Godless constitution Essay

This essay has a total of 1013 words and 5 pages.


godless constitution






The Godless Constitution


When some people here the words “the godless constitution” uttered the shrill
up their noses and get very defensive. Kramnick and Moore address this idea of the United
States Constitution being godless. They speak about how America has misinterpreted views
and how society would benefit from an understanding of what the Constitution stands for
and how to correctly use it. They strive to help America understand that politics driven
by religion and faith would do the most damage to the political agenda. They also
emphasize that America created the Constitution was created to make a person’s
religious standing irrelevant to hold office or voice a political opinion. They cover
many topics addressed by the American public when trying to decide on the placement of God
in our Constitution. They are writing to help Americans gain a greater understanding of
what our forefather’s intended when writing the Constitution.

To understand why these two men are writing about The Godless Constitution, an approach on
what they believe are America’s views is needed. In the first paragraph of the
first chapter they state that they believe America argues over foolish things. They have
come to the conclusion that Americans misinterpret the intentions of the constitution in
providing a government for the people of the United States. They ask the question,
“Is America a Christian Nation?”. They do not condemn religion of any sort but
merely state that one God is not in the constitution. One main focus is on the founders
of the document. A major point made is that even though most of the founders were
Christian and lived by Christian principles, the envision was of a godless government.
Their reasoning behind this idea was not of irreverence but confidence in religion too
serve civil morality without intruding into politics. They believe in letting humans
exercise their free will to believe in a God or to reject the idea without their decision
affecting their role in government.

They refer to the one time God is mentioned in the constitution, Article 6. This merely
states that “no religious test shall ever be required as a qualification to any
office or public trust under the United States”. This one statement is used to
declare that America stands as a unity and full of diverse religions. Therefore requiring
one religion to dominate would undermine the intent of the nation of variance.

Kramnick and Moore also speak of beliefs of specific men in the history of the country.
Roger Williams’ views, thought ahead of his time, led to a better understanding of
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