Paper on Metaphysics

This essay has a total of 708 words and 3 pages.

Metaphysics

Metaphysics can be defined as an attempt to comprehend the basic characteristics of
reality. It is in fact so basic that it is all inclusive, whether something is observable
or not. It answers questions of what things must be like in order to exist and how to
differentiate from things that seem real but are not. A common thought is that reality is
defined as what we can detect from our five senses. This type of philosophy is called
empiricism, which is the idea that all knowledge comes from our senses. An empiricist must
therefore believe that what we can see, touch, taste, smell, and hear must be real and
that if we can not in fact see, touch, taste, smell, or hear something, it is definitely
not real. However, this is a problem because there are things that are real that cannot be
detected by our senses. Feelings and thoughts can not be detected, so according to a true
empiricist, they must not be real. Another example that is listed in the textbook is the
laws of gravity (Stewart 84). This is something that is in fact proven and we can see the
effects of it, but we can not see gravity itself. Once again, this would not be considered
to be "real." However, there are certain things that some people consider to be real, and
others consider them not to be. This typically comes into play when discussing religion.
Some people consider God to be real although they can not "sense" Him and others say that
He is not real, possibly because of the fact that they can not "sense" Him. Love is
another example. Many people believe that love is real, although it's not something they
can see. Other people do not believe in it.

Another important aspect of metaphysics is that reality is separate from our minds. We can
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