Emmitt Till Essay

This essay has a total of 561 words and 4 pages.

Emmitt Till



Emmit Till was like any other ordinary boy. He lived in Chicago in 1955 with his mother.
But this summer he was going to visit his Uncle Mose who lived down south. Down south and
Chicago were totally different. First of all, you couldn't go to a school with someone
that wasn't your color, you couldn't go to any bathroom you wanted and couldn't eat where
you wanted. In other words, it was segregated. Now, let me get back to my story.


"I can't wait till go I down south. I wonder what it will be like."said Emmit.

"I think you'll like it, but stay out of trouble ya hear. "said Emmit's mom.

"Ok. "said Emmit.

The next day Emmit arrived. He met up with his Uncle Mose and went straight to his Uncle's house.

"So how old are you now?" said Uncle Mose.

"Fourteen." said Emmit.

"So, yah like fried chicken? "said Uncle Mose.

"Yeah" said Emmit.

"Good cause thats what we having for dinner"said uncle Mose

So they had dinner and Emmit went to bed.The next day Emmit went outside to go meet some
new friends, but he took his junior high school graduation picture with him. A few minutes
later he met two boys named Tony and Stacey. Emmit said, "Look at my class picture."


Tony said, "Why are there white people in your class?"

Emmit said, " I don't know. Why don't you?"

Stacey said, "They aren't allowed in our school."

Tony said, "Since you hang around white people so much, I dare you to go talk to that white lady in that store."

Emmit said, "Ok."

So Emmit went to the candy store and bought candy. He paid for it and before he left he
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