Term Paper on Ernest Hemingway

This essay has a total of 2660 words and 9 pages.


Ernest Hemingway






I. Ernest Hemingway’s tough, Terse prose and short, declarative sentences did more to
change the style of written English that any other writing in the twentieth century. II.
Ernest Hemingway has had many great accomplishments in his historical life but just one
event has hardly sticks out from the rest. The Old Man and the Sea is one of Hemingway’s
most enduring works. Told in Language of great simplicity and power, it is the story of an
old Cuban fisherman, agonizing battle with a giant marlin far out in the Gulf Stream. Here
Hemingway recasts, in strikingly contemporary style, the classic theme of courage in the
face of defeat, of personal triumph won from loss. Written in 1952, this hugely successful
novel confirmed his power and presence in the literacy world and played a large part in
his winning the 1954 Nobel Prize for Literature. This novel also won the Pulitzer Prize
award. III. July 21st, 1899, Ernest Hemingway was born. He was born to DR Clarence Edmonds
and Grace Hall Hemingway. He grew up in a small conservative town called Oak Park,
Illinois. His father, a practicing doctor, taught him how to hunt and fish, while his
mother, wished to make him a professional musician. His upbringing was very conservative
and somewhat religious. He attended Oak Park and River Forest High School, where he
distinguished himself in English. His main activities where swimming, boxing, and of
course writing. In 1917, turning his back on University, he decided to move to booming
Kansas City where he got a job as a cub reporter on the Kansas City Star. At the train
station, his father, who later on disgusted Ernest by committing suicide, kissed his son
tenderly good-bye with tears in his eyes. This moment was eventually captured in For Whom
the Bell Tolls. Hemingway wrote that he felt 'so much older than his father... that he
could hardly bear it'. The Star was the first to introduce Ernest to news writing which
demands brief, to the point sentences, that contain a smooth easy following of ideas. He
would later adapt this style to his fiction. In May of 1918, Hemingway became an honorary
second lieutenant in the Red Cross. He could not join the army due to a defective left eye
(resentfully inherited from his mother). On his first day of service across seas, he and
other ambulance drivers were assigned the horrific duty of picking up body parts from an
exploded munitions factory. Death, mostly of women, on such a scale was most definitely
another very shocking moment in Hemingway's young life. But he soon recovered from this
experience and became known as the man who was always where the action is. He would often
sneak cigarettes and chocolate to soldiers on the Italian front. It was on one of these
occasions that he was severely wounded by an Austrian trench mortar. Even with over a
hundred pieces of shrapnel and an Austrian machine gun bullet logged in his leg he managed
to carry a wounded soldier a hundred yards to safety. He got the Italian Medal of Valor
for his courageous action. He spent his recovery time at the Ospedale Croce Rossa
Americana, in Milan. It is there that he met and fell for a thirty year-old nurse called
Agnes Hannah. To Ernest's disappointment, Agnes was not willing to embark in a
relationship. Ernest, who had not yet turned twenty, who was a war hero, a journalist and
a wounded soldier, was too young for beautiful Agnes . With the will to write fiction, he
moved to Chicago where most of his work was refused. He lived by writing for the Toronto
Star and working as a sparing partner for boxers. It was in Chicago that Hemingway met
Elizabeth Hadley Richardson. She was an innocent young woman with graceful features and a
strong attraction for the eight year younger Hemingway. Not having much income and wanting
to marry Hadley, Ernest chose to move to Paris. Hemingway managed to convince the Toronto
Star to accept a series of Letters from Europe. The young couple also received money from
Hadley's trust fund while Ernest continued to work as a sparing partner for boxers. In
Paris, Hemingway encountered many of the greats (historically known as The Expatriates).
He met Gertrude Stein, Ezra Pound, James Joyce, Scott Fitzgerald , Ford Madox Ford and
John Dos Passos. It was Stein who took him under her wing. She had been working to renew
literary writing by removing useless gothic, Victorian and archaic forms. She was the
first to point Hemingway in the direction of the 'simple declarative sentence', an attempt
to make words communicate concretely and efficiently. It was also during this period of
his life that Hemingway discovered the bull fight, the Pamplona bull run and the famous
San Fermin July Fiesta. He would later write several books and short stories about bull
fighting and the many events that surround this tragic ritual. Among these are Death in
the Afternoon and The Dangerous Summer. Quickly after Patrick's birth, they moved on to
what would remain Hemingway's only true residence in the United States-- Key West,
Florida. It was there that a whole new world broke itself open to the sportsman in Ernest.
Fishing the deep sea for great fish like the tarpon and the barracuda was his newest love.
But even in Key West, a heavenly earth, tragedy struck Ernest. His father, struggling with
diabetes and angina pectoris, had put a bullet through his head. Hemingway was very
ashamed of this. He had always felt that life was for the testing of death. Suicide was
the surrendering of life to death. This was forbidden in his code of courage. From that
day on, Ernest turned his back on his father. 1929 marked the release of A Farewell to
Arms. It was instantly accepted as a great work by critics and the public. With the
success of this novel, Hemingway became a true American writer. To many, he also became a
hot headed fool. He would make loud remarks about some of his fellow writers. He would
make proclamations about artistic integrity that he himself would often not respect. He
clearly was no longer the shy young journalist he had been for the Kansas City Star. He
had become Papa. Even with the beautiful surroundings of the Key West, Hemingway still
longed for Spain. At the time he was tediously working on Death in the Afternoon, a
marvelous, intriguing and powerful look at the bullfight. Although at times overdone,
Death in the Afternoon will capture greatness and power in the minds of its readers, even
those that are most disgusted by the bullfight. After Ernest finished Death in the
Afternoon and Pauline gave birth to another boy, they set off for Africa. It was there
that Hemingway hopped to find the true meaning of heroism. Three stories would result from
the events of Africa. The Green Hills of Africa, which lacked effective meaning and
carried a false tone of masculine hunting spirit, was the least successful. The Snows of
Kilamanjaro was a much more potent tale about the hunt. Arguably one of Hemingway's best,
it drew from the troubles of a broken Scott Fitzgerald to depict the guilt of a talented
yet unacomplished artist as he faced death. The last short story to result from Africa was
Continues for 5 more pages >>




  • A Rose for Emily
    A Rose for Emily The Symbolism and Characterization in "A Rose for Emily" by William Faulkner In the short story "A Rose for Emily" by William Faulkner, the macabre ending is foreshadowed by the story\'s opening with Miss Emily Grierson\'s death and funeral. The bizarre outcome is further emphasized throughout by the symbolism of the decaying house, which parallels Miss Emily\'s physical deterioration and demonstrates her ultimate mental disintegration. Her life, like the house which decays arou
  • Abortion
    abortion Click Here to Visit our Sponsor Abortion Life or Death ÄÄÄ Who Chooses? In Roman times, abortion and the destruction of unwanted children was permissible, but as out civilization has aged, it seems that such acts were no longer acceptable by rational human beings, so that in 1948, Canada along with most other nations in the world signed a declaration of the United Nations promising every human being the right to life. The World Medical Association meeting in Geneve at the same time, sta
  • CMU Essay
    CMU Essay "A University should be a place of delight, of liberty, and of learning," remarked Benjamin Disraeli, an English author, as if he had Carnegie Mellon in mind as he placed his thoughts in writing. How could the Institute of Technology help me achieve intellectual independence and assist me in pursuing a life of ideas? Being one of the finest establishments in the world, Carnegie Institute of Technology would allow me to fulfill my perfectionist ideals; I would be able to compete with th
  • DON QUIXOTE THE STORY OF AN ANTIHERO
    DON QUIXOTE THE STORY OF AN ANTIHERO DON QUIXOTE: THE STORY OF AN ANTIHERO By: Bagrat Sakhvadze A hero is a man of great strength and courage admired for his exploits, qualities and achievements; he is thought of as an ideal or a role model. Heroes in literature include Ulysses, a brave warrior who fought the Cyclops; Hercules, noted for his physical strength and courage in accomplishing the Twelve Labors; and Jason, who fearlessly successfully completed amazing tasks in order to regain his Gree
  • Grace
    grace I need to talk to someone. dad left.. he left a fax.. i can\'t believe this.. he gave me money this morning. i knew something was wrong. i had a feeling he\'d leave. i just knew it, in my head you know. sixth sense or something. I\'m so... sad i guess. I feel like it\'s my fault. We were so low to him. maybe i feel worse about this thing because i kind of know how he feels i heard them fighting. i heard him crying. i feel so bad. he was doing so much work for us. we didn\'t even thank him
  • Hamlet Delay
    Hamlet Delay Hamlet\'s Delay Everyone contains a tinge of Hamlet in his feelings, wants, and worries, and proudly so, for Hamlet is not like the other tragic heroes of his period. He stands apart from other Shakespeare\'s heroes in his today much discussed innocence. Is this supposed tragic hero maybe an ideal hero - one without the tragic flaw, which has been a part of the formula for the tragedy since the Golden age of Greece?; is a question that has been the field for many literary critics\'
  • International Terrorism
    International Terrorism INTERNATIONAL TERRORISM By John Freel. This was a very difficult project for me to carry out, coming from an area were racial discrimination is almost non existent were only sometimes does religious bigotry raise it\'s ugly head, but not nearly in the proportions of this project. KU KLUX KLAN. Ku Klux Klan, is a secret terrorist organisation that originated in the southern states during the period of Reconstruction following the American Civil War and was reactivated on a
  • ROMANTICISM
    ROMANTICISM Romanticism literature in poetry and how it effects everyday society. "I have no quarrel, it is scarcely necessary to add, either with the man of science or the romanticist when they keep in their proper place." (Gleckner 33). Some people are still unclear of the exact boundaries in which literature is considered Romanticism, but few common relations seem to be apparent in all or most pieces."The Romantic believes that the particular qualities which make-up humanness - mind, purpose,
  • Student1
    student1 SD 1 The Storm Since the beginning of time, men and women have felt passion for each other. As time has past, many authors have written about the overwhelming feelings that can occur between humans and the power of lust. It is the search for pleasure, for feeling alive, and for feeling like a passionate human being. Kate Chopin describes these emotions in "The Storm" a story that can be compared with similar themes of today. First, after many years of marriage, couples might lose the fe
  • Thr Japanese people
    Thr Japanese people The number of foreigners learning Japanese continuously increases each year. This therefore leads me to believe that these people must have an interest in Japan. However, it does make one wonder what images they have of Japan. Do these people really have a good and right image of Japan? I am acquainted with a few of these people and they claim their love of Japan is due to its fascinated with their own culture and heritage? The Japanese are amongst the easiest people to get a
  • To Kill A Mocking Bird
    To Kill A Mocking Bird To Kill A Mocking Bird   To Kill A Mockingbird "Classic," a term one uses to describe many things, such as a defining moment or an object such as a book. When used in this context, such as describing a book, it persuades the reader to examine the novel further to discover what makes this piece of literature so memorable to people who have read it. One such novel is Harper Lee\'s To Kill A Mockingbird. One may describe this novel as a classic because the messages described
  • The Rainmaker
    WOW The Rainmaker The world is full of great novels. From Sherlock Holmes to the three musketeers. As the years progress more novels are written and more money is made. John Grisham is a rising star in literature. His books have enticed readers and has given the people something good to read. What makes his books great is that they are so realistic. He applies his personal law and trial knowledge into the books he writes.What it is about ? It was his last semester of law school. Rudy Baylor was
  • A rough Man
    A rough Man Rough, vigorous, hot-tempered and rich is what Mark Twain grew up to be. Born 1835 in Missouri, Florida he always did what he needed to in order for him to reach his goal. Even though he dropped out of school at the age of twelve, when his father died, he accomplished numerous things. Mark began writing when he took the job of a journalist. The tale \'The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County\' was his first success. After a trip by boat to Palestine, he wrote The Innocents Abr
  • Albert Einstein
    Albert Einstein Albert Einstein Of all the scientists to emerge from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries there is one whose name is known by almost all living people. While most of these do not understand this man\'s work, everyone knows that its impact on the world of science is astonishing. Yes, many have heard of Albert Einstein\'s General Theory of relativity, but few know about the intriguing life that led this scientist to discover what some have called, "The greatest single achievement
  • Alexander The Great
    Alexander The Great Alexander the Great and His Achievements Alexander the Great was the king of Macedon. Alexander of Macedon, or ancient Mecadonia, deserves to be called the "Great". Alexander the Great was considered one of the greatest military geniuses of all times. He was an excellent king, general, and conqueror. During his thirteen-year rule he conquered almost all the then known world and gave a new direction to history. He had established an empire after he died. His new empire helped
  • Andrew Carnegie
    Andrew Carnegie Andrew Carnegie Essay written by aliciareagan@neo.tamu.edu A man of Scotland, a distinguished citizen of the United States, and a philanthropist devoted to the betterment of the world around him, Andrew Carnegie became famous at the turn of the twentieth century and became a real life rags to riches story. Born in Dunfermline, Scotland, on November 25, 1835, Andrew Carnegie entered the world in poverty. The son of a hand weaver, Carnegie received his only formal education during
  • Ben Franklin BiographyCritique
    Ben Franklin BiographyCritique Ben Franklin: Early Life In his many careers as a printer, moralist, essayist, civic leader, scientist, inventor, statesman, diplomat, and philosopher, for later generations of Americans he became both a spokesman and a model for the national character. He was born in Boston, Massachusetts on Jan. 17, 1706, into a religious Puritan household. His father, Josiah, was a candlemaker and a skillful mechanic. His mother, Abiah Ben’s parents raised thirteen children--the
  • Black Americans
    Black Americans Black Americans Black Americans are those persons in the United States who trace their ancestry to members of the Negroid race in Africa. They have at various times in United States history been referred to as African, coloured, Negro, Afro-American, and African-American, as well as black. The black population of the United States has grown from three-quarters of a million in 1790 to nearly 30 million in 1990. As a percentage of the total population, blacks declined from 19.3 in
  • Candide
    Candide Voltaire\'s Candide CANDIDE Translated with an Introduction by John Butt 0-14-044004-6 In a world of bureaucrats, engineers, and producers, Voltaire is the necessary philosopher. --Gustave Lanson The Best of All Possible Worlds An Introduction to Candide While Candide is without a doubt a farcical, humorous, and far-fetched tale, a seriousness lies beneath its satirical veneer. Candide is the story of an innocent young man embarking on a series of adventures during which he discovers muc
  • Edgar Allen Poe
    Edgar Allen Poe 2/96 The short story writer which I have chosen to research is Edgar Allen Poe. After reading one of his works in class, I realized that his mysterious style of writing greatly appealed to me. Although many critics have different views on Poe\'s writing style, I think that Harold Bloom summed it up best when he said, "Poe has an uncanny talent for exposing our common nightmares and hysteria lurking beneath our carefully structured lives. " ( 7) For me, this is done through his us
  • Education and Egalitarianism in America
    Education and Egalitarianism in America The American educator Horace Mann once said: "As an apple is not in any proper sense an apple until it is ripe, so a human being is not in any proper sense a human being until he is educated." Education is the process through which people endeavor to pass along to their children their hard-won wisdom and their aspirations for a better world. This process begins shortly after birth, as parents seek to train the infant to behave as their culture demands. The
  • Henry David Thoreau
    Henry David Thoreau Henry David Thoreau American literature during the first half of the nineteenth century took many forms and ideas that still effect our ever so changing society today. Henry David Thoreau was among the notable writers during this time, and his impact of American literature will not soon be forgotten. His perseverance, love for nature, and humanitarian beliefs helped to mold the ideas and values of early American history. He was born in Concord, Massachusetts on July 12 in 181
  • History of Medicine in America
    History of Medicine in America James Cassedy’s Medicine in America, A Short History takes a comprehensive look at medical progress in America from its colonial days to the present time. The book takes on five different themes in discussing medicine. First, it discusses the medical establishment, and how it develops over time. Second, it looks at the alternative to established medicine. Alternatives consist of any kind of medical practice outside the orthodox practice of the time. Third, Cassedy
  • Jack Kerouac and the beat movement
    Jack Kerouac and the beat movement “World War II marked a wide dividing line between the old and the new in American society and the nation’s literature”(The World Book Encyclopedia 427) . When world War II ended there was a pent up desire that had been postponed due to the war. Post war America brought about a time when it seemed that every young man was doing the same thing, getting a job, settling down and starting a family. America was becoming a nation of consumers. One group that was again
  • Johnathan Edwards and Benjamin Franklin
    Johnathan Edwards and Benjamin Franklin Jonathan Edwards and Benjamin Franklin Jonathan Edwards and Benjamin Franklin both wrote simply, directly and without aristocratic pretense. They felt writing was not an end in itself, but a work done in the service of something greater whether it be God or mankind. In his "Personal Narrative," Edwards focuses on the ecclesiastical whereas Franklin, in "The Way to Wealth" appeals to the individual. Edwards wrote to understand what was happening around him
  • Land Of Desire
    Land Of Desire Land of Desire: Merchants, Power, and the Rise of a New American Culture William Leach Random House; 1993 428 Pages The transformations that America went through in order to become a capitalist country were very significant and are sometimes looked past. However, in the book Land of Desire, the author, William Leach extensively goes into many of those things. There were many things that went into this ranging from specific poeple and incidents to outside places and things. Leach s
  • Mark Twain
    Mark Twain MARK TWAIN a.k.a. Samuel Langhorne Clemens "Mark Twain, which is a pseudonym for Samuel Langhorne Clemens, was born in 1835, and died in 1910. He was an american writer and humorist. Maybe one of the reasons Twain will be remembered is because his writings contained morals and positive views. Because Twain\'s writing is so descriptive, people look to his books for realistic interpretations of places, for his memorable characters, and his ability to describe his hatred for hypocrisy an
  • Martin luther king
    martin luther king One of the worlds best known advocates of non-violent social change strategies, Martin Luther King Jr. (MLK), synthesized ideals drawn from many different cultural traditions. Recent studies of him emphasize the extent to which his ideals were rooted in African-American religious traditions which were then shaped by his education. The image of a social activist and leader was the result of extensive formal education, strong personal values and licit ethics. This excellence in
  • Martin luther king
    martin luther king One of the worlds best known advocates of non-violent social change strategies, Martin Luther King Jr. (MLK), synthesized ideals drawn from many different cultural traditions. Recent studies of him emphasize the extent to which his ideals were rooted in African-American religious traditions which were then shaped by his education. The image of a social activist and leader was the result of extensive formal education, strong personal values and licit ethics. This excellence in
  • Muckrakers
    muckrakers Muckraking was a powerful journalistic force, whose supporters made it become so. Muckraking was the practice of writers and critics exposing corrupt politicians and business practices. President Theodore Roosevelt made the term "muck-raker" popular. He once said The man with the muck-rake, the man who could look no way but downward with the muck-rake in his hands; who was offered a celestial crown for his muckrake, but who would neither look up nor regard the crown he was offered, bu
  • Rosa parks
    rosa parks Racism and prejudice have been dominant issues in the United States for many years. Being such a major issue is society, racism is also a major theme in one of the best pieces of American Literature, To Kill A Mockingbird. People, particularly African Americans, have been denied basic human rights such as getting a fair trial, eating in a certain restaurant, or sitting in certain seats of public buses. However, in 1955 a woman named Rosa Parks took a stand, or more correctly took a se
  • The Hippie Culture
    The Hippie Culture The Hippie Culture Life in America has been molded by many factors including those of the hippie movement in the Sixties. With the development of new technology, a war against Communism, and an internal war against racial injustice, a change in America was sure to happen. As the children of the baby boom became young adults, they found far more discontent with the world around them. This lead to a subculture labeled as hippies, that as time went one merged into a mass society
  • The last kamikaze
    the last kamikaze The Last Kamikaze. Edwin P. Hoyt. Praeger Publishers, 1993. Pp.xvi, 235. The Last Kamikaze is a book written by well-recognized military historian Edwin P. Hoyt about Matome Ugaki, a Vice Admiral in the Japanese Imperial Navy during World War II. The book chronicles the diary of Ugaki from preparing for the attack on Pearl Harbor to his final suicide mission in 1945. Using his own style of part-biography, part-historiography, Hoyt intermixes exerts from Ugaki’s diary with his o
  • The People Leisure and Cultures of Blacks During t
    The People Leisure and Cultures of Blacks During the HArlem Renaissance The People, Leisure, and Culture of Blacks During the Harlem Renaissance It seems unfair that the pages of our history books or even the lecturers in majority of classrooms speak very little of the accomplishments of blacks. They speak very little of a period within black history in which many of the greatest musicians, writers, painters, and influential paragon\'’ emerged. This significant period in time was known as the Ha
  • The Red Scare
    The Red Scare Many people label Edgar Allen Poe a horror writer, plain and simple others refer to Poe as the father of the detective story, but over all he´s one Americas greatest writers. His ability of expressing the world in gothic ways, really captures the reader´s attention. Even though he lead a tough life and was known as a sadistic drug addict and alcoholic, he still managed to produce great pieces of literature. Three of his greatest works were "The Tell Tale heart", "The Fall of the Ho
  • The Red Scare
    The Red Scare Many people label Edgar Allen Poe a horror writer, plain and simple others refer to Poe as the father of the detective story, but over all he´s one Americas greatest writers. His ability of expressing the world in gothic ways, really captures the reader´s attention. Even though he lead a tough life and was known as a sadistic drug addict and alcoholic, he still managed to produce great pieces of literature. Three of his greatest works were "The Tell Tale heart", "The Fall of the Ho
  • The Roaring Twenties
    The Roaring Twenties THE ROARING TWENTIES Americans, in the years following the end of World War I found themselves in an era, where the people simply wished to detach themselves from the troubles of Europeans and the rest of the world. During the years of the Twenties, the economy was prosperous, there was widespread social reform, new aspects of culture were established, and people found better ways to improve their lifestyle and enjoy life. The 1920\'s exemplified the changing attitudes of Am
  • Uncletomscabin
    uncletomscabin Analysis of Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe “The book, Uncle Tom\'s Cabin, is thought of as a fantastic, even fanatic, representation of Southern life, most memorable for its emotional oversimplification of the complexities of the slave system,” says Gossett (4). Harriet Beecher Stowe describes her own experiences or ones that she has witnessed in the past through the text in her novel. She grew up in Cincinnati where she had a very close look at slavery. Located on the
  • Walt WHitman
    Walt WHitman Walt Whitman was looked upon as the forerunner of 20th Century poetry, praising democracy, and becoming a proclaimed poet of American democracy. He was known as the “Son of Long Island,” and he loved his country and everything about it. (Current, Williams, Freidel- page 292-293). Whitman lived during the time of the Civil War; a fact that increased his patriotism. Whitman was considered one of the most important American Poets of the 19th Century. (Encyclopedia of World Biography- p
  • Washington irving
    washington irving Irving, Washington (1783-1859), American writer, the first American author to achieve international renown, who created the fictional characters Rip Van Winkle and Ichabod Crane. The critical acceptance and enduring popularity of Irving\'s tales involving these characters proved the effectiveness of the as an American literary form. Born in New York City, Irving studied law at private schools. After serving in several law offices and traveling in Europe for his health from 1804
  • World War I
    World War I World War I The Causes of the War OK, in a nutshell, World War Is cause went as far back as the early 1800s. People controlled by other nations began to evolve peoples feelings of nationalism. The French Revolution of 1789 brought a new feeling to the word Nationalism. People who spoke French, German, Italian, ext. felt that they should have a separate government in a country where everyone spoke the same language. Unfortunately, we cant please everyone and this demand they had wa
  • World War I
    World War I World War I The Causes of the War OK, in a nutshell, World War Is cause went as far back as the early 1800s. People controlled by other nations began to evolve peoples feelings of nationalism. The French Revolution of 1789 brought a new feeling to the word Nationalism. People who spoke French, German, Italian, ext. felt that they should have a separate government in a country where everyone spoke the same language. Unfortunately, we cant please everyone and this demand they had wa
  • Electrocardiogram
    electrocardiogram Electrocardiogram Lab Introduction Electrocardiograms are used to obtain information about the function of the heart. An ECG is a recording of the electrical activity of the heart made from electrodes placed on the surface of the skin. Salt solutions are good conductors of electricity and can transfer electrical activity to the skins surface. An ECG tracing shows the sum of the electrical potentials generated by all the cells of the heart at any moment (Silverthorn, 1998). Each
  • Laminitis in Horses
    Laminitis in Horses Laminitis in Horses ABSTRACT: Laminitis is a painful and serious disease that can cause lameness in horses. It is an inflammation of the laminae. The Laminae is tissue that connects coffin bone and the wall of the hoof. Laminitis can occur in any horse, usually obese horses, and ponies. It is caused by changes of horses\' feed, lush grass, retained placenta, intake of cold water while horse is still hot, surgery, trauma to the hoof, riding on hard ground. Key Words: Laminitis
  • D Caries
    D Caries Introduction Caries have been a constant nuisance to humans, decaying teeth can become a major problem for those affected. It is certainly not the oldest pathology, nor the one of the greatest prevalence throughout humankind, but the information that can be extrapolate from such pathologies is great. The aim of this paper is to outline the pathology of caries and the influence that these have had on the human populations affected. Caries or caries dentium is the common name for tooth de
  • Ethnography of the city
    ethnography of the city Ethnography in the City: Phillipe Bourgois and the Barrio Cities exist for many reasons and the diversity of urban form and function can be traced to the complex roles that cities perform. Cities serve as centers of storage, commerce, and industry. The agricultural surplus from the surrounding country hinterland is processed and distributed within the city. Urban areas have also developed around marketplaces, where imported goods from distant places could be exchanged for
  • Home bases and Early hominids
    Home bases and Early hominids “Home Bases and Early Hominids” is an article that looks at the earlier studies that suggests early hominids living in home bases and the new studies that may suggest different. The first archaeological sites from the Late Pliocene to the Lower Pliocene represented home bases suggesting that early hominids shifted their way of life to a way of life like present hunter and gathers (Potts, 338). However recent studies done from Olduvai Gorge suggests there are possibl
  • JESUS AND CHRISTOLOGY
    JESUS AND CHRISTOLOGY Theologians and philosophers have been trying to question who Jesus is for hundreds of year now. This time in the form of what is called the contemporary study of Christology. The thrust of Christology is somewhat dependent upon which theologian one reads. Hans Kung calls his approach Christology from below. Others simply focus on the crucifixion and the resurrection of Christ (Cunningham); others are exploring His life and work on earth (Imbelli). Some deny the fact that J
  • Bruce Goffs Bavinger House
    Bruce Goffs Bavinger House Introduction: Bruce Goff¡¦s working career spanned sixty-six years, from 1916, when he began working in an architect¡¦s office, until his death in 1982. During that time he received more than 450 commissions for buildings and related designs, resulting in more than 500 proposals of which at least 147 were realized. Bruce Goff occupied a unique place in American architecture. His buildings looked like those of no other architect. His idiosyncratic designs juxtaposed sha
  • Steinbeck
    steinbeck John Steinbeck A Common Man’s Man “I never wrote two books alike”, once said John Steinbeck (Shaw, 10). That may be true, but I think that he wrote many of his novels and short stories based on many of the same views. He often focused on social problems, like the “haves” verses the “have nots", and made the reader want to encourage the underdog. Steinbeck’s back ground and concern for the common man made him one of the best writers for human rights. John Steinbeck was born in Salians,