Essay on I Felt A Funeral, In My Brain

This essay has a total of 404 words and 3 pages.

I Felt A Funeral, In My Brain

In my opinion, Emily Dickinson as a transcendentalist used her poetry to describe the
process of transcendental meditation, particularly the meditation of death. In this poem
she tries to allow us to expierience our true nature by entering directly into our
conscious. The poem is a deep seeking of the nature of death, the death that is a process
of expansion and transformation from solidarity to a spaciousness.


When she says: "I felt a funeral in my brain, and mourners to and fro, kept treading,
treading till it seemed that sense was breaking through... " She focuses on the sensation
of being in the body, feeling the body's substantiality and solidity, and the heaviness
caused by gravity pulling on its very substance.


When she says ..."And then I heard them lift a box and creak across my soul, With those
same boots of lead, again the space began to toll..." I believe this to be an expression
of the awareness a "Light Body" expieriences, seeing , tasting, touching, and the like.
The body that is within the heavy or outer body.


"As all the heavens were a bell, and being but an ear, and I, and silence, some strange
race, wrecked, solitary here" I believe is a reference to the phase where the "Light Body"
Continues for 2 more pages >>




  • African Art
    African Art The traditional art of Africa plays a major part in the African society. Most ceremonies and activities (such as singing, dancing, storytelling, etc.) can not function without visual art. It can also be used as an implement and insignia of rank or prestige, or have a religious significance. African art consists mainly of sculptures, paintings, fetishes, masks, figures, and decorative objects. Sculptures are considered to be the greatest achievement for African art. A majority of the
  • The Life of Mao Zedong
    The Life of Mao Zedong The Life of Mao Zedong Dressed in the drab military uniform that symbolized the revolutionary government of Communist China, Mao Zedong\'s body still looked powerful, like an giant rock in a gushing river. An enormous red flag draped his coffin, like a red sail unfurled on a Chinese junk, illustrating the dualism of traditional China and the present Communist China that typified Mao. 1 A river of people flowed past while he lay in state during the second week of September
  • Compare Diver and Gatsby
    Compare Diver and Gatsby COMPARE AND CONTRAST THE PRESENTATION OF THE CHARACTERS OF JAY GATSBY AND DICK DIVER. NOTE ESPECIALLY THEIR ATTITUDES TO LIFE, LOVE AND RELATIONSHIPS, THEIR DEMISE AND THE ROLES THEY PLAY WITHIN THEIR RESPECTIVE NOVELS. F. Scott Fitzgerald is known as a writer who chronicled his times. This work has been critically acclaimed for portraying the sentiments of the American people during the 1920s and 1930s. ‘The Great Gatsby’ was written in 1924, whilst the Fitzgeralds were
  • John Conrad
    John Conrad One of the finest sytlist of modern English literature was Joseph Conrad, was a Polish-born English novelist, short story writer, essayist, dramatist, and autobiographer. Conrad was born in 1857 in a Russian-ruled Province of Poland. According to Jocelyn Baines, a literary critic, "Conrad was exiled with his parents to northern Russia in 1863 following his his parents participation in the Polish independence movement". (Baines 34). His parents\' health rapidly deteriorated in Russia,
  • The Man who Mistook his Wife for a Hat
    The Man who Mistook his Wife for a Hat Men ought to know that from nothing else but the brain come joys, delights, laughter and sports, and sorrows, griefs despondency, and lamentations. And by this, in an especial manner, we acquire wisdom and knowledge, and see and hear and know what are foul and what are fair, what are bad and what are good, what are sweet and what are unsavory......And by the same organ we become mad and delirious, and fears and terrors assail us... All these things we endur
  • Neoplatonism
    neoplatonism The Neoplatonic Doctrine As defined by Funk and Wagnals, Neoplatonism is a type of idealistic monism in which the ultimate reality of the universe is held to be an infinite, unknowable, perfect One. From this one emanates nous (pure intelligence), whence in turn is derived the world soul, the creative activity of which engenders the lesser souls of human beings. The world soul is conceived as an image of the nous, even as the nous is an image of the One; both the nous and the world
  • SALEM WITCH TRIALS
    SALEM WITCH TRIALS The Salem witch trials began with the accusation of people in Salem of being witches. But the concept of witchcraft started far before these trials and false accusations occurred. In the early Christian centuries, the church was relatively tolerant of magical practices. Those who were proved to have engaged in witchcraft were required only to do penance. But in the late Middle Ages (13th century to 14th century) opposition to alleged witchcraft hardened as a result of the grow
  • SALEM WITCH TRIALS
    SALEM WITCH TRIALS The Salem witch trials began with the accusation of people in Salem of being witches. But the concept of witchcraft started far before these trials and false accusations occurred. In the early Christian centuries, the church was relatively tolerant of magical practices. Those who were proved to have engaged in witchcraft were required only to do penance. But in the late Middle Ages (13th century to 14th century) opposition to alleged witchcraft hardened as a result of the grow
  • SALEM WITCH TRIALS
    SALEM WITCH TRIALS The Salem witch trials began with the accusation of people in Salem of being witches. But the concept of witchcraft started far before these trials and false accusations occurred. In the early Christian centuries, the church was relatively tolerant of magical practices. Those who were proved to have engaged in witchcraft were required only to do penance. But in the late Middle Ages (13th century to 14th century) opposition to alleged witchcraft hardened as a result of the grow
  • SALEM WITCH TRIALS
    SALEM WITCH TRIALS The Salem witch trials began with the accusation of people in Salem of being witches. But the concept of witchcraft started far before these trials and false accusations occurred. In the early Christian centuries, the church was relatively tolerant of magical practices. Those who were proved to have engaged in witchcraft were required only to do penance. But in the late Middle Ages (13th century to 14th century) opposition to alleged witchcraft hardened as a result of the grow
  • Aristotile
    Aristotile Aristotle was born in 384 BC.; with him came the birth of Western realism. He was a student of Plato and a tutor to Alexander the Great (Founders, 1991). It is difficult to discuss the philosophies of Aristotle without bringing up those of his former tutor, Plato. Aristotle\'s philosophies diverted from Plato\'s, and led to Aristotle forming his own school, the Lyceum. After tutoring Alexander the Great for about five years, he founded the Lyceum in Athens, Greece (Wheelwright, 1983).
  • Art3
    art3 The Italian painter, sculptor and architect Michaelangelo was brought to Florence right after birth and grew up in the care of a stonecutter\'s wife. With 13 he became an apprentice to the Ghirlandajor and later was taken into the Medici household. In 1501, he returned to Florence from Rome and received a lot of recognition. During this time he completed "David", a monumental, classicizing, heroic nude in which the body\'s magnificent structure of bone and muscle is combined with alert, res
  • Conscuoiuseness
    Conscuoiuseness The relation of consciousness to the material world is puzzle, which has its origin in dualism, a philosophy of mind which posits their fundamental separation. Dualism, in turn, has its roots in folk wisdom. The belief that humans are more than bodies and that there is something in human nature that survives bodily death has its origins in prehistory; it becomes explicit in the mythology of Ancient Egypt and Assyria and was formulated into a philosophical position in the Platonic
  • Democracy1
    democracy1 Democracy by sheer definition is synonymous with equality. Therefore, the concept of mainstreaming fits perfectly in this scenario. Democracy comes from the Latin word demos meaning the " the people," not just one type of people, but all people. Mainstreaming children with disabilities into general classes should not be a privilege, but a common thing. Doing this in turn would instill a sense of acceptance and tolerance in the students, thereby reducing the amount of discrimination th
  • Descartes sixth meditation1
    descartes sixth meditation1 In the Sixth Meditation, Descartes makes a point that there is a distinction between mind and body. It is in Meditation Two when Descartes believes he has shown the mind to be better known than the body. In Meditation Six, however, he goes on to claim that, as he knows his mind and knows clearly and distinctly that its essence consists purely of thought. Also, that bodies\' essences consist purely of extension, and that he can conceive of his mind and body as existing
  • Spirituality and Beliefs
    Spirituality and Beliefs Spirituality and Beliefs: Implications and Impact on Mental Illness and Psychiatric Disability Introduction I wish to begin this paper by playing a short piece of music composed by Richard Einhorn and inspired by the life and writings of Joan of Arc. At the age of 13 in 1425 this shepherd girl from the village of Domremy in France began to hear voices. At sixteen these voices were telling her that she had been given a divine mission to reunite France. It is said that she
  • The Salem Witch Trails
    The Salem Witch Trails The Salem witch trials began with the accusation of people in Salem of being witches. But the concept of witchcraft started far before these trials and false accusations occurred. In the early Christian centuries, the church was relatively tolerant of magical practices. Those who were proved to have engaged in witchcraft were required only to do penance. But in the late Middle Ages (13th century to 14th century) opposition to alleged witchcraft hardened as a result of the
  • The Strange Case of Dr Jeckyll and Mr Hyde
    The Strange Case of Dr Jeckyll and Mr Hyde In the novella, “The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde”, written by Robert Louis Stevenson, demonstrates that every man or women have both good and evil within. Dr. Jekyll attempts to divide the two in his deranged experiment. Dr. Jekyll believes that if he separates the two, humankind can possibility segregate and over power the evil that exists in us all. Dr. Jekyll’s intentions are good in seeking to better society, but his technique’s are dubi
  • Welcome to hell
    welcome to hell Welcome To Hell Welcome to Hell. Please let us enslave you. We\'ll give you a free t-shirt if you fill out this credit card application... You can drive home in this brand new car, with no payments until 2000... It\'s so much easier to not worry about these details. We\'ll take care of them for you. All we ask is that you send in your payment every month like a good slave. No, no, don\'t read books. Libraries are closing more and more everyday anyway because they\'re obsolete, no
  • Beethoven5
    beethoven5 Beethoven\'s Symphony No. 9 ‘Choral\' The 9th Symphony is an amazing piece of music. From the slow opening, to its quick ascent to a powerful clash of instruments, the entire piece is captivating. The incredible part about the entire piece is that from the beginning to the end there is a contrast between soft and loud, always dueling for time. Either there is a strong controlling element running through the music or there is a soft easy melody. The dualism between the deeper instrumen
  • Taoism
    Taoism Philosophy of Mind in China Conceptual and Theoretical Matters Historical Developments: The Classical Period Historical Developments: Han Cosmology Historical Developments: The Buddhist Period Historical Developments: The Neo-Confucian Period Bibliography Introduction: Conceptual and Theoretical Matters Classical Chinese theory of mind is similar to Western "folk psychology" in that both mirror their respective background view of language. They differ in ways that fit those folk theories
  • The myth
    the myth WHAT DOES MYSTICISM HAVE TO TEACH US ABOUT CONSCIOUSNESS? Revised version of the paper delivered to "Towards a Science of Consciousness 1996 (Tucson II) April 1996 [Draft for Tucson II Conference Proceedings] Revised version appears in JCS, 5, No.2 (1998), pp. 185-201 Robert K.C. Forman, Program in Religion, Hunter College, CUNY, 695 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10021, USA. Email: RForman383@aol.com Introduction: Why Mysticism? In this article I would like to bring the findings of my somew
  • Aristotle and his basic philosophies
    aristotle and his basic philosophies Aristotle was born in 384 BC.; with him came the birth of Western realism. He was a student of Plato and a tutor to Alexander the Great (Founders, 1991). It is difficult to discuss the philosophies of Aristotle without bringing up those of his former tutor, Plato. Aristotle\'s philosophies diverted from Plato\'s, and led to Aristotle forming his own school, the Lyceum. After tutoring Alexander the Great for about five years, he founded the Lyceum in Athens, G
  • Decartes
    Decartes Descartes is famed by is familiar notion, "I think therefore I am (Cogito, ergo sum.)." It is a conclusion he has reached in his second meditation after much deliberation on the existence of anything certain. After he discovers his ability to doubt and to understand , he is able to substantiate his necessary existence as a consequence. What we doubt or understand may not ultimately correspond, but we can never be uncertain that we are in the process of thought. This idea is a major comp
  • Decartes
    Decartes Descartes is famed by is familiar notion, "I think therefore I am (Cogito, ergo sum.)." It is a conclusion he has reached in his second meditation after much deliberation on the existence of anything certain. After he discovers his ability to doubt and to understand , he is able to substantiate his necessary existence as a consequence. What we doubt or understand may not ultimately correspond, but we can never be uncertain that we are in the process of thought. This idea is a major comp
  • Divisibility Argument
    Divisibility Argument DIVISIBILITY ARGUMENT This paper will discuss the dualism’s Divisibility Argument. This argument relies on Leibniz’s Law and uses a different property to prove the distinctness of brain states of mental states. Mary, who is a materialist, presents several objections to that argument. Her main objection corresponds to the first/third-person approach. She believes that Dave presents that argument only from the first-person approach, which is introspection, and totally disrega
  • Do unsean colours exist
    do unsean colours exist Do unseen colours exist in the world and is there colour at all, the age old question? The idea of sound will be investigated in the following essay. Is there sound in the world and if a tree falls in the forest and there is no body around does it actually make a noise? These ideas will be followed by the theory of colour. Individuals “think” they see colour, so people believe there is colour in the world and do not even think twice about the issue. Still, some philosophe
  • Does a tree have colour
    does a tree have colour The idea of sound will be investigated in the following essay. Is there sound in the world and if a tree falls in the forest and there is no body around does it actually make a noise? These ideas will be followed by the theory of colour. Individuals think they see colour, so people believe there is colour in the world and do not even think twice about the issue. Still, some philosophers have presented ideas about the world with no colour. Is this theory plausible? Follo
  • Dualism
    dualism Dualism I believe that the popular or "ghost in the machine" form of substance dualism best solves the mind body problem. My views in this area have been influenced by my twelve years of Catholic education. The soul, or mind, depending on your level of belief, was a complete and separate entity and was the center of a human being. The body was an ambulatory device that the soul directed. The idea that the mind is a separate entity and that it is independent of the physical body is the ce
  • Hylomorphism
    Hylomorphism Hylomorphism in General In De Anima, Aristotle makes extensive use of technical terminology introduced and explained elsewhere in his writings. He claims, for example, using vocabulary derived from his physical and metaphysical theories, that the soul is a "first actuality of a natural organic body" (De Anima ii 1, 412b5-6), that it is a "substance as form of a natural body which has life in potentiality" (De Anima ii 1, 412a20-1) and, similarly, that it "is a first actuality of a n
  • Life After Death
    Life After Death An undeniable statement by all, philosophers or not, is that our earthly life will one day cease to exist and every living individual will one day meet their death. A simple definition of death would be the complete annihilation of one self, where the life or awakeness one would feel in their brief life would be no more. Basically, the opposite to life. However, even the definition of death may be open to argument by many. Some may believe that death is not the end of life or no
  • METHOD OF DOUBT
    METHOD OF DOUBT Descartes applied illusion argument, dreaming argument, and evil genius argument that is called "method of doubt" to achieve his goals: Mind and body are two different substances, the complete separation of the mental world and the physical world. Once, he claims that even awake or asleep, two plus three is always five. Even evil genius fakes us, we probably think two plus three is four but in fact it always exist as five and it is always true. Lets look at this example: If I thi
  • Rene Decartes
    Rene Decartes Descartes is famed by is familiar notion, "I think therefore I am (Cogito, ergo sum.)." It is a conclusion he has reached in his second meditation after much deliberation on the existence of anything certain. After he discovers his ability to doubt and to understand , he is able to substantiate his necessary existence as a consequence. What we doubt or understand may not ultimately correspond, but we can never be uncertain that we are in the process of thought. This idea is a major
  • St Augustine on Death
    St Augustine on Death Saint Augustine on Death Death is a very natural occurrence in life, and everyone experiences death differently, but yet in the same way. When Augustine was a young boy his father died, and he makes a small account of this in the Confessions. Later on in life, he loses a dear friend, and his loving mother. With time, he mentally matures and death affects Augustine differently each time. The death of his father was merely mentioned in the Confessions, while the death of Moni
  • Tree and colour
    tree and colour The idea of sound will be investigated in the following essay. Is there sound in the world and if a tree falls in the forest and there is no body around does it actually make a noise? These ideas will be followed by the theory of colour. Individuals “think” they see colour, so people believe there is colour in the world and do not even think twice about the issue. Still, some philosophers have presented ideas about the world with no colour. Is this theory plausible? Following the
  • Adrienne Rich
    Adrienne Rich "What I know, I know through making poems" Passion, Politics and the Body in the Poetry of Adrienne Rich Liz Yorke, Nottingham Trent University, England This paper is largely extracted from my book Adrienne Rich, which is to be published by Sage in October this year...What I have tried to do for the paper is to track one thread explored by the book, which I feel runs through the whole span of Rich\'s thought, a thread which links desire, passion, and the body - to politics, to acti
  • Self andsociety
    self andsociety "self and society are two sides of the same coin" - To what extent is this true? "The self is the individual as known to the individual" (Murphy 1947). The self as defined by Murphy above shows a definition of the self described as in internal occurrence but this idea is then subject to outside contributions - family, friends, colleagues - society in which you live. The definitions of self all seem to highlight a reflective process to achieve its identification (looking inwardly
  • Christology
    Christology Christology In relation to the humanity, he is one and the same Christ, the son, the Lord, the Only Begotten, who is to be acknowledged in two natures, without confusion, without change, without division and without separation. - Creed of Chalcedon (A.D. 451) For thousands of years the true nature of Jesus Christ has been widely debated. Christology is the theology devoted to studying the human and divine natures and roles of Jesus Christ. Many interpretations and viewpoints have b
  • Christology1
    Christology1 Christology In relation to the humanity, he is one and the same Christ, the son, the Lord, the Only Begotten, who is to be acknowledged in two natures, without confusion, without change, without division and without separation. - Creed of Chalcedon (A.D. 451) For thousands of years the true nature of Jesus Christ has been widely debated. Christology is the theology devoted to studying the human and divine natures and roles of Jesus Christ. Many interpretations and viewpoints have
  • Manichism
    Manichism The Manichaean character of economics. Charles Kindleberger. Abstract: Economics is said to have adopted a certain degree of dualism. None of its tenets have been absolute in terms of social effectivity. To survive in an economic system, rules must be enforced to ensure the peace. There are times when pluralism is good for a society as a way recognizing social differences. However, there are times, such as war, when the rule of a central authority is preferred. Laws in economics are ha
  • Mere christanity
    mere christanity C.S. Lewis begins his book, “Mere Christianity”, by introducing the Law of Right and Wrong or the Laws of Nature. This, however, arises a question. What is the Law of Nature? The Law of Nature is the known difference between right and wrong. That is, mans distinction between what is right and what is wrong. “This law was called the Law of Nature because people thought that everyone knew it and did not need to be taught it”(18). Lewis relates the law to how we treat others. We tr
  • Religion or Science
    Religion or Science This paper will examine the scientific view verse religion. I feel support for the big picture is shallow and untenable. I believe in science but I also have faith. Scientific research has lead to dramatic and more humane treatments of persons suffering from mental disease, depression, and physical injury. The reputation of scientists has reached an all-time high. Majorities of Americans have said they trust the scientific community more than almost anyone, including the Supr
  • Mind and machine
    mind and machine Mind and Machine: The Essay Technology has traditionally evolved as the result of human needs. Invention, when prized and rewarded, will invariably rise-up to meet the free market demands of society. It is in this realm that Artificial Intelligence research and the resultant expert systems have been forged. Much of the material that relates to the field of Artificial Intelligence deals with human psychology and the nature of consciousness. Exhaustive debate on consciousness and
  • Aesthetics
    Aesthetics A Brief History of Aesthetics Aesthetics is the theoretical study of the arts and related types of behavior and experience. It is traditionally regarded as a branch of philosophy, concerned with the understanding of beauty and its manifestations in art and nature. However, in the latter 20th century there developed a tendency to treat it as an independent science, concerned with investigating the phenomena of art and its place in human life. Yet, what in a field with a hazy line in b
  • Descartes and the Existence of God
    Descartes and the Existence of God Once Descartes has realized that he can know with certainty that I exist is true, he continues to build on his foundation of truths. The truth about the nature of God, proof of Gods existence, and the nature of corporeal objects are considered, among others, after Descartes proves his existence. Descartes principal task in the Meditations was to devise a system that would bring him to the truth. He wanted to build a foundation from which all further philos
  • From the Dream to the Womb
    From the Dream to the Womb From the Dream to the Womb: Visionary Impulse and Political Ambivalence in The Great Gatsby It seems hard to believe in our period, when a three-decade lurch to the political Right has anathematized the word, but F. Scott Fitzgerald once, rather fashionably, believed himself to be a socialist. Some years before, he had also, less fashionably, tried hard to think himself a Catholic. While one hardly associates the characteristic setting of Fitzgerald\'s novels, his cho
  • The Holy City Inside
    The Holy City Inside Of the true masterpieces in the English language, one of the most metaphysically challenging and eternally relevant is William Blakes Jerusalem. It took Blake four thousand lines etched onto one hundred plates to put his reinterpretation of the prophetic books of the Bible into an English context. The poem shows not only Blakes new understanding of the Old Testament gained from his recent learning of the Hebrew language, but his freedom from the Miltonic tradition. In the
  • William Faulkner
    William Faulkner William Faulkner: His Life and Achievements William Faulkner is viewed by many as Americas greatest writer of prose fiction. He was born in New Albany, Mississippi where he lived a life filled with good times and bad times. However, despite bad times he would become known as a poet, a short story writer, and finally one of the greatest contemporary novelist of his time. William Faulkners accomplishments resulted not only from his love and devotion of writing, but also from fa
  • World context centred approach to the rime
    world context centred approach to the rime Part 1 (c) The Rime of the Ancyent Marinere, as a product of its culturally inscribed author, presents a confused Unitarian world view consistent with that of the Romantic Movement of its time. It attempts to exemplify this view within an unpredictable and often mysterious universe, and by rebuking the hegemonic ideologies held by the texts cultural antagonists, seeks to grant the awareness of an often unreasonable world populated by its readers pass
  • CompareContrast the Unification of Germany Italy a
    CompareContrast the Unification of Germany Italy and the United States From the 1790s to 1814 French troops successively conquered and occupied the area that later constituted the German Empire. French domination helped to modernize and consolidate Germany and -- toward the end -- sparked the first upsurge of German nationalism. In different ways the French emperor Napoleon I helped German unification. It was important that he encouraged many of the middle-sized German states to absorb huge num