Frederick Douglass Except

This essay has a total of 478 words and 2 pages.

Frederick Douglass

Frederick Douglass once said, "there can be no freedom without education." I believe this
statement is true. During slavery, slaves were kept illiterate so they would not rebel and
become free. Many slaves were stripped from their families at an early age so they would
have no sense of compassion towards family members. Some slaves escaped the brutal and
harsh life of slavery, most who were uneducated. But can there be any real freedom without
education?

Freedom is something many slaves never had the opportunity to witness. They were simply
uneducated, illiterate machines who did whatever they were told. But few fortunate slaves
were given the gift to be educated by someone. One of these fortunate persons was named
Frederick Douglass. Douglass was born a slave. He never had the chance of knowing his
mother. As mentioned before, slaves were stripped from their families, leaving them no
sense of compassion. In the book, The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass,
Douglass says, "Never having enjoyed, to any considerable extent, her soothing presence,
her tender and watchful care, I received the tidings of her death with much of the same
emotions I should have probably felt at the death of a stranger."(2) Douglass secretly met
with his mother about 4 times during his whole life. He said he never really got to know
her being he was only a child and the never had much of a conversation. These sorts of
incidents happened to slaves throughout America and permanently scarred most slaves and
their families.

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