Gothic Cathedrals Essay

This essay has a total of 318 words and 3 pages.

Gothic Cathedrals



tracery - In architecture, branching, ornamental stonework, generally in a window, where
it supports the glass. Tracery is particularly characteristic of Gothic architecture.
Example:

The tracery in a rose window of Washington Cathedral, Washington, DC. This graphic
displays four different photos-- they amount to a zoom into the tracery.

Also see fenestration, foil, quatrefoil, and stained glass.
rose window - Large circular windows of tracery and stained glass found in Gothic
cathedrals. Also called a wheel window. Examples:



transept - An aisle between the apse and nave. It cuts across the nave and side aisles to
form a cross-shaped floor plan. Also see architecture, cathedral, and Gothic.


nave - The major, central part of a church where the congregation gathers. It leads from
the main entrance to the altar and choir, and is usually flanked by side aisles. An
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