Forest Fires Essay

This essay has a total of 346 words and 2 pages.

Forest Fires


In the year 2000, fire fighters battled raging infernos as some of the worst wildfires in
50 years rampaged across a dozen states. Not only were these fires the worst in half a
century, but they may be the worst ever recorded.

In a single week in mid August, 86 major wildfires were raging in a dozen states from
Arizona and California up to Colorado and Wyoming to Montana, Oregon and South Dakota.
Five million acres of land burned, more then double the annual average for the past
decade. A controlled fire six miles southwest of Los Alamos that was implemented as a fire
prevention measure would not stop. First consuming dry grass, then ponderosa pines, then
gobbling up hundreds of homes and buildings, the fire spread through Los Alamos, the home
of the atom bomb. Some 20,000 people had to be evacuated and luckily the fires never came
close to a building that held drums of transuranium mixed waste and a metric ton of
plutonium. Noxious fumes wafted from the lead paint, rubber and plastics in burning cars
and buildings.

Due to the destructive wildfires, interest in fuel management to reduce fire control costs
and damages has been renewed. Although several tools, such as prescribed burning and
salvage timber sales can address these problems, the extent of the problem and the cost of
needed treatments are generally unknown. There are few documented estimates of the decline
in control costs or damages associated with fuel treatments.
Continues for 1 more page >>




  • Costa Rica
    Costa Rica Greg Coffta Bio190/Costa Rican Adventures 11/30/1999 Part I Banana: Bananas were most likely picked up by the European traders in Southeast Asia when in search for spices. Soon, as the discovery of the Tropics arrived, traders took bananas to Central America. Breadfruit: this fruit commonly grows among the southern Pacific islands, and it probably found its way to Costa Rica when the natives started to explore on boat. Chocolate: as far as I could find, chocolate is native to Central
  • The biosphere
    the biosphere The Biosphere: The biosphere is part of the earth in which life exists. It is 20 km thick from the bottom of the ocean to the lower atmosphere. It consists of three layers: the lithosphere, which is the land on the surface of the earth; the hydrosphere, which comprises of the water on the earth as well as water vapor in the air; and the atmosphere, which is made up of the air that surrounds the earth. The living organisms in the biosphere interact and affect each other in many ways
  • Ecosystem
    Ecosystem Ecosystem: An ecosystem is the complex of living organisms, their physical environment, and all their interrelationships in a particular unit of space. The principles underlying the study of ecosystems are based on the view that all the elements of a life-supporting environment of any size, whether natural or man-made, are parts of an integral network in which each element interacts directly or indirectly with all others and affects the function of the whole. All ecosystems are contain
  • Amazon Rainforest
    Amazon Rainforest Science; Rainforests and Earth The Tropical Rainforests of the World In this term paper, I will explain the great importance of the tropical Rainforests around the world and discuss the effects of the tragedy of rainforest destruction and the effect that it is having on the earth. I will talk about the efforts being made to help curb the rate of rainforest destruction and the peoples of the rainforest, and I will explore a new topic in the fight to save the rainforest, habitat
  • Ecological Succession
    Ecological Succession Ecological Succession The world around us is slowly and constantly changing. We might never see the small alterations happen, but many years later changes will surly be visible. Over time small changes add up and soon the whole ecosystem is different. This slow change in the land and habitat is called ecological succession. Animals, plants, and weather are some factors that cause this type of change in an ecosystem. Ecological succession begins with a pioneer community. In
  • Niton
    niton Aguilar, S. and R. Condit. In press. Uso de arboles natios por una communidad de campesinos en Panama. Biotropica. Appanah, S. and G. Weinland. 1993. A Preliminary Analysis of the 50-hectare Pasoh Demography Plot: I. Dipterocarpaceae. Research Pamphlet No. 112. Kepong, Malaysia: Forest Research Institute of Malaysia. Appanah, S., A.H. Gentry, and J.V. LaFrankie. 1993. Liana diversity and species richness of Malayan rain forests. Journal of Tropical Forest Science 6(2): 116-123. Ashton, P.S
  • Rainforest
    rainforest The Tropical Rainforests of the World In this term paper, I will explain the great importance of the tropical Rainforests around the world and discuss the effects of the tragedy of rainforest destruction and the effect that it is having on the earth. I will talk about the efforts being made to help curb the rate of rainforest destruction and the peoples of the rainforest, and I will explore a new topic in the fight to save the rainforest, habitat fragmentation. Another topic being dis
  • Rainforest1
    rainforest1 The Tropical Rainforests of the World In this term paper, I will explain the great importance of the tropical Rainforests around the world and discuss the effects of the tragedy of rainforest destruction and the effect that it is having on the earth. I will talk about the efforts being made to help curb the rate of rainforest destruction and the peoples of the rainforest, and I will explore a new topic in the fight to save the rainforest, habitat fragmentation. Another topic being di
  • Rainforest2
    rainforest2 The Tropical Rainforests of the World In this term paper, I will explain the great importance of the tropical Rainforests around the world and discuss the effects of the tragedy of rainforest destruction and the effect that it is having on the earth. I will talk about the efforts being made to help curb the rate of rainforest destruction and the peoples of the rainforest, and I will explore a new topic in the fight to save the rainforest, habitat fragmentation. Another topic being di
  • The biosphere
    the biosphere The Biosphere: The biosphere is part of the earth in which life exists. It is 20 km thick from the bottom of the ocean to the lower atmosphere. It consists of three layers: the lithosphere, which is the land on the surface of the earth; the hydrosphere, which comprises of the water on the earth as well as water vapor in the air; and the atmosphere, which is made up of the air that surrounds the earth. The living organisms in the biosphere interact and affect each other in many ways
  • The Homebase theory
    The Homebase theory Glynn Isaac Defines "the Homebase Hypothesis" It has been argued since Darwin\'s day that the great apes were man\'s nearest living relatives, and as evidence emerged during the late 1960\'s of the hunting propensities and simple tool use of chimpanzees (Goodall 1986), anthropologists found more and more reason to presume similarity of behavior between modern (e.g., Pan troglodytes or Pan panicus) and ancient varieties of hominids (Tanner 1981). Still, modern humans are not c
  • The Current State of Devlopment in LAtin America
    The Current State of Devlopment in LAtin America In attempting to establish the current state of development in Latin America, historical chronology serves as the foundation necessary for a comprehensively logical position. Latin American development has evolved in distinct phases, which lead to the present day standings of the politics and peoples throughout the region. The culmination of distinct historical attributes: conquest, colonialism, mercantilism, captalism, industrialism, and globalis
  • The biosphere
    the biosphere The Biosphere: The biosphere is part of the earth in which life exists. It is 20 km thick from the bottom of the ocean to the lower atmosphere. It consists of three layers: the lithosphere, which is the land on the surface of the earth; the hydrosphere, which comprises of the water on the earth as well as water vapor in the air; and the atmosphere, which is made up of the air that surrounds the earth. The living organisms in the biosphere interact and affect each other in many ways
  • The boisphere
    the boisphere The Biosphere: The biosphere is part of the earth in which life exists. It is 20 km thick from the bottom of the ocean to the lower atmosphere. It consists of three layers: the lithosphere, which is the land on the surface of the earth; the hydrosphere, which comprises of the water on the earth as well as water vapor in the air; and the atmosphere, which is made up of the air that surrounds the earth. The living organisms in the biosphere interact and affect each other in many ways
  • The Tropical Rainforests of the World
    The Tropical Rainforests of the World In this term paper, I will explain the great importance of the tropical Rainforests around the world and discuss the effects of the tragedy of rainforest destruction and the effect that it is having on the earth. I will talk about the efforts being made to help curb the rate of rainforest destruction and the peoples of the rainforest, and I will explore a new topic in the fight to save the rainforest, habitat fragmentation. Another topic being discussed is t
  • Pakistans Case Study
    Pakistans Case Study The Severity and Extent of Environmental Scarcity in Pakistan INTRODUCTION: The Land and Its People Pakistan, which means "land of the pure", is a predominantly Muslim state located in the northwest of the Indian subcontinent. Extending from the northern Himalayan mountain ranges one thousand miles down to the Arabian Sea, it is bounded on the northwest by the mountain ranges of Koh Sulaiman and by Afghanistan and on the southwest by the Iranian section of Baluchistan. In t
  • The west
    the west On Jan. 24, 1855, Henry David Thoreau sat down to his journal to reflect on all the ways his homeland had changed since the first English colonists had arrived on the shores of Massachusetts two centuries earlier. For several days, Thoreau had been reading the accounts of some of the earliest settlers. Compared to the America they had found, Thoreau reflected, his experience in the forests was like listening to a symphony played without most of the instruments. As he further considered
  • The west
    The west The West that was, and the West that can be by Dan Flores On Jan. 24, 1855, Henry David Thoreau sat down to his journal to reflect on all the ways his homeland had changed since the first English colonists had arrived on the shores of Massachusetts two centuries earlier. For several days, Thoreau had been reading the accounts of some of the earliest settlers. Compared to the America they had found, Thoreau reflected, his experience in the forests was like listening to a symphony played
  • Pollution1
    pollution1 Freedman defines a pollutant as "the occurrence of toxic substances or energy in a larger quality then the ecological communities or particular species can tolerate without suffering measurable detriment" (Freeman, 562). Although the effects of a pollutant on an organism vary depending on the dose and duration (how long administered). The impact can be one of sub lethality-to-lethality, all dependent upon the factors involved. These factors need to be looked at when determining an ec
  • Rainforest
    rainforest The Tropical Rainforests of the World In this term paper, I will explain the great importance of the tropical Rainforests around the world and discuss the effects of the tragedy of rainforest destruction and the effect that it is having on the earth. I will talk about the efforts being made to help curb the rate of rainforest destruction and the peoples of the rainforest, and I will explore a new topic in the fight to save the rainforest, habitat fragmentation. Another topic being di
  • The End Permian Mass Extinction
    The End Permian Mass Extinction IntroductionThink of a world which existed 290 million years ago. As you look out over the terane in front of you, you think that you are on an alien planet. You see volcanoes spewing ash and lava. Beside them is the ocean which is swarming with many different species of echinoderms, bryozoans and brachiopods. As you look down onto the sea floor you are amazed at the countless number of starfish and urchins. Some animals leave you can\'t even describe and you have
  • Coral reefs
    coral reefs Coral reefs are one of the oldest types of living systems on earth, and certainly one of the most spectacular (Goreau, 1987). They are massive underwater structures formed by the limestone skeletons of tiny invertebrate animals. Reefs house a greater diversity of body forms, chemistry, and animal phyla (thirty-two compared to the eight that inhabit the most biodiversity ecosystems on land). Phyla comprise the second largest category of living things, after kingdoms. Coral animals beg
  • The climate change debate in the United States
    The climate change debate in the United States Outline 1. Overview 2. Uncertainty 3. The Structure of Government 4. Economic Impacts 5. The United States\' Inward Focus 6. The Media 7. Partisan Politics 8. Conclusion Overview Climate change is on the international policy agenda primarily because of warnings from scientists. Their forecasts of a potentially dangerous increase in the average global temperature, fortuitously assisted by unusual weather events, have prompted governments to enter int
  • Effects of Wildfires on Forest Ecosystems
    Effects of Wildfires on Forest Ecosystems Ecological Restoration of Forests and Fires One of the most predominate ecosystems is the forest community. Covering about one-fourth of the land area on Earth, forests consist mainly of trees and other woody vegetation, growing closely together. The trees can be large and densely packed, as they are in the coastal forests of the Pacific Northwest, or they can be relatively small and sparsely scattered, as they are in the dry tropical forests of sub-Saha
  • Introduction To Evolution
    Introduction To Evolution Introduction To Evolution What is Evolution? Evolution is the process by which all living things have developed from primitive organisms through changes occurring over billions of years, a process that includes all animals and plants. Exactly how evolution occurs is still a matter of debate, but there are many different theories and that it occurs is a scientific fact. Biologists agree that all living things come through a long history of changes shaped by physical and
  • An Ecosystems Disturbance By A Pollutant
    an Ecosystems Disturbance By A Pollutant An Ecosystem\'s Disturbance by a Pollutant Paul Cordova L. Lehr December 11, 1995 Freedman defines a pollutant as the occurrence of toxic substances or energy in a larger quality then the ecological communities or particular species can tolerate without suffering measurable detriment (Freeman, 562). Although the effects of a pollutant on an organism vary depending on the dose and duration (how long administered). The impact can be one of sublethality to l
  • Charles Robert Darwin
    Charles Robert Darwin Charles Robert Darwin, who lived from1809 to 1882, was a British scientist, who laid the foundation of modern evolutionary theory with his concept of the development of all forms of life through the slow-working process of natural selection. His work was of major influence on the life and earth sciences and on modern thought in general. Born in Shrewsbury, Shropshire, England, on February 12, 1809, Darwin was the fifth child of a wealthy and sophisticated English family. Hi
  • Landcare Revegetation
    Landcare Revegetation Rehabilitation is the process of reclaiming land for economical or conservation purposes. This process usually involves re-vegetation. The main aim in rehabilitation is to either return the land to a self-sustaining ecosystem or prepare the land for human use, i.e. crops, pastures and plantations. Rehabilitation should take place at a rate that is significantly higher than natural succession. Several principles are implemented for successful rehabilitation. Of these princip
  • Leaf-cutting Ants
    Leaf-cutting Ants One of the most little known species of ants in North America is the leaf-cutter ant. This is mainly because it lives in tropical environments and it is not aggressive to animals or humans if not disturbed. The leaf cutting ant is a social insect. Alone the ant is virtually helpless but with the colony it can be a thing feared by animal and human alike. The leaf-cutting ants have a very important role in the tropical forest. They create and manipulate the environment around the
  • Tropical Rainforests
    Tropical Rainforests The Tropical Rainforests of the World In this paper, I will explain the great importance of the tropical Rainforests around the world and discuss the effects of the tragedy of rainforest destruction and the effect that it is having on the earth. I will talk about the efforts being made to help curb the rate of rainforest destruction and the peoples of the rainforest, and I will explore a new topic in the fight to save the rainforest, habitat fragmentation. Another topic bein
  • The role of fire ecology in plant succession
    The role of fire ecology in plant succession Succession is defined as a directional change in community composition and structure over time (Gurevitch et al, 2002). Succession is either primary or secondary. In primary succession plants grow and colonize earth for the first time. In secondary succession plants inhabit and colonize earth that was once inhabited by plants life. A wildfire is one example of secondary succession. When a disturbance in the environment occurs, such as a wildfire, eith
  • Ecosystems
    ecosystems Factors of Community: 1. Interactions between the climate and topography a. "Rainfall, soil, temperature" 2. The food and resources that grow 3. Other specific resources necessary for a species to survive and adapt to. (Ecological niche) 4. Species interaction 5. Physical disturbances, addition/removal of certain species -These factors determine population sizes of an ecosystem. -Conditions of arctic regions don\'t allow many animals to live there due to the low temperature. Niches: (
  • Science; Rainforests And Earth
    Science; Rainforests And Earth The Tropical Rainforests of the World In this term paper, I will explain the great importance of the tropical Rainforests around the world and discuss the effects of the tragedy of rainforest destruction and the effect that it is having on the earth. I will talk about the efforts being made to help curb the rate of rainforest destruction and the peoples of the rainforest, and I will explore a new topic in the fight to save the rainforest, habitat fragmentation. Ano
  • The End Permian Mass Extinction
    The End Permian Mass Extinction Introduction Think of a world which existed 290 million years ago. As you look out over the terane in front of you, you think that you are on an alien planet. You see volcanoes spewing ash and lava. Beside them is the ocean which is swarming with many different species of echinoderms, bryozoans and brachiopods. As you look down onto the sea floor you are amazed at the countless number of starfish and urchins. Some animals leave you can\'t even describe and you hav