Margaret Mead And Ruth Benedict Essays, Book Reports, Term Papers

This essay Margaret Mead And Ruth Benedict Essays, Book Reports, Term Papers has a total of 440 words and 3 pages.

Margaret Mead and Ruth Benedict Ruth Benedict & Margaret Mead After high school, Ruth Benedict took a year off to travel overseas. Upon returning home she was unsure of what she wanted to do with her life. Years later, she married Stanley Benedict, a Biochemistry Professor at Cornell Medical School. In the fall of 1919, Ruth went back to school and began to focus more on anthropology. She studied under the famous diffusionist Franz Boas and became his assistant. Ruth taught Margaret Mead. Ruth and Margaret became good friends and developed a shared need of each other. Ruth concentrated most of her efforts on researching and studying different cultures on which many of her writings were based. She wrote of the differences between the cultures around the world and talked about different patterns related to culture and behavior. Ruth was very talented in summarizing and clearly arranging facts which were characteristic of her writings and ultimately her approach to anthropology; this, perhaps, may be the reason many of her reviews were published in professional papers and magazines throughout her career. Ruth Benedict was a very important figure in early anthropology and even more so in cultural anthropology. She was one of the first female anthropologists of her time. Her books serve as a re

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