Americans have made on the field as athletes and in corporate America as well. The overall affect tha
  • History Of Baseball
    History Of Baseball There is often disagreement about the origin of the baseball. For more than 90 years, people have believed in the myth that Abner Doubleday invented baseball. Baseball developed slowly, and changed with time, and that is why it is called America\'s national pastime. Some believe it was a popular game from England where milkmaids and farmer hands would toss a softball underhand and hit it with a closed fist. Others even say it was evolved from cricket. From 1905-07, a special
  • American Writers And Their Works: Hawthorne, Poe,
    American Writers And Their Works: Hawthorne, Poe, And Whitman American Writers and Their Works: Hawthorne, Poe, and Whitman Out of all the great authors and poets we have studied this semester I have chosen the three that I personally enjoyed reading the most; Nathaniel Hawthorne, Edgar Allen Poe, and Walt Whitman. These three Writers stand out above the rest for each has contributed substantially to bringing forth a newly earned respect for American Writers of Literature. Up until this point in
  • Jehovahs Witness
    Jehovahs Witness Jehovah\'s Witnesses Jehovah\'s Witnesses are a people known widely throughout the world. They are well-dressed people who come knocking at your door on different occasions offering religious literature for sale or trying to introduce their beliefs through carefully prepared conversation. People young, old, rich, poor, well educated and non-educated have embraced them. Their enthusiasm as proclaimers of God\'s Kingdom has impressed even their harshest critics. Their love toward
  • Baseball
    baseball There is often disagreement about the origin of the baseball. For more than 90 years, people have believed in the myth that Abner Doubleday invented baseball. Baseball developed slowly, and changed with time, and that is why it is called America\'s national pastime. Some believe it was a popular game from England where milkmaids and farmer hands would toss a softball underhand and hit it with a closed fist. Others even say it was evolved from cricket. From 1905-07, a special investigati
  • Lena Horne
    Lena Horne By: Heather Donahue E-mail: heath20@aol.com Lena Horne Heather Donahue March 23, 2000 Humanities 15 Tues. Thurs. 9:30 - 11 a.m. Page 1 Lena Horne Lena Horne was born on June 30, 1917 in Brooklyn, New York. Her parents were Teddy and Edna Scottron Horne. After her father left her at the age of two in order to pursue his gambling career; her mother leaving soon after that to pursue her acting career; she went to live with her grandparents. Through her grandparents influence she became i
  • My Best Friend
    My Best Friend Walt Whitman was an American poet, who was born in 1819 and died in 1892 whose work boldly asserts the worth of the individual and the oneness of all humanity. Whitman\'s defiant break with traditional poetic concerns and style exerted a major influence on American thought and literature. Born near Huntington, New York, Whitman was the second of a family of nine children. His father was a carpenter. The poet had a particularly close relationship with his mother. When Whitman was f
  • Innovation In David Mc Culloughs The Great Bridge
    Innovation In David Mc Culloughs The Great Bridge ALBERT EINSTEIN once said about the invention of the Atomic Bomb that it was as much a matter of scientific knowledge and astuteness, as it was a call of circumstances and time. The millennial brightness of Albert Einstein, the pressing imminence of war and the determination to succeed of the American government and scientists, are part of the ecology of innovation that surrounded the emergence of nuclear technology, and eventually led to the cre
  • Song Of Myself: Individuality And Free Verse
    Song Of Myself: Individuality And Free Verse Forged in the fire of revolution and defined by manifest destiny, America has always been the land of the individual. Although the American dream has not always been consistent, (married with 2.5 kids, 2 cars, a dog and a satisfying job), the spirit of innovation, individuality and progress remains unchanged. The father of free verse, and perhaps the American perspective of poetry, Walt Whitman embodies these values in his life and work. First publish
  • Institutionalized Racism: The Negro Leagues
    Institutionalized Racism: The Negro Leagues OUTLINE 1. Introduction a. Hook: Over the decades, black teams played 445-recorded games against white tams, winning sixty-one percent of them. b. Historical Information i. General background about the League c. Thesis: Fences, and Jackie Robinson: The Biography, raises consciousness about the baseball players that have been overlooked, and the struggle they endured simply because of their color. 2. History of the Negro Leagues as portrayed in Jackie R
  • Civil war
    Civil war THE CAUSE Americans have always been independent group of people. We just don\'t like being told what to do. This is true now as it was in the past, or will be in the future. It all started in the early colonial era (1700) when we really felt ourselves as "Americans". Before that in the 1600\'s we were just settlers in the new America. In the 1700\'s we fought with the British to stop the union of France and Spain. We started our own newspaper, the Pennsylvania Gazett published by Benj
  • Ramones; punk rock
    ramones; punk rock The splitting up of the Ramones gives us the opportunity to draw a definitive profile and to give some kind of sense to the frenetical life lived by one of the greatest band of the rock history. Some might say that we\'re exaggerating. How can we consider a group that never changed anything since its start as big ? What credibility these old rockers dressed in black leather have at the beginning of the new millenium? These are the two criticisms that are usually made concernin
  • Institutionalized Racism: The Negro Leagues
    Institutionalized Racism: The Negro Leagues OUTLINE 1. Introduction a. Hook: Over the decades, black teams played 445-recorded games against white tams, winning sixty-one percent of them. b. Historical Information i. General background about the League c. Thesis: Fences, and Jackie Robinson: The Biography, raises consciousness about the baseball players that have been overlooked, and the struggle they endured simply because of their color. 2. History of the Negro Leagues as portrayed in Jackie R
  • Song of Myself: Individuality and Free Verse
    Song of Myself: Individuality and Free Verse Forged in the fire of revolution and defined by manifest destiny, America has always been the land of the individual. Although the American dream has not always been consistent, (married with 2.5 kids, 2 cars, a dog and a satisfying job), the spirit of innovation, individuality and progress remains unchanged. The father of free verse, and perhaps the American perspective of poetry, Walt Whitman embodies these values in his life and work. First publish
  • Tornadoes
    Tornadoes Tornadoes HAINES CITY, Fla. (Dec. 27) - Tess Bentley knew the high-pitched whine that woke her early Saturday was a tornado. She took two steps and dived into her bedroom closet full of clothes. Within seconds, Mrs. Bentley, 48, and her two-bedroom house were spinning in the air. She was still in her closet when her home landed upside down on top of a neighbor\'s house about 50 yards away. More than 100 homes were damaged by the tornado that tore through the Lake Region Mobile Village,