Compare and Constrast Essay on Federalism

This essay has a total of 1223 words and 5 pages.

federalism

Federalism
The United States Government is beloved to all Americans, in the simple fact that all men
are created equal and all men are given equal opportunity, to aspire to achieve success
and make their dreams come true. Although the percentage of people who achieve all of
their goals in life is fairly small, they have the freedom to chase them and America for
the most part is a pretty content place. The "law of the land" that sets the standards for
our rights and privileges is the U.S. Constitution.

As pretty and proper as the U.S. Constitution sounds, there has always been and always
will be some conflicts and concerns about different laws and amendments and even values
that make a part of the sacred text of America. One of the major conflicts when writing
the Constitution was power. They weren't sure what to do with it, or how to handle it.
America was so big with all different states a having all different values. America was
not one, it was thirteen individual states who each wanted a piece of the power.

This is where the idea of Federalism comes into play. The definition of Federalism goes as
follows; Federalism is the philosophy that power should be divided between the central
powers and all its constituents. In other words the power of the United States should not
all be in the hands of the national government, each state should have a say in the way
that they want their own state to run. Every state wants to progress in a different way,
and every state wants to progress at a different speed. However when problems get to large
for a single state run government to handle, the national (federal) government will
proceed to step in and set forth the necessary measures to control the situation.

The founding fathers were quite concerned when writing the Constitution about what the
breakdown of power should be. They did not want the central government to hold too much
power like it had in England, but they needed a federal government stronger than the
Articles of Confederation to keep the states together.

When reading the Constitution you see many examples of compromises between the power of
the federal government and the power of the states. There are limits set on for states,
limits set on Congress, and even limits set on the power of the President. For instance
the Constitution states that the President has the power to overrule almost any decision,
or matter that has to do with the United States, both in internal matters and foreign
relations. However with all the power that the President possesses there are also many
limits set on him, including the length of time he is allowed to hold his job. However the
President who runs the entire country, is appointed by the states.

This power and compromise is also included amongst the Congress. Each state appoints
members of the legislature. Each state gets an equal numbers of electors in the Senate and
the House of Representatives. The President is also required to take an oath before he
takes over in office. "I do solemnly swear that I will faithfully execute the Office of
President of the United States, and will to the best of my Ability, preserve, 1'protect,
Continues for 3 more pages >>




  • Characterization of Democratic Republicans
    Characterization of Democratic Republicans The Democratic Republicans were almost always characterized as believing in following the strict construction of the constitution. They were opposed to the loose interpretation the Federalists used. The presidencies of Jefferson and Madison proved this characterization to be somewhat accurate. It is true that both Jefferson and Madison supported the ideas of the Democratic Rebublicans but, they also did many things that contradicted them. In Thomas Jeff
  • Marbury vs Madison
    Marbury vs Madison As the government was newly establishing its stronghold on the nation, forging its way to a powerful republic and instituting precedents for the future, a struggle to preserve the foundations of American Society instituted by Washington and John Adams existed as Thomas Jefferson took office. In an attempt to maintain the edifice of the National Government believing Jefferson would topple the prestigious nation with his atheist views, Adams appointed various Federalists to th
  • Trail of Tears
    Trail of Tears The Federalists vs. The Anti-Federalists When the revolutionary war was over, the American colonists had found themselves free of British domination. Due to the fact that they were free from British control, they wanted to create their own system of government where tyranny would be practically diminished. Originally, the separate states were connected by The Articles of Confederation. But this document gave the central government no power of their own. Because of this, the states
  • Westward expansionin nineteenth century
    westward expansionin nineteenth century THE WESTWARD EXPANSION Introduction The Westward Expansion has often been regarded as the central theme of American history, down to the end of the19th century and as the main factor in the shaping of American history. As Frederick Jackson Turner says, the greatest force or influence in shaping American democracy and society had been that there was so much free land in America and this profoundly affected American society. Motives After the revolution, the
  • Millennium
    millennium rom Fear of Frying and other Fax of Life By Josh Freed I was sitting at a busy New York café a few months ago when a young woman approached my table. "Excuse me," she said. "I hate to be so bold, but could I possibly ask you what you\'re eating, if you don\'t mind me asking." In a flash, I knew-she was Canadian!-and I said so. "Gee!" she said." "How did you guess?" Because no one but a Canadian could have asked such a convoluted question. A Parisienne would simply have eyed my meal in
  • Death penalty1
    death penalty1 Institutions The main idea in this essay, I believe, is how institutions can be so complex with their chain of laws, traditions, custom ideas that provide structure and order of political life. Civilization evolves and changes, and crafted by people who would mold institutions by their own ideology or philosophical view of politics. Political theorists, who writes in a period of chaos and anarchy, and believes politics is a power game, and life is reduced to avoid a pain and seek
  • Debates Over Slavery
    Debates Over Slavery Debates Over Slavery In 1787, delegates arrived in Philadelphia to begin work on revising the Articles of Confederation. Most states agreed that the Articles had not provided the country with the type of guidelines that it needed to run smoothly. There were many things missing, and many issues that needed further consideration. One of the most controversial topics at the Constitutional Convention was figuring out the country\'s policy towards slavery. When all was said and d
  • Executive Orders
    Executive Orders Orders Issued by President Bill Clinton What are Executive Orders? Executive Orders are official documents, Executive numbered consecutively, through which the President of the United States manages the operations of the Federal Government. Some Executive Orders in the past have created new commissions, councils, task forces and committees; issued and allocated bonds; authorized permit issuance; etc. 40 Executive Orders issued by President Clinton Date Document Titles 1. 2000-12
  • Supreme courts reactivity to popular will in moder
    supreme courts reactivity to popular will in modern times The Supreme Court safeguards much of its power by creating walls to separate its power from public opinion and political pandering. And while impartiality is undoubtedly the preeminent characteristic desirable in a justice, it is impossible to nominate a human being that is not at least partially fallible and swayed by the society around him. The Warren Court of 1953 to 1969 perfectly illustrates the concurrent philosophies of the Court w
  • A Revisionist perspective of the election of Thoma
    A Revisionist perspective of the election of Thomas Jefferson The Election of Thomas Jefferson Consensus historians paint Thomas Jefferson as the great father of democracy, referring to his election to the presidency as the “revolution of 1800.” In actuality, Thomas Jefferson was an inconsistent man, who was philosophically against the Federalists, but who did not bring about any significant political or ideological changes during his presidency. Recently, revisionist historians have begun to qu
  • Federalism and the Civil War
    Federalism and the Civil War John C. Calhoun was a man of very high stature and intelligence. His ideas and thoughts were expressed very sternly and backed up with concrete evidence. Of course not everyone agreed with Calhoun’s thoughts and procedures. The man knew himself and his ideas would somehow make a difference in the way that Canada and the United States would grow and be governed. At the time in which John was voicing his opinions many different issues were in the hot seat. A major conc
  • George Washmgton
    George Washmgton GEORGE WASHINGTON Biography George Washington was born on Feb. 22, 1732 (Feb. 11, 1731/2, old style) in Westmoreland County, Va. While in his teens, he trained as a surveyor, and at the age of 20 he was appointed adjutant in the Virginia militia. For the next three years, he fought in the wars against the French and Indians, serving as Gen. Edward Braddock\'s aide in the disastrous campaign against Fort Duquesne. In 1759, he resigned from the militia, married Martha Dandridge Cu
  • Marbury vs Madison
    Marbury vs Madison Marbury V. Madison As the government was newly establishing its stronghold on the nation, forging its way to a powerful republic and instituting precedents for the future, a struggle to preserve the foundations of American Society instituted by Washington and John Adams existed as Thomas Jefferson took office. In an attempt to maintain the “edifice of the National Government” believing Jefferson would topple the prestigious nation with his atheist views, Adams appointed variou
  • Russian communism
    Russian communism RUSSIAN communisiunm By: mike Introduction The fall of the Communist regime in the Soviet Union was more than a political event. The powerful interaction and fusion between politics and economics that characterized the state socialist system created a situation that was unique for the successor states of the Soviet Union. The penetration of the Communist regime into every facet of life left the Russian people with little democratic traditions. Russia faces the seemingly impract
  • Separation in Canada
    Separation in Canada Canadian National Unity has been a serious debate to all Canadians for close to three decades now. Starting with French President Charles DeGaulle, who in visiting Quebec told a large crowd in Motreal, “Vivre le Quebec libre!” or, “Live in a free Quebec.” This one event started the whole modern separtist movement in Canada, and brought us to where we are now. They went from one person with an idea then, to 2 provincial parties, and a federal one as well, now. This is a very
  • The Misunderstood
    The Misunderstood Sadly, modern Americans seem to have done a better job preserving what Thomas Jefferson has left us in bricks and mortar than we have preserving his ideas. Tourists visiting Charlottesville, Virginia, can witness firsthand the ongoing efforts to preserve Jefferson\'s home at Monticello as well as his splendid little "Academical Village," the Lawn, which is still a vital center of student life at the University of Virginia. Further down the road, near Lynchburg, Virginia, preser
  • Gerrymanderingto kill a mocking bird
    Gerrymanderingto kill a mocking bird Scott Colson Chris O\'Connell To Kill A Mockingbird March 5, 2000 GOMILLION ET AL. v. LIGHTFOOT, MAYOR OF TUSKEGEE, ET AL. The unprecedented Gomillion v. Lightfoot came to the Supreme Court because the borders of Tuskegee, Alabama were redrawn. They went from a square shape to an irregular one to exclude black neighborhoods, on the outer edges of the city, violating the 15th Amendment, denying them a vote because of race. This practice is also known as racial
  • American fed
    american fed American federalism is a form of government in which the constitution distributes governmental powers between the national government and the subsidiary governments of the states. Article I, Section 8, and the Tenth Amendment are good examples of this definition. In Article I, Section 8, the Constitution defines the powers delegated to the national government, such as the power to regulate commerce and to enact laws necessary and proper for the execution of its powers. The Tenth Ame
  • Asdfg
    asdfg Search Live! Shopping Raging Bull Free Internet Access Email Find: Language: any languageEnglishChineseCzechDanishDutchEstonianFinnishFrenchGermanGreekHebrewHungarianIcelandicItalianJapaneseKoreanLatvianLithuanianNorwegianPolishPortugueseRomanianRussianSpanishSwedish " Help " Family Filter is off " Language Settings Advanced Web Search Click the products tab to earn shopping rewards. What is a tab? Products News Discussions The Web Images MP3/Audio Video Directories Web Pages 638 pages fou
  • Environmental Policy Versus The Economy
    Environmental Policy Versus The Economy Environmental policy versus the economy It is in the ring set up by greedy corporations and enviro tree huggers where the top card is the economy versus the environment. To help gain support, the economy yells, “The Green groups may decry economic growth, but it is growth itself that makes environmental protection possible and popular…pollution is as old as human activity, but only recently have we been rich enough to worry about it”.10 On the other side,
  • Federalism in political culture
    federalism in political culture The Significance of Federalism in Political Culture The United States government is constructed of many systems and ideas which, when bound together, create the Democratic government utilized by the country. All of the different things, in most cases compliment each other and therefore, work together. Two examples of this are the system of federalism and the idea of political culture. They make up some of the important aspects of the government and its operation.
  • Federalist Papers
    Federalist Papers The Federalist Papers and Federalism The Federalist Papers were mostly the product of two young men: Alexander Hamilton of New York, age 32, and James Madison of Virginia, age 36. Both men sometimes wrote four papers in a single week. An older scholar, John Jay, later named as first chief justice of the Supreme Court, wrote five of the papers. Hamilton, who had been an aide to Washington during the Revolution, asked Madison and Jay to help him in this project. Their purpose was
  • Finale
    Finale The United States has been a super power for many years now. Will they continue to be so??? Part of this reason is that since gaining world leadership it has had an enormous impact in trading affairs. To determine foreign policy factions with the most influence around contribute to determining what goes where as they are involved in business and moneymaking. Out of these are trade groups being the most important. The nations partial success has been due to the fact that it preferably trad
  • Gay Rights to Marriage
    Gay Rights to Marriage Crystal Bloom Miss Hahn English 1113 November 22, 2000 Gays Should Have the Right My aunt, who lives in Missouri, has had a loving partner for about four years. They are both lesbians and want to get married someday when the law allows. I asked them to send me a letter on some of their thoughts on same-sex marriage. Out of her four-page letter I pulled this reply out, "If two people of the same sex choose to make a life together I feel that they should have the same rights
  • How the United States Government does not truly re
    How the United States Government does not truly reflect a federalist system I believe that the United States Constitution does not truly reflect a federalist system. In fact, I believe that the federalist system, in which states have considerable power to exercise, was all but abolished by the United States Constitution. In answering this question, “American Government,” by Peter Wolf, gives a few examples of what Federalism meant back in the late 1700’s, and why, during the framing of the Const
  • Institutional
    institutional Institutions The main idea in this essay, I believe, is how institutions can be so complex with their chain of laws, traditions, custom ideas that provide structure and order of political life. Civilization evolves and changes, and crafted by people who would mold institutions by their own ideology or philosophical view of politics. Political theorists, who writes in a period of chaos and anarchy, and believes politics is a power game, and life is reduced to avoid a pain and seek p
  • The Effects Corruption and Assassinations have on
    The Effects Corruption and Assassinations have on the Prologue Days after the murder, when the prisoners began naming Raul Salinas de Gortari as the mastermind of the killing, Mario Ruiz Massieu-whohad told me that he was in constant touch with President Salinas and talked to him almost daily-must have told Salinas, “Mr. President, we have a problem: Your brother killed my brother.” (Oppenheimer 200) Introduction The trafficking of drugs is clearly a "big business" in the current Mexican economy
  • The philly election of 1794
    the philly election of 1794 The Swanwick-Fitzsimmons election in Philadelphia of the most infamous elections in American history due to the fact that, it brought with it the first distinction ever between two political parties, the Federalists and the Democrats. Subsequently the election of 1794 brought America it\'s first democratic congressional leader, John Swanwick. The factors surrounding Swanwick\'s congressional debut were national issues, local issues, yellow fever epidemic, the Whiskey
  • The right to bear arms
    the right to bear arms WORKS CITED [1] Cottrol, Robert, ed. Gun Control and the Constitution: Sources and Explorations on the Second Amendment. New York: Garland Publishing Inc., 1994 [2] Dowlut, Robert. The Right to Keep and Bear Arms in State Bills of Rights and Judicial Interpretation. SAF 1993 [3] Freedman, Warren. The Privilege to Keep and Bear Arms. Connecticut: Quorum Books, 1989 [4] Hickok, Eugene Jr., ed. The Bill of Rights: Original Meaning and Current Understanding. Virginia: Universi
  • Federalism Essay
    Federalism Essay Federalism is a political system comprised of several local units of government and one national government that can both make decisions with respect to at least some governmental activities and whose existence is specially protected. Sovereignty is shared so that on some matters the national government is supreme, and on some matters the state governments are supreme. But in the last twenty-five years, the increase of federal mandates on state and local governments has shifted
  • American Politics in Transition
    American Politics in Transition American Politics in Transition For the United States, as for most states in the world, the 1980s and 1990s were a time of change and challenge. During this period the effects of change both within the US and internationally acted as push factors in many areas of life, including economics and politics. This sudden change was primarily due to global shocks and recessions, increased foreign economic competition, the end of the Cold War and the demise of the Soviet
  • Canadian Interest Groups
    Canadian Interest Groups Interest group representation in Canada identifies society\'s influence on the governing body and the policies decided upon in the legislative setting. The composition of interest groups has evolved over time and has lead to study of three distinct approaches to the power the representational groups have. The growth and change of interests in the Canadian state are dependent upon the structure between societal and government values. An interest group refers to "a group o
  • Federalism
    federalism Federalism Basicly Federalism is a way of setting up a government with multiple layers so that there is more than one level that has authority over the people. Different types of government share the power associated with running a county. In the United States our two main layers of government lie between the states and the federal aspects. Our federal system not only decentralizes our politics but also our polices. We elect leaders and representatives on a statewide level and create
  • Federalism in Political Culture
    Federalism in Political Culture The Significance of Federalism in Political Culture The United States government is constructed of many systems and ideas which, when bound together, create the Democratic government utilized by the country. All of the different things, in most cases compliment each other and therefore, work together. Two examples of this are the system of federalism and the idea of political culture. They make up some of the important aspects of the government and its operation.
  • Federalism1
    federalism1 Federalism When the revolutionary war was over, the American colonists had found themselves free of British domination. Due to the fact that they were free from British control, they wanted to create their own system of government where tyranny would be practically diminished. Originally, The Articles of Confederation connected the separate states. But this document gave the central government no power of it’s own. Because of this, the states had many problems in international politi
  • Federalism
    federalism Federalism Basicly Federalism is a way of setting up a government with multiple layers so that there is more than one level that has authority over the people. Different types of government share the power associated with running a county. In the United States our two main layers of government lie between the states and the federal aspects. Our federal system not only decentralizes our politics but also our polices. We elect leaders and representatives on a statewide level and create
  • Hamiltons Crusade
    Hamiltons Crusade When the revolutionary war was over, the American colonists found themselves free of British control. Now that they were free, they wanted to create their own system of government where the tyranny and the arbitrariness of the British monarchy of old, would be diminished. Originally, The Articles of Confederation thinly united the thirteen states. This document had given the central government no power to do what was needed. The central government had no power to tax they only
  • Is China Unstable
    Is China Unstable Is China Unstable? Foreign Policy Research Institute Wire, July 1999 By Minxin Pei Western attitudes toward China tend to oscillate between two extremes, often with confusing rapidity. Not too long ago China was widely portrayed as an emerging military and economic threat to the West. Its total economic output was projected to surpass that of the United States in two decades. Its military modernization was expected to provide China the capability to project its power far beyond
  • Richard Freed
    Mr3 Richard Freed Topic 8: Federalism Is the federal division of powers an obstruction to good governance in the United States? The federal division of powers does not provide an obstruction to good governance in the US. For this argument to hold, federal division of power and good governance will be defined. This division provides for different levels of government representing the interests of the people rather than there being further layers of bureaucracy. Different examples will be used to
  • Seperation of Powers
    Seperation of Powers The Judicial Branch in Regard to Separation of Powers The Doctrine of Separation of powers is that political power should be divided among several bodies as a precaution against tyranny. The ideal is opposed the absolute sovereignty of the Crown, Parliament, or any other body. The blueprint for United States’ separation of powers is laid out in the U.S. Constitution and expanded upon in the Federalist Papers. The checks and balances of the US government involve the horizonta
  • The Power of the Declaration
    The Power of the Declaration Power and The Declaration of Independence There are many abstractions in the Declaration of Independence. These abstractions such as: rights, freedom, liberty and happiness have become the foundations of American society and have helped to shape the “American Identity.” Power, another abstraction that reoccurs in all the major parts of the Declaration of Independence plays an equally important role in shaping “American Identity.” One forgets the abstraction of power,
  • Abstractions in PowerWriting
    Abstractions in PowerWriting Abstractions in Power-Writing There are many abstractions in the Declaration of Independence. These abstractions such as: rights, freedom, liberty and happiness have become the foundations of American society and have helped to shape the "American Identity." Power, another abstraction that reoccurs in all the major parts of the Declaration of Independence plays an equally important role in shaping "America identity." One forgets the abstraction of power, because it a
  • Violence1
    violence1 rom Fear of Frying and other Fax of Life By Josh Freed I was sitting at a busy New York café a few months ago when a young woman approached my table. "Excuse me," she said. "I hate to be so bold, but could I possibly ask you what you\'re eating, if you don\'t mind me asking." In a flash, I knew-she was Canadian!-and I said so. "Gee!" she said." "How did you guess?" Because no one but a Canadian could have asked such a convoluted question. A Parisienne would simply have eyed my meal in
  • Government
    Government 2. We know that the fundamental difference between ancient political science and modern political science has to do with the relationship of the individual to the state. For Aristotle, a person was an inherently political animal. For modern political philosophers (social contract theorists), individual rights existed prior to the formation of government. Understanding this vital distinction, identify and explain Aristotles forms of government. Discuss how the One, The Few and the Ma
  • Federalists VS Jeffersoneans
    Federalists VS Jeffersoneans With respect to the federal Constitution, the Jeffersonian Republicans are usually characterized as strict constructionists who were opposed to the broad constructionism of the Federalists. As history dictates, this is found to be substantially accurate. Federalists were firm believers in the production of a strong central government and a broad interpretation of the Constitution. However, the Democratic Republicans believed that the government should follow a stric
  • JEFFERSONIAN REPUBLICANISM
    JEFFERSONIAN REPUBLICANISM After the extreme partisanship of 1800, it was expected by supporters and foes alike that the presidential administration of Thomas Jefferson would pioneer substantial and even radical changes. The federal government was now in the hands of a relentless man and a persistent party that planned to diminish its size and influence. But although he overturned the principal Federalist domestic and foreign policies, Thomas Jefferson generally pursued the course as a chief ex
  • Marbury vs Madison
    Marbury vs Madison As the government was newly establishing its stronghold on the nation, forging its way to a powerful republic and instituting precedents for the future, a struggle to preserve the foundations of American Society instituted by Washington and John Adams existed as Thomas Jefferson took office. In an attempt to maintain the edifice of the National Government believing Jefferson would topple the prestigious nation with his atheist views, Adams appointed various Federalists to t
  • None Provided12
    None Provided12 THE AMERICAS TO 1500 I. Methodology in the History This period, which deals with the world the Indians knew before the arrival of European explorers, poses difficulties flowing mostly from the lack of the usual evidentiary foundation for doing history: written documents (for example, letters, speeches, treaties, constitutions, laws, books, newspapers, magazines, almanacs). This lack need not be a major obstacle to historical study, however. Indeed, one of the most important thin
  • The life of william rufus king
    the life of william rufus king Hampton University Hampton, VA 23668 The Life and Times of William Rufus de Vane King Presented To Mr. Gene Moore In Partial Fulfillment for the Requirements Of POL 399-01 By Sharri D. Mapp 8142 on April 18, 2001 William Rufus de Vane King was a distinguished politician who concluded his remarkable political career by being elected the Vice-President under Franklin Pierce’s pro-slavery ticket. However, he is the only person to be elected to that office that never
  • SinoRussian Forum
    SinoRussian Forum Chapter1. Historical Retrospection of Sino-USSR Trade Sino-R.S.S.R trade started even before the establishment of the People’s Republic of China. In August 1946, the Chinese Communist Party Northeast Bureau reached an agreement with the Soviet Union to exchange clothes, medicine and other daily necessities with foodstuff. At the end of the year, a small-scale trade began. The trade relation between China and USSR had experienced great changes since the establishment of the Peo