Memnoch the devil Essay

This essay has a total of 683 words and 4 pages.


memnoch the devil





Book report on Memnoch The Devil
By: Lumi

Memnoch the Devil by Anne Rice Killing, kidnapping and battles, all parts of
Memnoch the Devil by Anne Rice. The main character, Lestat, is a
well-known and flamboyant vampire. In Memnoch the Devil, Lestat is faced
with a grim reality, causing his world to collapse around him. He learns
throughout this book, about the world, and the divine forces that encircle the
world’s existence. This book illustrates how Lestat’s morals, ignorance and
understanding are greatly affected by outside forces. In the beginning of the
book, Lestat, the quick and cunning vampire referred to as “the Brat Prince”
by his followers stalks a wealthy artifact smuggler. Lestat soon becomes
obsessed with his mortal victim, Roger, following him and trying to live his life
through Roger’s eyes. Lestat quickly develops a love for Roger, due to
Roger's take on life, and his robust actions. Lestat comes to the reality that
Roger is sick and evil, through his past was full of murders of family members
and mercenary like acts. Even all of this added to the fact that Roger was a
smuggler of godly artifacts, Lestat’s love for Roger still lived on. Lestat
observes his own actions and concludes that he himself is sick and evil as
well, due to his obsessive stalking. Lestat sees his morals are in fact worse
than those of Roger, when he brutally slays and mutates his carcass. With this
Lestat concludes that he was in fact the sick and evil one, more so than
Roger was. Lestat is soon encountered by Roger’s apparition and realizes the
grave mistake he made, fueled by his ignorance. Throughout his stalking of
Roger, Lestat encountered a demon, which he thought to be the devil. Lestat
was so occupied with his stalking; he neglected to take much note of this
demon. Lestat was confronted again by the demon the night he slaughtered
his beloved Roger. This caused Lestat to realize the devil was observing
Lestat’s own sick acts of evil and ignorance. As Roger’s ghost justified his
evil doings Lestat obtained that Roger was not evil, as he was thought to be.
This shocked Lestat, causing him to become more aware and observant,
resulting with Lestat’s ignorance dissipating. Though these changes in
awareness came too slowly, Lestat was soon kidnapped by the Devil, and
brought on a mortifying and appalling trip. This furthermore extended Lestat’s
awareness, when it was realized the Devil’s kidnapping was fueled by his
cruel acts and ignorance. Finally, through Lestat’s trek through Heaven and
Hell with the Devil, Lestat grasps an understanding that he had never before
conceived. Lestat sees images that take him to the extremes of his vampire
Continues for 2 more pages >>




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