Jazz Showcase Essay

This essay has a total of 1022 words and 5 pages.

Jazz Showcase

Jazz Showcase

The concert I attended was the Jazz Showcase in Rudder Theatre on Monday June21, 2004 at 7:30 p.m.

Surroundings
Rudder Theatre is a large venue for this Jazz Showcase. There are five sections with
fifteen rows deep in each section. The theatre is decorated modestly with solid colors and
nothing too spectacular or eye catching. The chairs were covered in a yellowish fabric.
The initial backdrop behind the stage was a white backdrop with red and blue lighting.
This backdrop would change colors throughout the concert. Located at the doors were ushers
with programs detailing the Texas Music Festival. The seats inside were not assigned but
on a first come first serve basis. Seated in the very front and centered to the audience
were the performers. The stage was set up with five chairs lined up three rows back. Each
row was more elevated than the previous. The piano was at the far left, the guitar and
bass were next to the piano, and the drums were in the back. The first row of chairs
included the saxophone players, the second row were the trombone players, and the trumpet
players were in the third and last row.

Audience
The audience, for the most part, seemed to be made up of college students attending for
the same reasons as myself. However, there were some audience members who are part of
older age groups in the audience. They were there only seeking a good performance and a
great time. These older age group audience members were located mostly in the center
section of the theatre seated in the first few rows. The dress was more casual among the
students but dressier for the older people. Some people were in jeans and a T-shirt,
including myself, while some wore nice clothes. The audience rewarded each soloist with a
warm ovation of applause after their turn was finished. This led me to believe the
audience enjoyed the performance and was very respectable to the performers.

Performers
I counted nineteen total performers with occasionally two others and a vocalist. Each
performer was dressed in black pants and a black shirt except one who showed up late. He
was wearing blue jeans and a sports coat and he definitely stood out from all the others.
The performers related very well with the audience. Each acknowledged the audience after
applauses and there was a narrator between pieces. There was a lot of humor among the
performers and they seemed to enjoy playing with each other. You could tell they had
played together many times before this concert. In relation to their instruments, the
performers played them very eloquently, especially during the solos.

The Music
Way Out Basie: This was the opening piece the performers immediately began playing on
they came on stage. It was a very nice piece and a great selection to start the
concert.
Continues for 3 more pages >>




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