Mirranda Essay

This essay has a total of 1113 words and 5 pages.

mirranda



The Supreme Court of the United States of America often makes decisions, which change this
great nation in a great way. Often there is a disagreement over their decision: the court
itself is often split. The impact of the Courts decision creates discussions and on
occasion, violence. This is what happened in the case of Miranda v. Arizona in 1966, this
case proven to be one of the most controversial cases in the history of this great nation
and its people. This case changed history of this country and left a tremendous impact,
which many tried to revisit and change in some way or another.

Ernest Miranda was born in 1940 in a little town Mesa, Arizona. His father had emigrated
from Mexico and now was supporting the family of tree as a house painter. In 1946 Ernest
Miranda lost his mother. His mother's death seemed to mark the end of the happy childhood
and the beginning of the troubled youth ("Miranda v. Arizona" 14). It was in the
elementary school were Mr. Miranda a chose his way, his discipline was not acceptable his
attendance record shows more absences then days present. He was able to finish the 8th
grade but his latter education was stopped by his growing criminal activities his first
serious arrest was for car theft, he was convicted and received probation ("Miranda v.
Arizona" 14). From then on his criminal record growth to inorams size, it shows that he
was arrested and convicted for crime such as burglary for which he was convicted and sends
to State Industrial School for Boys at Fort Grant. Only a month after his release he
arrested and charged with attempted rape and assault. He was found guilty and returned to
Fort Grand in January 1957 Miranda was released from Fort Grant two month latter he was
arrested in California for curfew violations and Peeping Tom activities five month after
hi was arrested for armed robbery. He was released because the state did not have enough
evidence to convict him ("Miranda v. Arizona" 14). During Miranda life he tried many times
to start over and start a new life as an obedient citizen. He joined the army but was
undesirably discharged. Again his criminal activities entered his life. In 1959 hi was
arrested and convicted of auto theft and was sentenced up to a year in federal prison in
Ohio later he was transferred to Lompoc, California which was closer to home. He was
released in January 1961("Miranda v. Arizona" 14). Next two years in his life Miranda life
were spend in some what calm and normal way he moved in with Twaila Hoffman and her
children however his criminal past followed him in March 1963 he was arrested and charged
with kidnapping and rape.

Lois Ann Jameson (not her real name) took a bus to Seventh and Marlette streets. She
stepped of the bus few minutes past mid night and began walking toward her home on Citrus
Way. Suddenly a car pulled out of the driveway blocking the sidewalk. The driver got out
and pushed Jameson in, then after tying her hands and ankles the men drove out toward a
deserted area. He told the women to take her cloth off and then raped her allowed her to
get dressed and took her back to the neigborhood where he had previously kidnapped her.
Two police officers Cooley and Young arrived at the seine and as the result of the short
investigation Miranda came out to be their suspect. After checking Miranda lengthy
Continues for 3 more pages >>




  • Court Cases
    Court Cases Marbury v Madison Issue: President Adams appointed several Federal Justices as "midnight appointments", President Madison did not want them and witheld their pay, one of the judges brought suit for back pay Decision Against Madison Signifigence: Set up the policy of Judicial Review Dartmouth College v Woodward Issue: New Hampshire was attempting to regulate Dartmouth college who claimed they couldn\'t because they had a royal charter Decision: For Dartmouth Signifigence: Declared the
  • Warren court
    Warren court The Warren Court and the Pursuit for Justice The Warren Court and the Pursuit for Justice written by Morton J. Horwitz is a description of the many Supreme Court cases that Chief Justice Earl Warren, along with other Justices presided on during this critical time period in American History. The author begins the book by explaining who the different Justices that served on the Court were and when they were appointed to it. Horwitz explained the different backgrounds that the Justices
  • Courts as legislators
    courts as legislators Courts As Legislators The purpose of this paper is to show that although not originally intended to, some our modern day courts in the United States have in essence become legislators. I will give a brief overview of the history of courts and site some cases where the decisions handed down or the opinions of the court have set precedent in the way the law is understood and enforced. As long as man has been on this earth there have been conflicts or disputes that needed to b
  • Mirranda
    mirranda The Supreme Court of the United States of America often makes decisions, which change this great nation in a great way. Often there is a disagreement over their decision: the court itself is often split. The impact of the Courts decision creates discussions and on occasion, violence. This is what happened in the case of Miranda v. Arizona in 1966, this case proven to be one of the most controversial cases in the history of this great nation and its people. This case changed history of t
  • Nothing5
    nothing5 In 1717, Bishop Hoadly told King George I, "Whoever hath an absolute authority to interpret written or spoken laws; it is he who is truly the lawgiver to all intents and purposes and not the person who wrote or spoke them (Pollack, 153)." Early sentiments similar these have blossomed into a large scale debate over which branch of our government has the power to overturn laws that do not follow the foundations of our democratic system; the constitution. In this paper I will discuss the h
  • US Supreme Court
    US Supreme Court The Supreme Court is the highest governing body that is known to us as the people of the United States of America. In the 1998-99 term, the Supreme Court is slated to hear cases on subjects as diverse as business monopolies, labor unions, health insurers, initiative petitions and due process. The justices will also revisit the issue of sexual harassment. The following will just be an overview of how the Supreme Court operates. I will try to point out many things throughout the c
  • Uranus
    Uranus Uranus 2,870,990,000 km (19.218 AU) from the Sun, Uranus hangs on the wall of space as a mysterious blue green planet. With a mass of 8.683e25 kg and a diameter of 51,118 km at the equator, Uranus is the third largest planet in our solar system. It has been described as a planet that was slugged a few billion years ago by a large onrushing object, knocked down (never to get up), and now proceeds to roll around an 84-year orbit on its belly. As the strangest of the Jovian planets, the des
  • Due Process Revolution
    Due Process Revolution The great promise of America that has made a British colony in the 50 States today is Freedom. Many Freedoms which still today cause people to flock to the United States. The history of these freedoms starts centuries ago and has developed, revolutionized, and persisted all the way through today. At the core of these Freedoms is the idea of Due Process, the idea that everyone has rights and freedom until they are deprived of them arbitrarily, or by the will of a just thir
  • Miranda
    Miranda The Miranda rights all started in 1963. Ernest Miranda was taken into custody by Phoenix police as a suspect for the kidnapping and rape of a girl. The Phoenix police department questioned Ernest for two vigorous hours. Miranda finally confessed orally to the crime, and then wrote out a statement admitting to the crime and describing what he had done. Mirandas trial came to date; the crime was admitted despite his lawyers advice and he was convicted and sentenced. Three years later Mi
  • Miranda vs arizona
    miranda vs arizona In 1966 the Supreme Court made a ruling that every American would always know and remember. The case was Miranda versus The State of Arizona. Early in 1963, an 18-year-old woman was kidnapped and raped in Phoenix, Arizona. The police investigated the case, and soon found and arrested a poor and mentally disturbed man. The name of this man was Ernesto Miranda. Miranda was 23 years old when he was arrested. He confessed to the kidnapping and the rape after two hours of question
  • Oregon v elstad
    oregon v elstad OREGON v ELSTAD 470 U.S. 298, 105 S. Ct. 1285, 84 L.Ed. 2d 222 (1985) MERITS: Officers Burke and McAllister of the Polk County, Oregon Sheriff\'s office, on the basis of a witness\' statement, obtained an arrest warrant for Michael Elstad, who was suspected of burglary. The officers went to Elstad\'s home and were escorted to his room by his mother. After instructing the respondent to dress and accompany them to the living room, Officer McAllister took Elstad\'s mother into the
  • Miranda Rights
    Miranda Rights The constitution was designed to have basic laws to govern by and at the same time providing citizens with the basic rights of life, liberty and happiness ( which later became property). These terms are pretty vague thus they often need to be given specific meaning or interpretation in a courtroom. The constitution also includes a set of amendments that are called the bill of rights, because they mainly deal with rights of he “people” and citizens of the United States. The fifth
  • Miranda v arizona
    Miranda v arizona Miranda vs. Arizona was a case that considered the rights of the defendants in criminal cases in regards to the power of the government. Individual rights did not change with the Miranda decision, however it created new constitutional guidelines for law enforcement, attorneys, and the courts. The guidelines ensure that the individual rights of the fifth, sixth and the fourteenth amendment are protected. This decision requires that unless a suspect in custody has been informed
  • Mirandarights
    Mirandarights In 1966, the U. S. Supreme Court handed down its landmark decision in Miranda v. Arizona. The Miranda decision was a departure from the established law in the area of police interrogation. Prior to Miranda, a confession would be suppressed only if a court determined it resulted from some actual coercion, threat, or promise. The Miranda decision was intended to protect suspects of their 5th Amendment right of no self-incrimination. The verdict of Miranda v. Arizona is an efficient
  • Supreme Court
    Supreme Court Restraint & Activism Judicial activism is loosely defined as decisions or judgements handed down by judges that take a broad interpretation of the constitution. It is a decision that is more of a reflection of how the judge thinks the law should be interpreted rather than how the law has or was intended to be interpreted. There are many examples of judicial activism; examples include the opinions of Sandra Day OConnor in the Lynch v. Donnelly and the Wallace v. Jaffree trials. Sa
  • The Future of Miranda
    The Future of Miranda The Future of Miranda Why is the future of Miranda in doubt? The Supreme Court decision of Miranda v. Arizona in 1966 set a federal standard to read all suspects the rights that they hold. These rights include the right to remain silent, the right to an attorney, the right for an attorney to be appointed if one cannot afford one, and the right for the attorney to be present during questions. For about 33 years all evidence during questioning has been thrown out in cases wh
  • The Law of Selfdefense
    The Law of Selfdefense The Law of Self-defense CONCURRING OPINION: We concur with Justice Whites interpretation of Tennessee State law. However, we propose that more restrictive standards should be used by policemen when dealing with imminently dangerous circumstances. The necessity standard that White proposes for governing the use of lethal force strikes the right balance in regulating violence. He insists that the police act reasonably by evaluating whether the felons interest in life outw
  • The Miranda Rights
    The Miranda Rights In 1966, the U. S. Supreme Court handed down its landmark decision in Miranda v. Arizona. The Miranda decision was a departure from the established law in the area of police interrogation. Prior to Miranda, a confession would be suppressed only if a court determined it resulted from some actual coercion, threat, or promise. The Miranda decision was intended to protect suspects of their 5th Amendment right of no self-incrimination. The verdict of Miranda v. Arizona is an effic
  • Supreme Court Cases
    Supreme Court Cases Supreme Court Cases Engle vs. Vitale Case: In the late 1950\'s the New York State Board of Regents wrote and adopted a prayer, which was supposed to be nondenominational. The board recommended that students in public schools say the prayer on a voluntary basis every morning. In New Hyde Park Long Island a parent sued the school claiming that the prayer violated the first amendment of the constitution. The school argued that the prayer was nondenominational and did not attempt
  • Explanation of Miranda
    Explanation of Miranda Miranda Rights In this paper I am going to be discussing the Miranda rights. What they mean to you, what they entitle you to, and how they came to be used in law enforcement today. I am discussing this topic because, one it is useful to me as a police officer, two they can be very difficult to understand, and three if they are not read properly to you when you are placed under an arrest it could actually get you off. I will start off by discussing the history and some deta
  • The court of the last resot
    the court of the last resot The Supreme Court: The Court of Last Resort by Jennifer F. Long Criminal Justice, CJ 6622 Dr. O\'Connor 29 September 2003 At the apex of our federal court system stands the United States Supreme Court. It stands as the ultimate authority in constitutional interpretation and its decision can be changed only by a constitutional amendment. Two documents are responsible for its creation which is the Constitution, which explicitly creates the Supreme Court, and the Judicia
  • The bill of rights
    the bill of rights 1776 brought a declaration of and a war for independence to Britain\'s North American colonies. While they had all acted in concert to reach this decision, their memories of colonial life under the centralized British monarchy had lasting effect upon their views of what the federal government of their new republic would have the power to do. In the years following the Declaration of Independence, Congress came up with the Articles of Confederation to loosely govern the new rep
  • Miranda vs. Arizona
    Miranda vs. Arizona Miranda vs. Arizona: This case had to do with an Ernest Miranda who raped a Patty McGee*. After extracting a written confession from the rapist about the situation, Miranda\'s lawyer argued that it was not valid since the Phoenix Police Department failed to read Miranda his rights, also in violation of the Sixth Amendment which is the right to counsel. Some factors that helped support Miranda\'s arguments were that the suspect had requested and been denied an opportunity to c
  • When the founders of the United States of America
    Eng When the founders of the United States of America got together to write the Constitution they anticipated certain issues that might occur between the Federal Government and the individual citizen. It was these concerns that caused them to include certain civil liberties in the Constitution. A civil liberty is an individual right protected by the Constitution against the powers of the government. (Sidlow and Henschen 2001, p. 470). After leaving the command of Britain, the citizens of the col
  • SHOCK INCARCERATION
    SHOCK INCARCERATION Miranda Warnings You have the right to remain silent, anything you say can and will be used against you in a court of law. You have the right to speak to an attorney, and to have an attorney present during police questioning, if you cannot afford an attorney, one will be appointed to you by the state. These words have preceded every arrest since Miranda v. Arizona 1966, informing every detained person of his rights before any type of formal police questioning begins. This iss
  • The 5th Amendment
    The 5th Amendment The 5th Amendment Basically, the 5th Amendment states that no one shall be charged with capital crimes without a Grand Jury\'s permission, except in cases regarding the military while under service in wartime or public danger. No one can be put on trial again for the same crime. You can\'t be forced to testify yourself. That no one should be executed, jailed, or have property seized without a legal precedent. Also you can\'t be put through cruel or unusually punishment. If priv
  • The Mysteries Of Uranus
    The Mysteries Of Uranus The Mysteries of Uranus Jeremy Colin Newell Hanover College Hanover, Indiana April 5, 2001 Astronomy 145 ¡V Stars, Galaxies, and the Universe 2,870,990,000 km from the Sun, Uranus hangs on the wall of space as a mysterious blue green planet. With a mass of 8.683e25 kg and a diameter of 51,118 km at the equator, Uranus is the third largest planet in our solar system. It has been described as a planet that was slugged a few billion years ago by a large onrushing object, kn
  • John Marshall Harlan Ii
    John Marshall Harlan Ii #9;John Marshall Harlan II was born on May 20, 1899 in Chicago, Illinois. He was born to John Maynard Harlan, an attorney, and Elizabeth Flagg Harlan. John Marshall Harlan II came from a long line of political servants, of whom his grandfather is probably most notable. John Marshall Harlan I, whom John Marshall Harlan II was named after, sat on the Supreme Court as an Associate Justice from 1877 to 1911. Johan Marshall Harlan II is best remembered as the lone dissenter of