Paper on John Smith and William Bradford

This essay has a total of 654 words and 3 pages.

John Smith and William Bradford

The author John Smith, a pilgrim who arrived to the Americas, wrote a description of the
new land in his book " A Description of New England ". In this book Smith shows a
wonderful world of vast food and pleasure. Also, William Bradford another pilgrim who
arrived to Plymouth on the coast of Massachusetts, wrote a book called " Of Plymouth
Plantation " in which he describes what really happened their, how the pilgrims actually
lived. The purpose of this essay is to compare and contrast both authors and their books.
John Smith wrote about the wonderful place the New World was, on the other hand, William
Bradford wrote about the realities and difficulties of the New World.


In " A Description of New England ", Smith starts by describing the pleasure and content
that risking your life for getting your own piece of land brings to men. On the other
hand, Bradford reminds us how harsh and difficult the trip to the New World was for the
pilgrims. Smith also implies that building your own house, planting your own crops, and
having a " God's blessing industry " would be easy to have without having any prejudice.
Bradford, instead, writes about the condition of the men who arrived to the shore. He also
mentions that, in the New World there was no one to welcome them, more over there was no
place to stay in, no houses, no inns. Smith argues about the pleasure of erecting towns
and populating them.


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