Ida B. Wells Paper

This essay has a total of 691 words and 9 pages.

Ida B. Wells


The Success of Ida B. Wells


"One had better die fighting against injustice than die like

a dog or a rat in a trap."



- Ida B. Wells


Ida B. Wells was an important figure in Black American

History. She was born a slave in Mississippi in 1862.

Wells was able to gain an education and, later, became a

journalist for various Negro papers. Through her writing,

she was able to attack issues dealing with discrimination

against African-American people. Ida B. Wells became an

international activist for African-American rights when she

informed the English people about lynching in America. She

became a well-known lecturer, activist, and organizer in

American and in England. Wells established the Negro

Fellowship League, the Ida B. Wells Women's Club, the

National Association of Colored Women and was extremely

involved in other organizations for African-American

advancement.

There were a few advantageous elements that helped

Wells' success in her activist efforts. One being that

gender relations, of that time, were honorable within the

African-American community. Another advantage for Ida B.


2

Wells was her biological sex. Ida B. Wells fought hard in

her effort to secure America as a safe environment for

Blacks, but she managed to accomplish a remarkable amount of

her efforts due to various gender and sex related assets

which were in her favor.

One advantage Ida B. Wells was fortunate to claim was

that gender relations in the Black community were very

favorable. Due to the strenuous labor male and female

African-Americans had to endure during slavery, neither sex

proclaimed its opposite inferior and, therefore, Ida B.

Wells was able to make huge leaps within the

African-American community. For instance, Wells was able to

become an outstanding journalist, become editor and co-owner

of a Black newspaper, and Black men did not object to her

leadership in these occupations. Black men respected and

honored her work in the advancement of African-Americans,

instead of envying a woman for accomplishing these essential

tasks before a male exhibited her achievements. Black men,
Continues for 5 more pages >>




  • Alice Walker review
    Alice Walker review Courtney Smith Final Paper 5/11/2000 Alice Walker, in a short story called Advancing Luna- and Ida B. Wells, reflects back on her life to a friendship she had with a white girl in the sixties. She does so in a approach to which she justifies herself and her actions with still a sense of uncertainty. Through her language and descriptions it is clear that Walker is still struggling with the structure to which this friendship relied. She tells of her relationship with Luna in a
  • Southern Horrors and Other Writings
    Southern Horrors and Other Writings What is mob violence? Well, nowadays, mob violence differs in comparison to mob violence in the nineteenth century. In the years following the Civil War, there was a lot of mistreatment of African Americans. Ida B. Wells, a young African American journalist, investigated and accounted for the violence acted upon the African Americans during the Post-Reconstruction period. Wells wrote about her investigations because she belied it was the "first step to tell th
  • Ida B Wells Barnett
    Ida B Wells Barnett IDA B. WELLS-BARNETT Ida B. Wells-Barnett is first among many. She was a civil servant and fought injustices amongst the black community. Ida was born a slave in Holly Springs, Mississippi in 1862. There she witnessed the Civil War and the dramatic changes it brought to her life. During Reconstruction she found possession of previously unheard-of freedoms, her civil rights. The most dramatic change was the institution of schools for the education of blacks. The establishment
  • Influential women
    Influential women Running Head: INFLUENTIAL WOMEN Influential Women Delmy E Gooch Sociology and Philosophy of Gender Summer Evening Introduction There have been many women that have changed and shaped the role of women today. They opened the doors of opportunity for future women and made many contributions to our society. Some of these accomplishments have gone unnoticed. The reason that I chose to discuss the influential women of the past and present was because they are the ones that have give
  • Living the Legacy The womens rights movement
    Living the Legacy The womens rights movement Living the Legacy: The Women\'s Rights Movement 1848 - 1998. "Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it\'s the only thing that ever has." That was Margaret Mead\'s conclusion after a lifetime of observing very diverse cultures around the world. Her insight has been borne out time and again throughout the development of this country of ours. Being allowed to live life in an atmosphere of religious
  • Rosa Park
    Rosa Park One Person\'s Belief: The Story of Rosa Parks and the Civil Rights Movement "My feets is weary, but my soul is rested." This quote summarizes how Rosa Parks felt after her victory for the advancement of African Americans in society. Rosa Parks\' simple act of protest galvanized America\'s civil rights revolution. Mrs. Parks is best known for her refusal to give up her seat on a bus to a white man in Montgomery, Alabama. The civil rights movement originates back to the Reconstruction Er
  • Womens Rights
    Womens Rights Women and the Fight for Reform Women in the late 19th century, except in the few western states where they could vote, were denied much of a role in the governing process. Nonetheless, educated the middle-class women saw themselves as a morally uplifting force and went on to be reformers. Jane Addams opened the social settlement of Hull House in 1889. It offered an array of services to help the poor deal with slum housing, disease, crowding, jobless, infant mortality, and environme
  • Womens Rights
    Womens Rights Women and the Fight for Reform Women in the late 19th century, except in the few western states where they could vote, were denied much of a role in the governing process. Nonetheless, educated the middle-class women saw themselves as a morally uplifting force and went on to be reformers. Jane Addams opened the social settlement of Hull House in 1889. It offered an array of services to help the poor deal with slum housing, disease, crowding, jobless, infant mortality, and environme
  • Womens fight for freedom
    Womens fight for freedom Women and the Fight for Reform Women in the late 19th century, except in the few western states where they could vote, were denied much of a role in the governing process. Nonetheless, educated the middle-class women saw themselves as a morally uplifting force and went on to be reformers. Jane Addams opened the social settlement of Hull House in 1889. It offered an array of services to help the poor deal with slum housing, disease, crowding, jobless, infant mortality, a
  • Ida b wells
    ida b wells IDA B. WELLS-BARNETT Ida B. Wells-Barnett is first among many. She was a civil servant and fought injustices amongst the black community. Ida was born a slave in Holly Springs, Mississippi in 1862. There she witnessed the Civil War and the dramatic changes it brought to her life. During Reconstruction she found possession of previously unheard-of freedoms, her civil rights. The most dramatic change was the institution of schools for the education of blacks. The establishment of the
  • Unconditional Love
    Unconditional Love Love is extremely precious. With all the commitments and contracts and vows made, love continues to be precious. Asha Bandele, the author of and as The Prisoners Wife: A Memoir, realizes that no matter if she is suspended from school or divorces her husband or disappoints her parents, love will conquer and triumph over hardships and mistakes. Asha was not a deprived child growing up in New York. She was able to attend respectable schools, live in a nuclear home, and have exp
  • Booker T Washington
    Booker T Washington At a time when the Black community is being afforded a free status, but not one of equality, many leaders arise out of the woodwork to appeal to the white governing body for social equality. The transition from the ninetieth century to the twentieth century gives birth to two of these leaders, Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. Du Bois. These two men are both working to achieve a common goal, but the roads on which they’re each traveling to get there differ significantly. Booke
  • The reconstruction
    the reconstruction The Reconstruction-Era: A High Price for Freedom The Reconstruction-era offered numerous opportunities to African-Americans, by attempting to secure the rights for ex-slaves, but the opportunities presented even more obstacles to them. The thought of freedom intrigued the African-Americans at first, but many of them quickly changed their minds after experiencing it. Henry William Ravenel, a slaveowner, proclaimed, When they were told they were free, some said they did not wi
  • The reconstruction
    the reconstruction The Reconstruction-Era: A High Price for Freedom The Reconstruction-era offered numerous opportunities to African-Americans, by attempting to secure the rights for ex-slaves, but the opportunities presented even more obstacles to them. The thought of freedom intrigued the African-Americans at first, but many of them quickly changed their minds after experiencing it. Henry William Ravenel, a slaveowner, proclaimed, When they were told they were free, some said they did not wi
  • Womens rights
    womens rights Beginning in the mid-19th century, several generations of woman suffragesupporters lectured, wrote, marched and disobeyed many rules to change in the Constitution. parades, silence and hunger strikes where used to demonstrate the need for a change in the constitution. Women struggled for their rights ,and they struggled equally to black americans who desired voting rights as well(The Fifteenth Amendment., Susan Banfield pp.11-20). Women had it difficult in the mid-1800s to early 1
  • Constant Star A theater Review
    Constant Star A theater Review "Constant Star" by Tazewell Thompson is a play which sticks out in my mind as being one of the best I have ever had the priviledge of watching. The play is centered around the life of Ida B. Wells, a black woman who stands up for equality at all costs. Although the content of the play is moving and very interesting, the lighting, songs, costumes, props, and special effects are what made the play so extraordinary. In "Constant Star", lighting told much about the pl
  • Mary Terrell
    Mary Terrell Mary Church Terrell (1865-1954) One of the leading black female activists of the 20th century, during her life, Mary Church Terrell worked as a writer, lecturer and educator. She is remembered best for her contribution to the struggle for the rights of women of African descent. Mary Terrell was born in Memphis, Tennessee at the close of the Civil War. Her parents, former slaves who later became millionaires, tried to shelter her from the harsh reality of racism. However, as her awa
  • Ida B Wells
    Ida B Wells January 28, 1999 Prof. Warren Metcalf History 1493 Ida B. Wells Ida B. Wells was dedicated to journalism and letting people know what is going on. With her journalism investigation instincts, she uses to identify what excuses the whites use to identify lynch campaign against blacks. In the following essay, I will explain what reasons for this vicious and sustained campaign of violence against African-Americans. Ida B. Wells felt that the white should be considered as rapist more tha
  • Women in the late 19th century
    Women in the late 19th century Women in the late 19th century, except in the few western states where they could vote, were denied much of a role in the governing process. Nonetheless, educated the middle-class women saw themselves as a morally uplifting force and went on to be reformers. Jane Addams opened the social settlement of Hull House in 1889. It offered an array of services to help the poor deal with slum housing, disease, crowding, jobless, infant mortality, and environmental hazards.
  • Ida B. Wells
    Ida B. Wells IDA B. WELLS-BARNETT Ida B. Wells-Barnett is first among many. She was a civil servant and fought injustices amongst the black community. Ida was born a slave in Holly Springs, Mississippi in 1862. There she witnessed the Civil War and the dramatic changes it brought to her life. During Reconstruction she found possession of previously unheard-of freedoms, her civil rights. The most dramatic change was the institution of schools for the education of blacks. The establishment of the
  • Ida B. Wells
    Ida B. Wells The Success of Ida B. Wells quot;One had better die fighting against injustice than die like a dog or a rat in a trap. quot; #9; - Ida B. Wells #9;Ida B. Wells was an important figure in Black American History. She was born a slave in Mississippi in 1862. Wells was able to gain an education and, later, became a journalist for various Negro papers. Through her writing, she was able to attack issues dealing with discrimination against African-American people. Ida B. Wells became an in
  • Harlem Renaissance
    Harlem Renaissance Harlem Renaissance The Harlem Renaissance was a time of racism, injustice, and importance. Somewhere in between the 1920s and 1930s an African American movement occurred in Harlem, New York City. The Harlem Renaissance exalted the unique culture of African-Americans and redefined African-American expression. It was the result of Blacks migrating in the North, mostly Chicago and New York. There were many significant figures, both male and female, that had taken part in the Harl
  • Ida B. Wells
    Ida B. Wells Ida B. Wells Ida B. Wells (1862-1931) was a newspaper editor and journalist who went on to lead the American anti-lynching crusade. Working closely with both African-American community leaders and American suffragists, Wells worked to raise gender issues within the Race Question and race issues within the Woman Question. Wells was born the daughter of slaves in Holly Springs, Mississippi, on July 16, 1862. During Reconstruction, she was educated at a Missouri Freedman\'s School, Rus
  • Womens Rights 1848-1920
    Womens Rights 1848-1920 Women had it difficult in the mid-1800s to early 1900s. There was a difference in the treatment of men and women. For example: Married women were legally dead in the eyes of the lawWomen were not allowed to voteWomen had to submit to laws when they had no voice in their formationMarried women had no property rightsWomen were not allowed to enter professions such as medicine or lawWomen had no means to gain an education since no college or university would accept women stu
  • Womens Rights
    Womens Rights Women had it difficult in the mid-1800s to early 1900s. There was a difference in the treatment of men and women then. Married women were legally dead in the eyes of the law. Women were not even allowed to vote until August 1920. They were not allowed to enter professions such as medicine or law. There were no chances of women getting an education then because no college or university would accept a female with only a few exceptions. Women were not allowed to participate in the aff
  • Ida B. Wells
    Ida B. Wells IDA B. WELLS-BARNETT Ida B. Wells-Barnett is first among many. She was a civil servant and fought injustices amongst the black community. Ida was born a slave in Holly Springs, Mississippi in 1862. There she witnessed the Civil War and the dramatic changes it brought to her life. During Reconstruction she found possession of previously unheard-of freedoms, her civil rights. The most dramatic change was the institution of schools for the education of blacks. The establishment of the
  • National Association For The Advancement Of Colore
    National Association For The Advancement Of Colored People National Association for the Advancement of Colored People Born from the Niagara Movement, led by William E. B. DuBois, the NAACP has had a volatile birth and a lively history (Beifuss 17:E4). The impetus for the creation of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People came in the summer of 1908. Severe race riots in Springfield, Illinois, prompted William English Walling to write articles questioning the treatment of t
  • Booker T. Washington
    Booker T. Washington Booker T. Washington was the first African American whose likeness appeared on a United States postage stamp. Washington also was thus honored a quarter century after his death. In 1946 he also became the first black with his image on a coin, a 50-cent piece. The Tuskegee Institute, which Washington started at the age of 25, was the where the 10-cent stamps first were available. The educator\'s monument on its campus shows him lifting a symbolic veil from the head of a freed
  • Matthew B. Brady
    Matthew B. Brady Mathew B. Brady: Civil War Photographer Mathew B. Brady: Civil War Photographer was written by Elizabeth Van Steenwyk. Elizabeth Van Steenwyk has written many good books for young people including: Saddlebag Salesmen, The California Missions, Frederic Remington, The California Gold Rush: West with the Forty-Niners, and Ida B. Wells-Barnett: Woman of Courage. Elizabeth now lives in San Marino, California with her husband. Mathew B. Brady was born somewhere between 1823 and 1824.
  • Rockefellers
    Rockefellers Jessica M. Hintermeister American History Louisa Garry Due: Thursday, March 15, 2001 The Rockefellers feared the temptations of wealth, yet a visitor once described their estate as the kind of place God would have built if only he\'d had the money. They amassed a fortune that outraged a Democratic nation, then gave it all away reshaping America. They were the closest thing the country had to a royal family, but the Rockefellers shunned the public eye. For decades, the Rockefeller na
  • Womens Rights
    Womens Rights Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it\'s the only thing that ever has. That was Margaret Mead\'s conclusion after a lifetime of observing very diverse cultures around the world. Her insight has been borne out time and again throughout the development of this country of ours. Being allowed to live life in an atmosphere of religious freedom, having a voice in the government you support with your taxes, living free of lifelon
  • The Movement Of Womens Rights
    The Movement Of Womens Rights Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it\'s the only thing that ever has. That was Margaret Mead\'s conclusion after a lifetime of observing very diverse cultures around the world. Her insight has been borne out time and again throughout the development of this country of ours. Being allowed to live life in an atmosphere of religious freedom, having a voice in the government you support with your taxes, living
  • Black Leaders Of 20th Century
    Black Leaders Of 20th Century BLACK LEADERS OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY In the time after the fall of radical black reconstruction of the nineteenth century, African Americans were being oppressed by rural farming, civil rights, economical advancement and sharecropping. Booker T. Washington charged the fight for economical and political accommodation with his dream of equal civil rights. Timothy Thomas Fortune was an influential black journalist that fought for the rights of African Americans throu
  • Living The Legacy: The Womens Rights Movement 1848
    Living The Legacy: The Womens Rights Movement 1848-1998 Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it\'s the only thing that ever has. That was Margaret Mead\'s conclusion after a lifetime of observing very diverse cultures around the world. Her insight has been borne out time and again throughout the development of this country of ours. Being allowed to live life in an atmosphere of religious freedom, having a voice in the government you suppo
  • Civil Rights
    Civil Rights In the United States, the protest has always been an important tool of democracy, a way for the minority to let itself be heard. Take the Civil Rights movement. Today\'s race relations are better than they were fifty years ago because a relatively small group of people convinced enough of the country that racism was a disease that would kill everything that made America special. These people were following in the footsteps of an earlier generation. Long before Martin Luther King Jr.
  • Ida Wells Barnett
    Ida Wells Barnett Ida Wells Barnett Ida Wells-Barnett was born in Holly Springs, Mississippi in 1862. She was the oldest of eight children. Ida was born of slaves, but her parents were able to support eight children. Her mother was a famous cook, and her father was a skilled carpenter. When Ida was only fourteen, an epidemic of Yellow Fever swept though Holly Spring and killed her parents and youngest sibling. She kept her family together by securing a job teaching. Ida managed to continue her e
  • Black Leaders Of 20th Century
    Black Leaders Of 20th Century BLACK LEADERS OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY CHAPTER 1-3 In the time after the fall of radical black reconstruction of the nineteenth century, African Americans were being oppressed by rural farming, civil rights, economical advancement and sharecropping. Booker T. Washington charged the fight for economical and political accommodation with his dream of equal civil rights. Timothy Thomas Fortune was an influential black journalist that fought for the rights of African Ame
  • Booker T. Washington
    Booker T. Washington Booker T. Washington was the first African American whose likeness appeared on a United States postage stamp. Washington also was thus honored a quarter century after his death. In 1946 he also became the first black with his image on a coin, a 50-cent piece. The Tuskegee Institute, which Washington started at the age of 25, was the where the 10-cent stamps first were available. The educator\'s monument on its campus shows him lifting a symbolic veil from the head of a freed
  • Booker T. Washington
    Booker T. Washington Booker T. Washington Booker T. Washington was the first African American whose likeness appeared on a United States postage stamp. Washington also was thus honored a quarter century after his death. In 1946 he also became the first black with his image on a coin, a 50-cent piece. The Tuskegee Institute, which Washington started at the age of 25, was the where the 10-cent stamps first were available. The educator\'s monument on its campus shows him lifting a symbolic veil fro
  • Ida B. Wells
    Ida B. Wells Ida B. Wells was a woman dedicated to a cause, a cause to prevent hundreds of thousands of people from being murdered by lynching. Lynching is defined as to take the law into its own hands and kill someone in punishment for a crime or a presumed crime. Ida B. Wells\' back round made her a logical spokesperson against lynching. She drew on many experiences throughout her life to aid in her crusade. Her position as a black woman, however, affected her credibility both in and out of Am
  • John D. Rockefeller
    John D. Rockefeller Jessica M. Hintermeister American History Louisa Garry Due: Thursday, March 15, 2001 The Rockefellers feared the temptations of wealth, yet a visitor once described their estate as the kind of place God would have built if only he\'d had the money. They amassed a fortune that outraged a Democratic nation, then gave it all away reshaping America. They were the closest thing the country had to a royal family, but the Rockefellers shunned the public eye. For decades, the Rockefe
  • Feminist Theory
    Feminist Theory Introduction Since the beginning of time women have been considered inferior to men, which seem to proceed to affect everyday lives of all social beings in this world. Women have a disease, a disease that will prevent them for ever having the political drive to achieve political, social or economic opportunities men have. This disease is the need for independency and self-respect or the lack there of. This is what we have come to know as feminism. Feminism refers to the body of t
  • Womens Reform Movement
    Womens Reform Movement Women and the Fight for Reform Women in the late 19th century, except in the few western states where they could vote, were denied much of a role in the governing process. Nonetheless, educated the middle-class women saw themselves as a morally uplifting force and went on to be reformers. Jane Addams opened the social settlement of Hull House in 1889. It offered an array of services to help the poor deal with slum housing, disease, crowding, jobless, infant mortality, and
  • Ida B. Wells 2
    Ida B. Wells 2 The Success of Ida B. Wells \'One had better die fighting against injustice than die like a dog or a rat in a trap.\'; - Ida B. Wells Ida B. Wells was an important figure in Black American History. She was born a slave in Mississippi in 1862. Wells was able to gain an education and, later, became a journalist for various Negro papers. Through her writing, she was able to attack issues dealing with discrimination against African-American people. Ida B. Wells became an international
  • Chicago
    Chicago Chicago has been the fastest growing city of the world. "The city of the Century" is the name given to this historic city. It is a great city of the greatest people who devoted almost their whole life to this city. Jane Addams, Florence Kelley, Clarence Darrow, Mary McDowell, Thorstein Veblen, Albert Parsons, Ida B. Wells, George Pullman, Louis Sullivan and Danker Adler are few of the people among them. No large city even Peter the Great\'s St. Petersburg had ever grown as fast as Chicag
  • Women's Rights
    Women\'s Rights Women had it difficult in the mid-1800s to early 1900s. There was a difference in the treatment of men and women then. Married women were legally dead in the eyes of the law. Women were not even allowed to vote until August 1920. They were not allowed to enter professions such as medicine or law. There were no chances of women getting an education then because no college or university would accept a female with only a few exceptions. Women were not allowed to participate in the a
  • The Movement of Womens Rights
    The Movement of Womens Rights "Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it\'s the only thing that ever has." That was Margaret Mead\'s conclusion after a lifetime of observing very diverse cultures around the world. Her insight has been borne out time and again throughout the development of this country of ours. Being allowed to live life in an atmosphere of religious freedom, having a voice in the government you support with your taxes, livi
  • Booker T. Washington
    Booker T. Washington Booker T. Washington Booker T. Washington was the first African American whose likeness appeared on a United States postage stamp. Washington also was thus honored a quarter century after his death. In 1946 he also became the first black with his image on a coin, a 50-cent piece. The Tuskegee Institute, which Washington started at the age of 25, was the where the 10-cent stamps first were available. Booker Taliaferro Washington was born a slave on April 5, 1856, in Franklin
  • Living the Legacy: The Women's Rights Movement 184
    Living the Legacy: The Women\'s Rights Movement 1848-1998 "Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it\'s the only thing that ever has." That was Margaret Mead\'s conclusion after a lifetime of observing very diverse cultures around the world. Her insight has been borne out time and again throughout the development of this country of ours. Being allowed to live life in an atmosphere of religious freedom, having a voice in the government you s
  • Women's Rights 1848-1920
    Women\'s Rights 1848-1920 Women had it difficult in the mid-1800s to early 1900s. There was a difference in the treatment of men and women. For example: Married women were legally dead in the eyes of the law Women were not allowed to vote Women had to submit to laws when they had no voice in their formation Married women had no property rights Women were not allowed to enter professions such as medicine or law Women had no means to gain an education since no college or university would accept wo