George wells beadle Essay

This essay has a total of 621 words and 3 pages.

george wells beadle

George Wells Beadle was born at Wahoo, Nebraska, U.S.A., October 22, 1903, the son of
Chauncey Elmer Beadle, a farmer, and his wife Hattie Albro. George was educated at the
Wahoo High School and might himself have become a farmer if one of his teachers at school
had not directed his mind towards science and persuaded him to go to the College of
Agriculture at Lincoln, Nebraska. In 1926 he took his B.Sc. degree at the University of
Nebraska and subsequently worked for a year with Professor F.D. Keim, who was studying
hybrid wheat. In 1927 he took his M.Sc. degree, and Professor Keim secured for him a post
as Teaching Assistant at Cornell University, where he worked, until 1931, with Professors
R.A. Emerson and L.W. Sharp on Mendelian asynopsis in Zea mays. For this work he obtained,
in 1931, his Ph.D. degree. In 1931 he was awarded a National Research Council Fellowship
at the California Institute of Technology at Pasadena, where he remained from 1931 until
1936. During this period he continued his work on Indian corn and began, in collaboration
with Professors Th. Dobzhansky, S. Emerson, and A.H. Sturtevant, work on crossing-over in
the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster.


In 1935 Beadle visited Paris for six months to work with Professor Boris Ephrussi at the
Institut de Biologie physico-chimique. Together they began the study of the development of
eye pigment in Drosophila which later led to the work on the biochemistry of the genetics
of the fungus Neurospora for which Beadle and Edward Lawrie Tatum were together awarded
the 1958 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine.
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