Kapital Essay

This essay has a total of 1090 words and 5 pages.

Kapital



American Gov.

Kapital


When one gets down to the roots of capitalism you find that it is a form of government
that allows the rich to get richer, the poor, poorer and the middle class to stay the
same. Karl Marx wrote a book, Kapital about the what capitalism does to the people in a
society, how it takes the humainty out of being and replaces it with x. Not only does it
do that but it creates a chain of commodities, fetishisis, and alienation within a
society.

Commodities are at the top of this chain. A commodity is anything that is produced for
exchange. They have two parts to them, the use of the commodity and its value. With women,
and men the use of the human body is humanity, doing whatever it is that pleases you,
whether it be riding your bike, reading, dancing, whatever, it comes down to your
humanity. Their humanity is turned into a value when women have to sell their use to
obtain different forms of commodities, to then exchange those commodities for more
commodities. In capitalism women are defined by their bodies, and judged by what their
bodies can do, and look like. Women have to sell their humanity because in capitalism
that’s the only thing people have to sell. In capitalism it doesn’t matter who or what you
are, as long as you’re producing something that will make money. Women sell their humanity
in different ways, there seems to be a same scale in place with women’s jobs, modeling
(which is at the far right), stripping (somewhere in between), and prostitution (which is
at the far left). Most wouldn’t connect these three with having any basic ground (maybe
stripping & prostitution), but their basic ground is that women are all selling there use
for some form of a commodity, which most of the time is money.

The outcome that that has is profound. Not only does it effect women, and girls, it
effects boys and men. Their images of women become so distorted that they begin to believe
them. Women become fetishes for both men and women. With any commodity it will become a
fetish. “Society divides its labor between a multitude of private producers who relate to
each other by exchanging their products,” (Marx’s Kapital For Beginners, page 60) when
that happens it gives the use value this imaginary power, which is an fetish. Fetisizing
women limits what a woman is, could be, or wants to be, because the fetish with women is
sex.

A large part of society that puts that and more standards on women are men. Men fetishsize
women as sex objects, by supporting prostitution, and strippers, and putting standards on
what is beautiful (models). Women become nothing more than sex, and bodies. For men and
woman. Not only do they view themselves as sex objects (models, strippers, etc.), but as
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