Paper on Midsummer Nights Dream

This essay has a total of 2682 words and 11 pages.

Midsummer Nights Dream

As with every play we read this quarter, we started A Midsummer
Night s Dream with only a text. Reading the script is the foundation of
Shakespeare, and the least evolved of the ways that one can experience
it. There is no one to interpret the words, no body movement o!r voice
inflection to indicate meaning or intention. All meaning that a reader
understands comes from the words alone. The simplicity of text provides
a broad ground for imagination, in that every reader can come away from
the text with a different conception of what went on. The words are
merely the puzzle pieces individuals put together to bring coherence and
logic to the play.
Although we all read generally the same words, we
can see that vastly different plays arise depending on who interprets
them. By interpreting the word-clues that Shakespeare wrote into the
script to direct the performance of the play, we were able to imagine
gestures, expressions, and movements appropriate to the intention of the
playwright. An example of this can be seen in the different Romeo and
Juliets: Luhrman clearly had a more modern vision after reading the
script than did Zeffirelli did only 18 years before. The live
performance at the CalPoly theatre also carried !with it a very
different feel less intense, more child-like and sweet with nearly the
same words. Reading also affects our experience in that without the
text, we would most likely not be able to enjoy Shakespeare at all;
having the text makes Shakespeare widely accessible (available for free
on the web) to all that desire it. Once the script is obtained, anyone
can perform Shakespeare even everyday, non-actor citizens put on
Shakespeare whether it be in parks, at school, or in a forest.
My experience reading Shakepearean plays has shown me that reading
is necessary and fundamental part of grasping the fullness of the works.
I had wanted to read A Midsummer Night's Dream for quite some time.
Besides being a play by Shakespeare, I believe my desire to do so came
from seeing bits and pieces of it done in Hollywood movies like Dead
Poet's Society. I didn't realize how much small exposures like! those
could cause me to prejudge the actual text; after I had read the play
for myself I was surprised at how much the text differed from my
expectations. Not knowing the whole of the plot, but rather only bits
and pieces, I expected a play filled with fairy dust and pixy-women
toe-dancing, laughing, with flowers everywhere, or something like Hylas
and the nymphs. What I did not expect was a group of rag-tag laborers
putting on a play, young females catfighting over their men, or Titania
being "enamored of an ass." (Act IV, Scene i, MND)
Even with surprises, though, the text by itself held little detail and richness in my mind.
I thought it a decent play, but certainly nothing like I had hoped, and
I didn't feel involved in it or connected to it in any way. One of the
things that did impressed me, though, was finding out for myself how
accessible Shakespeare actually is. When it came time for me to learn
my lines for Philostrate (MND), I copied them from a site on the
internet which posted the text in its entirety. I realized the!n how
lucky we are that plays like these survived through the ages, sometimes
probably making it from one hand to the next in a form no better than
the paperback I carried in my bag. Through my reading, the importance
of the text was impressed upon me, and I feel that I have gained a new
appreciation for the lasting and foundational qualities of pure script.
Viewing
Viewing a play adds a kind of second dimension to a textual
reading. While our primary impressions of a Shakespearean play are
established with the initial reading, those impressions are challenged
when we come into contact with a play performed. At this point we have
a first hand contrast between how we felt and how someone else felt
about the same play. Once we have sampled another's interpretations we
necessarily question ourselves on what we would have done differently,
had we directed the play. Perhaps something we expected to see on stage
was omitted; perhaps! something unusual was added. We might even sample
the same play dozens of times, all performed by different companies; it
is common, it is even expected, that none of the twelve interpretations
will be much the same. Unlike with reading, with viewing we are not
allowed to sample the play in whatever manner we want. As the audience,
our experiences are directed. We must resign ourselves to be the
two-hour subject of another's whims and methods.
This kind of challenge
is usually very enlightening, bringing new thoughts and perspectives
where we would otherwise have only our own. These new thoughts and
perspectives often materialize in the form of visual and auditory
details, mostly because the script stays generally the same. Viewing an
actual performance adds depth and detail to what was before only words.
We are given scenery, costumes, voices, faces, body movements, and other
forms of physical (rather than verbal) expression that contribute to a
particular feel. These types of details are in reality just instances of
the direct!or s influence, interpretations and preferences that cause us
to challenge our initial ideas, and accept us a possibly richer taste of
the play.
Because I was involved in two scenes of A Midsummer Night's Dream,
viewing this play on film held particular interest for me. I often
found myself looking to the films for ideas on how to play a character,
or a scene. Unfortunately (or perhaps fortunately, for originality's
sake), neither of the films we reviewed portrayed A Midsummer Night's
Dream in a way that particularly struck me. The 1935 Reinhardt edition
seemed to me overdone in nearly every respect. The characters were much
too Roman, the actresses quite over-dramatic, the fairies and
black-winged bats far too many in number, and the movie, in general, way
too long. The author of "Max Reinhardt and William Dieterle's A
Midsummer Night s Dream" described it well as, "a vast!
balletic-operatic extravaganza with huge casts, elaborate scenery, and
lavish costumes." (37, Jorgens) Overall it was a very large film. The
BBC version, on the other hand, erred in the opposite. It was slow,
relatively unemotional, and somewhat difficult to watch. After viewing
both these versions, I realized that my perceptions of the text were
much different than either of the films. I wanted something more
normal, less mystical, more possible however, the time for me to voice
those desires had not yet come.
Performing
This third dimension of experiencing Shakespeare comes only when a
reader-turned-viewer decides to become the actor. This aspect of the
Shakespearean experience is nearly the only of the three mentioned that
supports and encourages open creativity and self-expression. Now our
questions of, "what would I have done differently" have a chance to be
answered. It is in the acting that the text becomes less detached from
us, becoming more our own. We are no longer in !the passive mode, but
the active. Now, we wait for no one, cut lines if we like, say it fast,
draw it out. There are few, if any, limits to how a play can be done.
Continues for 6 more pages >>




  • Shakespeare and the Golbe
    Shakespeare and the Golbe These days most “theater go’ers” would pay one hundred dollars to see an exceptional performance of Romeo and Juliet , but as we go back to the year 1599, people crowded the doors of The Globe to pay a penny or less to see plays done by Shakespeare and many others. The Globe not only played (no pun intended) as a stage for blossoming actors, but also served as the stage for many well known playwrights and gave them the atmosphere and audience they needed to succeed. It
  • Shakespeare2
    Shakespeare2 William Shakespeare Shakespeare, William (1564-1616), was an English playwright and Poet, he is considered the greatest dramatist the world has ever known and the finest poet who has written in the English language. Shakespeare is known as the most popular author, no other writer\'s plays have been produced so many times in so many different places. Many reasons can be given for Shakespeare\'s popular audience, one is because of his broad understanding of human nature. Shakespeare u
  • The Great Gatsbysuper notes automatic A
    the Great Gatsbysuper notes automatic A Have you ever felt that there were two of you battling for control of the person you call yourself? Have you ever felt that you weren\'t quite sure which one you wanted to be in charge? All of us have at least two selves: one who wants to work hard, get good grades, and be successful; and one who would rather lie in the sun and listen to music and daydream. To understand F. Scott Fitzgerald, the man and the writer, you must begin with the idea of doublenes
  • Fools in shakespeare Puck
    fools in shakespeare Puck Shakespeare is a master of the telling of stories. When we observe his works, we see the struggle of the main characters with themselves and others. Many a time there is lack of reason as the protagonists fight the demons, which keep them from their goal, but the beauty of Shakespeare is that reason is usually portrayed in the form of a fool. When we think of fools, we think of those with little capacity of understanding, but in Shakespeare, fools are usually mediators,
  • Gatsby1
    Gatsby1 Although the precise date of many of Shakespeare’s plays is in doubt, his dramatic career is generally divided into four periods: (1) the period up to 1594, (2) the years from 1594 to 1600, (3) the years from 1600 to 1608, and (4) the period after 1608. Because of the difficulty of dating Shakespeare’s plays and the lack of conclusive facts about his writings, these dates are approximate and can be used only as a convenient framework in which to discuss his development. In all periods, t
  • Gatsby1
    Gatsby1 Although the precise date of many of Shakespeare’s plays is in doubt, his dramatic career is generally divided into four periods: (1) the period up to 1594, (2) the years from 1594 to 1600, (3) the years from 1600 to 1608, and (4) the period after 1608. Because of the difficulty of dating Shakespeare’s plays and the lack of conclusive facts about his writings, these dates are approximate and can be used only as a convenient framework in which to discuss his development. In all periods, t
  • The Great Gatsbysuper notes
    the Great Gatsbysuper notes Have you ever felt that there were two of you battling for control of the person you call yourself? Have you ever felt that you weren\'t quite sure which one you wanted to be in charge? All of us have at least two selves: one who wants to work hard, get good grades, and be successful; and one who would rather lie in the sun and listen to music and daydream. To understand F. Scott Fitzgerald, the man and the writer, you must begin with the idea of doubleness, or twones
  • None Provided8
    None Provided8 For many centuries people have found theater to be an excellent form of entertainment. The public\'s appreciation for such entertainment is based upon different theatrical themes. Whether it is a lighthearted comedy, that is most certain to lift anyone\'s spirits, a passionate romance, that stirs our innermost quixotic emotions, or a dire tragedy, that finds no rhyme or reason in our so-called "fair" concept of life. These types of plays appeal to the different aspects of humanity
  • Romeo and Juliet Compared to Much Ado About Nothin
    Romeo and Juliet Compared to Much Ado About Nothing William Shakespeare has written many different categories of plays: comedies, tragedies, romances, and histories. Comparisons are abundant between many of Shakespeare’s works. Numerous comparisons can be made in characters, plot, and speech between Romeo and Juliet, which is a tragedy, and Much Ado About Nothing, which is a comedy. First, corresponding characters in both plays include villains, lovers, and friends in addition to characters who
  • Romeo o romeo
    romeo o romeo English 102 19 April 1999 Why Romeo and Juliet was so popular in Shakespeare’s time and why even today it is still so popular? William Shakespeare was born on April 23, 1564 in the town of Stratford-upon-Avon, England to Mary Arden and John Shakespeare. He was the third of eight children. He went to a local grammar school, where his studies included Latin and Greek (Debnam). At the age of eighteen he married Anne Hathaway who was eight years older than he. Their marriage was hurrie
  • Shakespeare and the Golbe en
    Shakespeare and the Golbe en These days most “theater go’ers” would pay one hundred dollars to see an exceptional performance of Romeo and Juliet , but as we go back to the year 1599, people crowded the doors of The Globe to pay a penny or less to see plays done by Shakespeare and many others. The Globe not only played (no pun intended) as a stage for blossoming actors, but also served as the stage for many well known playwrights and gave them the atmosphere and audience they needed to succeed.
  • Shakespeare Overall Essay History and Effects on H
    Shakespeare Overall Essay History and Effects on History SHAKESPEARE Let me tell you a story of two young lovers torn apart by the wrath of their parents… oh, you\'ve heard this one already? How about the story of the evil villain plotting to overthrow his king? Heard that one too? Surprisingly enough, these stories came into creation over two hundred years ago. The wonder lies not in the stories, but in the man behind them. William Shakespeare is really the defining icon for modern literature.
  • Tragedies
    Tragedies “Shakespeare is not our poet but the world’s,” stated by W. S. Landor in 1846 (Lamb 340). William Shakespeare has given the world a whole new perspective on poetry. Usually the pieces he has written are either hated or loved. He has written comedies, romances, and tragedies. All of his pieces have been wonderful but the ones that stand out the most are his tragedies. The elements he uses in his tragedies set them above all the rest. All the tragedies, which include Romeo and Juliet; Ha
  • Twelfth Night
    Twelfth Night Twelfth Night “Twelfth Night is a comedy of light and shade. Its characters are not unreservedly happy and the events are not unreservedly humorous.” Discuss. As a comedy, Twelfth Night is obviously intending to not only entertain its audience but also point out problems in society. It is imperative to entire merit of the play not to be realistic but to allow for empathy. Therefor to have a comedy of complete lightheartedness there would be no balance and hence no avenue for audien
  • Much ado about nothing
    much ado about nothing What is love? Many people would answer this question differently. People fall in love, get married, and form families with children, pets and houses. Every family differs from one another. The reason that no identical families exist in this world is that people understand love in their own ways. There is no correct answer describing what love really is. That is why this topic is so frequently discussed and analyzed by psychologists, writers, and just by common people in p
  • Much ado about nothing
    much ado about nothing What is love? Many people would answer this question differently. People fall in love, get married, and form families with children, pets and houses. Every family differs from one another. The reason that no identical families exist in this world is that people understand love in their own ways. There is no correct answer describing what love really is. That is why this topic is so frequently discussed and analyzed by psychologists, writers, and just by common people in p
  • Shakespeare Comedies
    Shakespeare Comedies Shakespeares comedies can be recognized in terms of plot, structure and characters. We can see that Shakespearean comedies follow the same structural pattern, a basic plot on which the play is based. For example, a key feature of all comedies is that they depend upon the resolution of their plots. However, Shakespeares comedies are distinguishable, as some are classed as comic dramas and others as romantic comedies. In comic drama, there is usually a motif of a place wher
  • Tom Stoppard
    Tom Stoppard Tom Stoppard: A Critic of The Modern Age Tom Stoppard is one of the twentieth century\'s most interesting and creative playwrights. He uses his art form to criticize society\'s inability to handle the thought that we are governed by chaos. The modern world has created fate as an excuse for not doing anything to shape or change our outcome. Stoppard uses his plays as a mirror held up to society, showing his audience the ridiculousness of leaving everything up to fate. Tom Stoppard i
  • Twelfth Night or What You Will
    Twelfth Night or What You Will Twelfth Night, or What You Will With Twelfth Night, Shakespeare provides us with an extravagantly farfetched and thoroughly entertaining romantic comedy. He goes to all extremes to make this play unpredictable and unconventional, while staying within the boundaries of earlier romantic comedy enough to make this his most exaggerated, supreme romantic comedy. In an age where popularity for romantic comedy had already greatly dwindled, Shakespeare did everything poss
  • Midsummers nights dream
    midsummers nights dream A MIDSUMMER NIGHTS DREAM by William Shakespeare I. Matching *Match the description on the left with its best fitting answer on the right. Put the answers letter in the space provided. (Some answers will not be used.)* e.1.) the city in which most of a.) Hippolyta and Theseus the play takes place b.) Verona f.2.) the king of the fairies c.) Titania and Oberon a.3.) the only couple to be wed d.) Pyramus as of [I. i.].(both partners give consent) e.) Athens g. 4.) Puck
  • The Taming of the Shrew
    The Taming of the Shrew The Taming of the Shrew The Taming of the Shrew, written by William Shakespeare, is historical proof that flirting and temptation, relating to the opposite sex, has been around since the earliest of times. Because males and females continue to interact, the complications in this play remain as relevant and humorous today as they did to Elizabethan audiences. This is a very fun play, full of comedy and sexual remarks. Its lasting impression imprints itself into the minds
  • Comedy or Tragedy
    Comedy or Tragedy Shakespeare’s theatrical works are generally categorized into three all encompassing groups: the uplifting comedy, the lamented tragedy, and the excruciatingly boring history play. However, things can get a little confusing when you end up with a comedy like Measure for Measure or a tragedy like Titus Andronicus. Often we find that many of Shakespeare’s plays do not fit into their ascribed categories, but is it the plays that don’t fit the categories, or the reverse? Are the g
  • Comedy versus Tragedy
    Comedy versus Tragedy Undeniable similarities can be drawn between two Shakespearean masterpieces, "A Midsummer-Night\'s Dream" and "Romeo and Juliet". These similarities involve themes and classical Shakespearean character types. Both plays have a distinct pair of lovers, the confused couple, Hermia and Lysander, and the romantic couple, Romeo and Juliet. Both works could have also easily been transformed into the opposite with a few effortless modifications. A tragedy is a play in which one o
  • Ephesian Effusions
    Ephesian Effusions Shakespeare\'s Comedy of Errors is a madcap romp of mistakings and misadventures, wrapping together two Plautine comedies sauced with Scripture and Renaissance poetry. Yet the tangled web of estranged family that Shakespeare weaves holds significant differences from any of his originals, pointing to ideas about family and marriage that Shakespeare no doubt held, and was to develop further in later works. Plautus\' Menaechmi yields a basic framework for Shakespeare\'s plot: tw
  • Histories
    histories The histories have traditionally been interpreted against a background of Tudor moral and political philosophy. They have been arranged in chronological order of the reigns of the kings, and by this plan the full significance of the relationship of the plays becomes apparent. Although the precise date of many of Shakespeares plays is in doubt, his dramatic career is generally divided into four periods. The period up to 1594 is Shakespeare\'s first period of writing called his apprent
  • How Two Shakespearean Couples Resolve the Conflict
    How Two Shakespearean Couples Resolve the Conflict in Their Relationships How Two Shakespearean Couples Resolve the Conflict in Their Relationships In Shakespeares comedies, A Midsummer Nights Dream and As You Like It, the playwright deals with love, relationships, and how couples come to terms with their problems and resolve the conflicts within themselves and with those around them. Both of the plays point out that when individuals look within themselves and face the issues that are keeping
  • Iago
    Iago Shakespeare\'s Antagonists and "Honest" Iago James L. Gillis IV Essay- Knaublauch During this most recent semester we, as a class, have waded through a sufficient sampling of works by the good bard. During this experience, a plethora of characters have successfully held the spotlight, evoked aspects of the nature of man, and twisted the extremes of human emotions into knots. By retreating to ponder these noble souls and most horrid villains, one immediately recognizes a character worthy of
  • Religon in Shakespeare
    Religon in Shakespeare RELIGION IN SHAKESPEARE The purpose of this web page is that of introducing you, an interested web user into the religious nature of William Shakespeare\'s plays. This page covers three topics surrounding Shakespeare\'s work: the of 16th Century England, Shakespeare\'s (school, parents, & Stratford itself), and a brief introduction into the impact his society and upbringing had upon his . In no way is this page comprehensive in its coverage of Shakespeare and religion (ho
  • Shakespeare and catholicism
    shakespeare and catholicism RELIGION IN SHAKESPEARE The purpose of this web page is that of introducing you, an interested web user into the religious nature of William Shakespeare\'s plays. This page covers three topics surrounding Shakespeare\'s work: the of 16th Century England, Shakespeare\'s (school, parents, & Stratford itself), and a brief introduction into the impact his society and upbringing had upon his . In no way is this page comprehensive in its coverage of Shakespeare and religio
  • Shakespeare and catholicism
    shakespeare and catholicism RELIGION IN SHAKESPEARE The purpose of this web page is that of introducing you, an interested web user into the religious nature of William Shakespeare\'s plays. This page covers three topics surrounding Shakespeare\'s work: the of 16th Century England, Shakespeare\'s (school, parents, & Stratford itself), and a brief introduction into the impact his society and upbringing had upon his . In no way is this page comprehensive in its coverage of Shakespeare and religio
  • Shakespeare comedy
    shakespeare comedy Shakespearean Comedy Shakespeare wrote many plays during his lifetime. Some of his plays have similar comedic characteristics and then other plays are the exact opposite of comedy. Shakespeare wrote tragedies, romance, history, comedy and problem plays all with great success. During the performance of these plays there was no scenery so great time was taken when developing the characters and the plot so the plays would be entertaining. A Midsummers Night\'s Dream and Much Ado
  • The Truth Behind William Shakespears Hamlet
    The Truth Behind William Shakespears Hamlet The Truth Behind William Shakespeares Hamlet A Tragedy must not be the spectacle of a perfectly good man brought from prosperity to adversity. For this merely shocks us-Aristotle-300bc (pg. 229,Shakespearean criticism, vol. 3) Thesis: William Shakespeare, one of the greatest dramatists in the world, has been famous and well known since the early 1600s. Some of his greatest works have been reproduced hundreds of times. He wrote poems, sonnets, play
  • Hamlet
    hamlet William Shakespeare, perhaps the greatest western playwright of all time, authored a number of works consisting of sonnets, comedies, and tragedies. In his brilliant career, Shakespeare created literary works of art. What makes Shakespeare unlike any other writer of his time, or thereafter, is his ability to organize a realistic plot, manage themes, and develop characters within his works. As well, Shakespeare\'s ability to provoke feeling and reaction to his writing is also what sets hi
  • Hamlet
    hamlet William Shakespeare, perhaps the greatest western playwright of all time, authored a number of works consisting of sonnets, comedies, and tragedies. In his brilliant career, Shakespeare created literary works of art. What makes Shakespeare unlike any other writer of his time, or thereafter, is his ability to organize a realistic plot, manage themes, and develop characters within his works. As well, Shakespeare\'s ability to provoke feeling and reaction to his writing is also what sets hi
  • Tribute To Shakespeare
    Tribute To Shakespeare Tribute to Shakespeare Shakespeare was an English playwright and poet. He is generally considered the "greatest dramatist the world has ever known" and the "finest poet who has written in the English language" (World Book Encyclopedia). Shakespeare has also been the world\'s most popular author. No other writer\'s plays have been produced so many times or read so widely in so many countries. Many reasons can be given for Shakespeare\'s appeal. But his fame basically is on
  • Supernatural elements in shakespeare
    supernatural elements in shakespeare No one questions the fact that William Shakespeare is a pure genius when it comes to creating immortal characters whose characteristics transcends those of the normal supernatural beings, but most students of literature agree that his uses of the supernatural aren\'t merely figments of his creative imagination. Every man, woman, and child is influenced by the age into which they are born and Shakespeare was no exception. Not only does his use of supernatural
  • The Winters Tale: The Tragedy Within A Romance
    The Winters Tale: The Tragedy Within A Romance The Winter\'s Tale: The Tragedy Within A Romance In 1623, the complete works of Shakespeare were published in the First Folio. Within this Folio were the works of Shakespeare categorized by their genre. There were tragedies, histories, comedies, and the final four were romances. Prior to this time, romance was not a widespread genre in anyone\'s writings. We can see by means of the genealogy of writing, that the romance we know today was created thr
  • Film Adaptation of Shakespearean Comedy: Twelfth N
    Film Adaptation of Shakespearean Comedy: Twelfth Night and Much Ado About Nothing 6. "Film versions of Shakespeare comedies can lie anywhere on a spectrum between an exploration of serious issues and simple comedy of a farcical or uncomplicated nature." Discuss with reference to two films. Shakespearean plays are complex, intricate pieces of work in which a diverse range of interpretations and readings can be made. This is particularly true of his comedies, where the light-hearted humour is ofte
  • A Study In The True Authorship Of Shakespeare
    A Study In The True Authorship Of Shakespeare Ask anyone who Shakespeare was, and he or she will immediately rattle off at least three different plays that were required readings in English, not to mention a few blockbuster movies bearing his name. Many revere the works of Shakespeare as paramount in the world of literature, dedicating entire books, classes and festivals to the study and celebration of his work. Although the ancient language is a common stumbling block for even the most seasoned
  • Shakespear
    shakespear Shakespeare, William Born in 1564, William Shakespeare lived in Stratford. His father, John Shakespeare, was successful in the leather business during Shakespeare\'s early childhood but later met with financial difficulties. During his prosperous years his father was also involved in municipal affairs, holding the offices of alderman and bailiff during the 1560s. While little is known of Shakespeare\'s boyhood, he probably attended the grammar school in Stratford, where he would have
  • Christopher Marlowe
    Christopher Marlowe Christopher Marlowe Many major and influential authors emerged during the Renaissance. Among these talented individuals was Christopher Marlowe. Marlowe and his fellow writers of the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, impacted the course of writing, which preceded their life. Their works continue to be read and studied by numerous people, to this day. Christopher Marlowe was a dominant English poet and playwright, who perhaps was William Shakespeare\'s most impor
  • The Taming Of The Shrew: An Critique
    The Taming Of The Shrew: An Critique The Taming of the Shrew: An Critique The Taming of the Shrew is one of the earliest comedies written by sixteenth and seventeenth century English bard, William Shakespeare. Some scholars believe it may have been his first work written for the stage as well as his first comedy (Shakespearean 310). The earliest record of it being performed on stage is in 1593 or 1594. It is thought by many to be one of Shakespeare\'s most immature plays (Cyclopedia 1106). In Th
  • WOMEN?S ROLE IN SHAKESPEAREAN TRAGEDY
    WOMEN?S ROLE IN SHAKESPEAREAN TRAGEDY In Shakespeare\'s tragedies and his plays in general, we can come across several types of female characters. Their influence with other characters and their purpose or role, often underestimated like women themselves, will be this essay\'s main subject. Women in Shakespearean plays have always had important roles, sometimes even the leading role. Whether they create the main conflicts and base of the plays, or bring up interesting moral and cultural question
  • Harold Pinter
    Harold Pinter HAROLD PINTER? WHO THE HELL IS THAT? Harold Pinter is one of the greatest British dramatists of our time. Pinter has written a number of absurd masterpieces including The Birthday Party, The Caretaker, The Homecoming, Betrayal, Old Times, and Ashes to Ashes. He has also composed a number of radio plays and several volumes of poetry. His screenplays include The French Lieutenant\'s Woman, The Last Tycoon, and The Handmaid\'s Tale. He has received numerous awards including the Berlin
  • Disguise In Shakespearean Come
    Disguise In Shakespearean Come William Shakespeare was a jack of all trades. He could do it all - histories, tragedies, comedies, romances. While some people may say that Shakespeare\'s tragedies are the most popular, his comedies are as popular as the tragedies, if not more. However, comedies of Shakespeare\'s time are not what people of the twentieth century perceive to be "comedy." Some of the elements of Shakespearean comedy are similar to today\'s comedy, such as physical comedy. People of
  • On Hamlets delay
    On Hamlets delay William Shakespeare, perhaps the greatest playwright of all time, authored a number of works consisting of sonnets, comedies, and tragedies. In his brilliant career, Shakespeare created literary works of art. What makes Shakespeare unlike any other writer of his time, or thereafter, is his ability to organize a realistic plot, manage themes, and develop characters within his works. As well, Shakespeare¡¯s ability to provoke feeling and reaction to his writing is also what sets
  • Othello review
    othello review Shakespeare has produced an incredibly large library of work, including 38 plays and countless sonnets. His plays are divided into four main sections: the Histories, the Tragedies, the Comedies, and the Romances. Othello falls under Tragedy, as it ends with the death of numerous characters, including the principals. Shakespeare\'s work has been produced since the Renaissance in all artistic mediums from the original theater to opera, symphony, film, and ballet. It has also been co
  • Shakespeares Use Of Trickery And Disguise In His P
    Shakespeares Use Of Trickery And Disguise In His Plays Shakespeare\'s Use of Trickery and Disguise In His Plays Shakespeare uses similar comic elements to effect similar outcomes in his works. Many of his plays utilize trickery and disguise to accomplish similar endings. Trickery plays a major role in The Merchant of Venice and drives most of the action, while mistaken identity, specifically Portia\'s disguise as the learned attorney\'s representative, plays a major role in the resolution of the
  • Twelfth Night
    Twelfth Night Twelfth Night "Twelfth Night is a comedy of light and shade. Its characters are not unreservedly happy and the events are not unreservedly humorous." Discuss. As a comedy, Twelfth Night is obviously intending to not only entertain its audience but also point out problems in society. It is imperative to entire merit of the play not to be realistic but to allow for empathy. Therefor to have a comedy of complete lightheartedness there would be no balance and hence no avenue for audien
  • Gender Roles in Shakespeare
    Gender Roles in Shakespeare Gender Roles in Shakespeare It is a peculiar feature of Shakespeare\'s plays that they both participate in and reflect the ideas of gender roles in Western society. To the extent that they reflect existing notions about the \'proper\' roles of men and women, they can be said to be a product of their society. However, since they have been studied, performed, and taught for five hundred years, they may be seen as formative of contemporary notions about the relationships