Effects of WWII Essay

This essay has a total of 785 words and 4 pages.


Effects of WWII





Impact of WWII

World War II had a definite impact on the United States. It changed how people lived and
how other people were viewed. Not many people realize the treatment of people from our
own country during World War II. Three groups of people that were affected were women,
African Americans, and Japanese Americans. The lives of these people were changed
drastically, whether by having to work, mistreatment because of skin color, or by being
blamed for something that was done by a country they were native to.

Prior to World War II, employers and the government held that there were jobs appropriate
for women and jobs which were inappropriate because women were not capable of fulfilling
the tasks involved in such work. As we discussed in class, some women had jobs and some
stayed as housewives but women were always dependent on men. The War years gave the
opportunity to not only women but to the whole nation to break away from this trend. In
my notes it discusses that women really took this chance to prove themselves that they
were every bit as capable as men in the traditionally male work place. Unfortunately,
there were no long lasting effects on women’s status in the work force. Regardless
of how competent women had proven themselves during the war in its aftermath they were not
wanted in the male related jobs anymore. However, this did prove that women could do
perform and gave them confidence. This helped spark a movement that would carry on and
ultimately give women more rights. Though World War II somewhat helped women and gave
them opportunities, it is hard to say the same for African Americans.

African Americans were greatly affected by World War II. Many African Americans served
their country with loyalty. They went on to war and fought, some even died for freedom.
This freedom was something they really never truly had. African Americans were
discriminated against even though they were serving their country. Like we discussed in
class, some African Americans were lynched in public while dressed in their military
uniform. Many were severely beaten almost to death. They were treated with no respect.
As I looked through my notes I found that African Americans were grouped together in
combat and often were given missions that could have been considered suicidal. Although
the blacks were treated poorly, it seems that the Japanese Americans got the raw end of
the deal during the war.

Shortly after the United States entered into war with Japan, the federal government
initiated a policy whereby 120,000 people of Japanese ancestry were rounded up and herded
into camps, 2/3 of these people were actually United States citizens. They were
incarcerated without indictment, trial, or counsel - not because they had committed a
Continues for 2 more pages >>




  • Effects of WWII
    Effects of WWII Impact of WWII World War II had a definite impact on the United States. It changed how people lived and how other people were viewed. Not many people realize the treatment of people from our own country during World War II. Three groups of people that were affected were women, African Americans, and Japanese Americans. The lives of these people were changed drastically, whether by having to work, mistreatment because of skin color, or by being blamed for something that was done
  • JAPANESE INTERNMENT
    jAPANESE INTERNMENT The Japanese-American Internment in Topaz, Utah For as long as mankind can remember, prejudice in one form or another has always been apparent in the world. For some, it is religion, color, or race. But, during the second world war, prejudices were directed at people whose nationalities werent of native American blood. The Japanese-Americans were exploited and forced into relocation camps during World War II all because the American government thought of them as a threat
  • Picture Bride
    Picture Bride Immigrants arriving in America for their first time are initially devastated at their new lives and realize their "golden lives" were simply fantasies and dreams of an ideal life in America. Immigrants from foreign countries, including those mentioned in Uchida\'s Picture Bride, faced countless problems and hardships, including a sense of disillusionment and disappointment. Furthermore, immigrants and picture brides faced racial discrimination not only from white men, but the Unite