Humanist Essay

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Humanist


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Humanism, in philosophy, attitude that emphasizes the dignity and worth of the individual.
A basic premise of humanism is that people are rational beings who possess within
themselves the capacity for truth and goodness. The term humanism is most often used to
describe a literary and cultural movement that spread through western Europe in the 14th
and 15th centuries. This Renaissance revival of Greek and Roman studies emphasized the
value of the classics for their own sake, rather than for their relevance to Christianity.


The humanist movement started in Italy, where the late medieval Italian writers Dante,
Giovanni Boccaccio, and Francesco Petrarch contributed greatly to the discovery and
preservation of classical works.

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