Joseph Stalin vs. Maximilien Robespierre Essay

This essay has a total of 534 words and 3 pages.

Joseph Stalin vs. Maximilien Robespierre

Robespierre is known as possibly the greatest leader of the French Revolution. Stalin is
known as one of Russia's greatest leaders. There are many differences and similarities in
each of their reigns as leaders. Both used economic plans and total war effort as a
campaign to further there revolution. Stalin and Robespierre used their revolutions,
however, through terror Stalin remained true to his revolution but Robespierre betrayed
his.

Stalin had an ingenious plan to help his country's economy get back on track. He called
this plan the Five Year Plan which consisted of four parts. First was a plan to increase
industrial output in five years because Russia was far behind the Great Powers of Europe.
Second was the end of NEP, New Economic Plan, in Russia. NEP was another way of saying
collectivization. Third was more focused to the increase of steel production, which they
were able to do by five hundred percent. And lastly was his commitment of investing
one-third of the government's income to industry.

Robespierre had a similar economic takeover tied in with his total war effort.
Robespierre's "total war" effort helped both to better the economy and unite France. His
effort included a draft of all able bodied, single men, fixed prices on goods, and the
"bread of equality"; bread that was made from regular wheat and not the wheat used in
pastries which were often viewed as "rich people" food. The total war effort also included
the alliance of all the businesses and people to help and support the army by providing
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