Lamb Essay

This essay has a total of 733 words and 3 pages.

lamb

The lamb is a symbol of innocence, ignorance, purity, and self justification. In William
Blake's poem The Lamb, children are biblically innocent and the speaker contrast himself
to the higher divinity. In this interpretation of children the speaker may possibly be
trying to use ignorance as an excuse for sin in his life. The lamb's natural gifts are
clearly envied by the speaker, the gifts being food, shelter, and happiness. William Blake
may have used this scene of fertile valleys to allow the reader to also feel the envy
towards the lamb's peaceful existence. "The lamb by no fault of its own is prosecuted by
speaker, later to be found incoherent with his own tortures and suffrages"(Paananem 40).

William Blake used direct dictation through his poem, "The Lamb", in distributing his
theorem, which we, humans, seek to find peace within our selves only after reestablishing
our identity with something pure. Humans are biblically damned to eternal unhappiness, the
past was the beginning of future's pain. The biblical reference to Adam and Eve is subtle
but clear enough with the envy portrayed by the speaker towards the lamb. The eternal
suffering will not cease until humans take acknowledgment of their own faults and own
sins. The speaker is seeking answers to his questions, about how the lamb gained such
natural innocence here. There are no clear answers to any of the speaker's questions
throughout the poem, causing the readers to stir within themselves the answer. The lamb
was only a conveyer of unattainable innocence. "Blake's wordage and dictation throughout
the poem is lyrical but also dead, in the sense that Blake spoke of things to narrowly"(O'
Neil 45). The lamb the natural ignorance, innocence, and ability to live amply; a thing
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