Expansion Of Nato

This essay has a total of 695 words and 4 pages.

Expansion Of Nato


NATO starts the year 2000 with the issue of concern. The European Allies' defense
capability, stabilization efforts in the Balkans, and relations with Russia are at the top
of a highly charged agenda.


In 1999 NATO accomplished many tasks, which were reviewed in the December 15th Washington
Summit. They approved an updated Strategic Concept at the Washington Summit; admitted as
new members the Czech Republic, Hungary, and Poland; contributed decisively, in particular
through the conduct of their air campaign and the subsequent deployment of KFOR (NATO-led
international peace force), to the international community's objective of creating the
basis for long-term peace and stability in Kosovo.


What is NATO? NATO is the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. The North Atlantic Treaty
was signed in Washington on April 4th, 1949, creating an alliance of 12 independent
nations committed to each other's defense. Four more European nations later acceded to the
Treaty between 1952 and 1982. The now 19 members of NATO include Belgium, Canada, *Czech
Republic, Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, *Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Luxembourg,
Netherlands, Norway, *Poland, Portugal, Spain, Turkey, United Kingdom, and the United
States. (*Members since March 12, 1999) These countries commit themselves to maintaining
and developing their defense capabilities, individually, and collectively, providing the
basis for collective defense planning. The Treaty also provides the framework for
consultation between the member countries whenever they feel that their national security
is at risk.


Over the past few years, Russia and Ukraine have developed special independent
relationships with the Alliance. This enables them to pursue, in different ways,
cooperative programs on a wide range of practical security-related issues of benefit to
their countries and to Europe as a whole. Both countries are members of the Euro-Atlantic
Partnership Council (EAPC). NATO continues to attach importance to discussions and
practical co-operation with Russia. Their aim remains to establish a strong, stable and
enduring partnership within the framework of the NATO-Russia Founding Act.


NATO encourages Russia to resume co-operation on the broad range of issues foreseen in the
Founding Act and to engage actively in the EAPC and the Partnership for Peace. NATO also
emphasizes that the further development of their co-operation depends on Russia's respect
for international norms and obligations.


There are still concerns about the conflict in Chechnya. NATO condemns, in particular,
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