Galileo Galilei Argumentative Essay

This essay has a total of 675 words and 3 pages.

Galileo Galilei

Galileo was an Italian mathematician, astronomer, and physicist. He was born in Pisa,
Italy on February 15, 1564. In the mid 1570's, he and his family moved to Florence and he
started his formal education in a local monastery. He was sent to the University of Pisa
in 1581. While there, he studied medicine and the philosophy of Aristotle until 1585.
During these years at the university, he realized that he never really had any interest in
medicine but that he had a talent for math. It was in 1585 that he convinced his father to
let him leave the university and come home to Florence. Back in Florence, he spent his
time as a tutor and began to doubt the Aristotle's philosophy.


In 1589, he was made professor of mathematics at the University of Pisa where he attended
school. His position also required him to teach astronomy based on Ptolemy's theory that
all planets and the sun revolved around the earth. In 1592, he left the University of Pisa
and went to the University of Padua to become professor of mathematics. During his time
there, he constructed a clumsy thermometer which would have work if he had taken into
consideration atmospheric pressure but it still has a significance in history as being one
of the first measuring instruments in science. He taught he for 18 years and during that
time, became convinced that there was truth in the theory of Nicolaus Copernicus a Polish
astronomer who believed that all planets including earth revolved around the sun.


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