Moliere?s Tartuffe Essay

This essay has a total of 511 words and 3 pages.

Moliere?s Tartuffe






In Moliere's description of a satire, he was very direct as to the function and
objectives of ones are. The function is to correct men's problems, using satire to ridicule
them and expose them to the public opinion. Although the satire is making fun of many
things, things in the church and organized religion. Tartuffe has many themes that
reoccur throughout the play. The time period which this piece was written, was know as
The Age Of Reason. One of the main ideas and attitudes during this period was, reason
must always control passion. Due this attitude, one theme that constantly appears through
out the play is the battle between reason and passion.

In Act II, Scene 4 one of the major conflicts between reason and passion is played
out. Valere confronts Mariane with the rumors he has heard about her marrying Tartuffe.
Throughout this entire confrontation, they are letting their passions stop them from
getting what they truly want, each other. Then Dorine brings about the reason that is
needed for their dilemma. Dorine says to Volere and Mariane, if you ask me, both of you
are mad as mad can be. Do stop this nonsense, now. I've only let you squabble long
enough to let you see where it would get you.
Continues for 2 more pages >>




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    tartuffe1 Bibliography LIST OF WORKS CONSULTED Bryson, Scott S. The Chastised Stage. Saratoga: Anma Libri, 1991 Hochman, Stanley (Editor). McGraw-Hill Encyclopedia of World Drama. New York: McGraw-Hill Book Co., 1984 Hodgson, Terry. The Batsford Dictionary of Drama. London: B.T. Batsford 1988 Mander, Gertrud. Moliére. New York: Frederick Unger Publishing, 1973 Sennett, Herbert. Religion and Dramatics. Lanham: University Press of America, 1995 Turnell, Martin. The Classical Moment. London: Hamish