Music in the 15th Century Essay

This essay has a total of 372 words and 2 pages.

Music in the 15th Century



The strongest composers of the fifteenth century were primarily located in the north. So
the best musicians tended to come from countries like France, England, and Germany. Since
Florence was an “international headquarters” it had strong commercial links
with the north. This made it very easy to trade ideas and because of this a new musical
expression made its way to Italy.

The frottola was a popular form of music that was primarily developed in Florence. It was
a setting of an entertaining or sentimental poem for three or four parts. These parts
were handed out to a singer and either three or four musicians. The frottola was written
to perform in upper-class groups and had a folk-like quality to it. The gradual diffusion
of frottole gave Italy a good reputation for simple melody and clear dynamic expression.

The canto carnascialesco (carnival song) was a distinctively Florentine form of the
frottola. These songs were written to sing during the carnival season before Lent and
were very popular. When Savonarola came to power, the carnivals were banished because of
their suspected recklessness. With this the songs disappeared too. After the passing of
Savonarola, the songs were brought back, but didn’t survive in the sixteenth
century.

Continues for 1 more page >>




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