Nazi Art Essay

This essay has a total of 2066 words and 9 pages.

Nazi Art



Many people know that Adolph Hitler was an artist in his youth as an Austrian, but just how
much art played a role in the National Socialist Germany seems to get underrated in the history
books. Just as a racial war was waged against the Jewish population and the military fought the
French and the Slavic people, an artistic cleansing for the Germanic culture was in progress.
Special Nazi units were searching the ancient arts of antiquity for evidence of a great Germanic
race that existed well before history. Hitler had monuments and museums built on a grand scale
with carefully designed architecture that would last a thousand years. Art of this nature was a
priority because Hitler wanted to capture Chronos, not Gaea. He wanted to dominate the rest of
time, not the limits of Earth.

Hitler was born and raised in the town of Linz. As a youth he studied art, primarily as a painter
capturing mostly the surrounding Alpine Mountain landscapes that he grew up with, but he also
had an interest in architecture. When he turned eighteen he applied to the Vienna Art Academy,
and was rejected. Along with art, Hitler was fascinated with Linz, Antiquity, and Wagner. It was at
this time in his youth that Hitler and his friend, Kubicheck would try to finish an opera that
Wagner had abandoned. This opera was about a leader trying to establish the Roman Empire by
overthrowing the Papal government in Rome. Hitler would remember "It was in that hour it all
began."1

Hitler thought of Wagner and art as the basis for a new government, nation, and people. It is
not just coincidence that he would be surrounded by National Socialist leaders with background
in the arts. Joseph Gobbels, the Minister of Propaganda and head of the Reich Chamber of
Culture, was an experienced writer and aspiring poet. Rosenberg was a painter and Von Sherot
wrote poetry. Hans Frederick Munch of the Reich's Chamber of Literature said "This government
born out of opposition to rationalism knows the peoples inner longings and dreams, which only
the artist can give them."2 Less than three months after coming to power, the Nazis issued
"What German artists expect of their new government" in March of 1933. One of the first projects
of the Nazi regime was the House of German Art (Haus der Deutschen Kunst), a large museum.
Quickly the Third Reich was forming it's own style of art, as identifiable as Soviet "Social-
Realism", but symbolizing the national and racial policies. And while the Soviets tended to
emphasize Literature, the Nazis focused on Visual art and Architecture. Nazi art was Neo-
Classical with a twist of German romanticism, heroicism, and nostalgia for the times of yore.3

In the beginning there was debate on what exactly the Nazis were looking for in art. It is well
known that the Third Reich was extremely hostile to Avant-Garde artists, but before the Nazis
came to power, Joseph Goebbels took to the opinion that some German Expressionists were
compatible with National Socialist ideas. These artists include Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Erich
Heckel, Karl Schmidt-Rottluff, Ernst Barlach, and Emil Nolde. Nolde was even a Nazi party
member, but these artists could hardly be called "Nazi artists". They declared nationalism and
were very anti-capitalist. The Expressionists promoted sensation and passion over rational logic
and were heavily into primitive German culture. Hitler, Alfred Rosenberg, and other senior
Nazis attacked these modern artists as incompatible with the Nazi ideal because of there strong
opposition to authoritarianism and the individualism expressed within their work.4 Albert Speer,
commissioned to decorate Goebbels home would later write: "I borrowed a few watercolours from
... the director of the Berlin Nationalgalerie. Goebbels and his wife were delighted with the
paintings---until Hitler came to inspect, and expressed his severe disapproval. Then the minister
summoned me immediately. 'The pictures will have to go at once; they're simply impossible'."5
Upon the assumption of power, almost all modern art was attacked and artists of all sorts fled the
country as work was confiscated and art schools were closed.

There are many reasons Hitler attacked modern art. Such groups as the Dadaists and the
Bauhaus had close connections with the Soviet schools of Constructivism and Suprematism.
These groups, while not necessarily Communist, were overly leftist ranging the gauntlet from
Socialism to Anarchism and was extremely anti-military. Hitler also attacked the aesthetics of
modern art. The Bauhaus was ultra-modern and cosmopolitan in it's designs. It's creations were
seamless global industrial works that lacked a recognizable element of German tradition and
craft. And other movements such as Cubism and Expressionism that distorted the picture to
analyze colour, shape and space, Hitler found to be an example of the "Degeneration" of culture
and race. On the day of the German Arts Festival in 1937, Hitler opened a dual exhibition to
commemorate the House of German Art, One of Nazi approved art called the Great German Art
Exhibition (Grosse Deutsch Kunstausstellung) and another exhibition of Degenerate Art
(Entartete Kunst).

"From the pictures sent in for exhibition, it is clear that the eye of some men shows them things
other than they are---that there are men who on principle feel meadows to be blue, heavens
green, the clouds sulfur yellow. Either these 'artists' do really see things in this way and believe
that in which they represent---then one has to ask how the defect in vision arose, and if it is
hereditary the Minister of the Interior will have to see it that so ghastly a defect shall not be
allowed to perpetuate itself---or, if they do not believe in the reality of such impressions but seek
on other grounds to impose them upon the nation, then it is a matter for the criminal court." Hitler
stated on the House of German Art's inauguration.6 This connection of degenerate art and
physical disability was best linked by Paul Schults-Naumberg's book, Art and Race published in
1928. This book paired up modern paintings and sculpture with photographs of diseased and
misshapen people. A film was made in 1936 on this principle and shown in almost every city.

This brings forth the question of what Nazi approved artwork was. Goebbels ordered "racially
conscious" art that was "within the limits prescribed, not by any artistic idea, but by the political
idea."7 The Nazi art had to represent Nazi ideas such as the Aryan body, healthy and beautiful.
The male would be strong and active, a superman, either a warrior, proud and heroic reaping
victory after victory or participating in sport and shaping the body for battle in a friendly
competition that would help shape his opponent preparing him for the same battle. And the
female would be the lovely Nordic superwoman, a mother to birth and teach a generation of men
for work and battle. Another popular theme in Nazi art was the German landscape. Hitler was
very fond of the snow covered peaks of the Alps, but the portrait and genre paintings are of more
political and historical significance.
Continues for 5 more pages >>




  • Amish Culture
    Amish Culture The past five weeks in my life have really had an impact on me. In such a short period of time, I have become more aware of the different cultures that exist around the world today. We tend to think that our way of life is the only way there is, or at least the only right way. It is really very ignorant to think that everyone believes and behaves the same way. People should stop being so self-centered and take notice and interest in cultural diversity. There are numerous different
  • Entrepreneurial Adventure
    Entrepreneurial Adventure Entrepreneurial Adventure: The Development of Economics in The United States “Capitalism came in the first ships.” -Carl N. Degler Barit Brown United States History Saturday, March 18, 2000 4,753 words The United States was a nation of development. It was a nation of growth and of innovation. From the signing of the Declaration of Independence, to the end of World War II and so forth, complex dilemmas called for complex solutions and complex solutions called for innovat
  • Great Depression1
    Great Depression1 The Great Depression was the worst economic decline ever in U.S. history. It began in late 1929 and lasted about a decade. Throughout the 1920’s, many factors played a role in bringing about the depression; the main causes were the unequal distribution of wealth and extensive stock market speculation. Money was distributed unequally between the rich and the middle-class, between industry and agriculture within the United States, and between the U.S. and Europe. This disproporti
  • Great Depression1
    Great Depression1 The Great Depression was the worst economic decline ever in U.S. history. It began in late 1929 and lasted about a decade. Throughout the 1920’s, many factors played a role in bringing about the depression; the main causes were the unequal distribution of wealth and extensive stock market speculation. Money was distributed unequally between the rich and the middle-class, between industry and agriculture within the United States, and between the U.S. and Europe. This disproporti
  • The Civil War
    The Civil War For minorities, as for other Americans, the Civil War was an opportunity to prove their valor and loyalty. Among the first mustered into the Union Army were a De Kalb regiment of German American clerks, the Garibakdi Guards made up of Italian Americans, a "Polish Legion," and hundreds of Irish American youths form Boston and New York. But in Ohio and Washington, D.C., African American volunteers were turned away from recruiting stations and told, "This is a white man\'s war." Some
  • The Civil War
    The Civil War For minorities, as for other Americans, the Civil War was an opportunity to prove their valor and loyalty. Among the first mustered into the Union Army were a De Kalb regiment of German American clerks, the Garibakdi Guards made up of Italian Americans, a "Polish Legion," and hundreds of Irish American youths form Boston and New York. But in Ohio and Washington, D.C., African American volunteers were turned away from recruiting stations and told, "This is a white man\'s war." Some
  • The Nineteenth Century
    The Nineteenth Century The Nineteenth Century American The Nineteenth Century American was very different than the Twentieth Century American. They had different technology, food, laws, dress, customs, view of art and beauty, and family structure. They lived a lot differently than we do and they acted differently, also. They liked different things, and had different customs, also. They spoke English, but used different words and words had different meanings. The Nineteenth Century American ate m
  • Washington irving
    washington irving Irving, Washington (1783-1859), American writer, the first American author to achieve international renown, who created the fictional characters Rip Van Winkle and Ichabod Crane. The critical acceptance and enduring popularity of Irving\'s tales involving these characters proved the effectiveness of the as an American literary form. Born in New York City, Irving studied law at private schools. After serving in several law offices and traveling in Europe for his health from 1804
  • The American Indian Genocide
    The American Indian Genocide The American Indian Genocide Textbooks and movies are still hiding the genocide of Native American Indian cultures, which began five centuries ago. There were many friendly and close relationships between early immigrant settlers and native peoples, but these were not the main current in their relations. U.S. history is destroyed by acts of genocide against native people, made worse by the deadly impact of new diseases spread by contact between new settlers and nativ
  • Frank Lloyd Wright
    Frank Lloyd Wright Frank Lloyd Wright was born as Frank Lincoln Wright on June 8, 1867. He was born in Richland Center, which is in southern Wisconsin. His father, William Carey Wright, was a musician and a preacher. His mother, Anna Lloyd-Jones was a teacher. It is said that his mother placed pictures of great buildings in young Frank’s nursery as part of training him up from the earliest possible moment to be an architect. Wright spent some time growing up on a farm owned by his uncle, which w
  • Aaron Douglas
    Aaron Douglas Aaron Douglas People may ask, what other than a tornado can come out of Kansas? Well, Aaron Douglas was born of May 26, 1899 in Topeka, Kansas. Aaron Douglas was a "Pioneering Africanist" artist who led the way in using African- oriented imagery in visual art during the Harlem Renaissance of 1919- 1929. His work has been credited as the catalyst for the genre incorporating themes in form and style that affirm the validity of the black consciousness and experience in America. His pa
  • Aaron Douglas
    Aaron Douglas Aaron Douglas People may ask, what other than a tornado can come out of Kansas? Well, Aaron Douglas was born of May 26, 1899 in Topeka, Kansas. Aaron Douglas was a "Pioneering Africanist" artist who led the way in using African- oriented imagery in visual art during the Harlem Renaissance of 1919- 1929. His work has been credited as the catalyst for the genre incorporating themes in form and style that affirm the validity of the black consciousness and experience in America. His pa
  • Alberto Giacometti
    Alberto Giacometti His purpose was to express the “totality of life” and “find the real through external experiences”. He was celebrated for his elongated figures that followed his break from the surrealists. But, who was Alberto Giacometti? Alberto Giacometti was born in 1901 in the Italian speaking town Borgonova, Switzerland. Being the son of Giovanni Giacometti, an impressionist painter, he was encouraged in art at an early age. Giacometti had great confidence in his drafting ability at the
  • Albrecht durer
    albrecht durer Albrecht Durer was born in Nurembourg in May 21, 1471. His father, Albrecht Durer was a goldsmith, he had come from Germany to Nurembourg in 1455 and married Barbara Holper. Barbara\'s father was Albrecht\'s master. Albrecht was his father\'s third son. He was named Albrecht because of a family tradition which he has been the third representative so far. Albrecht had three brothers named Laszlo, Albrecht, and Ajtos. Albrecht was apprenticed to his father at the age of 13. His fath
  • Albrecht durer
    albrecht durer Albrecht Durer was born in Nurembourg in May 21, 1471. His father, Albrecht Durer was a goldsmith, he had come from Germany to Nurembourg in 1455 and married Barbara Holper. Barbara\'s father was Albrecht\'s master. Albrecht was his father\'s third son. He was named Albrecht because of a family tradition which he has been the third representative so far. Albrecht had three brothers named Laszlo, Albrecht, and Ajtos. Albrecht was apprenticed to his father at the age of 13. His fath
  • Analysis of Albert Bierdstats Among the Sierra Nev
    Analysis of Albert Bierdstats Among the Sierra Nevada Mountains in California Albert Bierstadt’s Among the Sierra Nevada Mountains in California is a scenic canvas oil painting on display at the National Museum of American Art in Washington, DC. Created in 1868, this enormous painting is approximately six by ten feet in size (Honour and Fleming, 2000). The subject matter of this piece is typical of Bierstadt, who is known for his detailed landscapes, especially those of the Rockies and Sierras o
  • Andy Warhol Father of Pop
    Andy Warhol Father of Pop Andy Warhol: The Father of Pop Art Andy Warhol has spewed forth in many examples of the modern style that is known as "Pop art," in various mediums -spanning from silkscreen to a cable network. Not only has Warhol greatly contributed to this revolutionary style, but also in many ways, he has created it. Andy Warhol\'s style was certainly part of the select first that were even labeled as "Pop." Warhol had also used the media, which captured his eccentricities, to his ad
  • Ayasofya
    ayasofya Architecture, the practice of building design and its resulting products; customary usage refers only to those designs and structures that are culturally significant. Architecture is to building as literature is to the printed word. Vitruvius, a 1st-century BC Roman, wrote encyclopedically about architecture, and the English poet Sir Henry Wotton was quoting him in his charmingly phrased dictum: "Well building hath three conditions: Commoditie, Firmenes, and Delight." More prosaically,
  • Botticelli and His Portrayal of Women
    Botticelli and His Portrayal of Women Botticelli is one of the most famous artists during the Italian Renaissance. He was very well know for the portrayal of the female figure and his ability to incorporate femininity as a symbol of life itself and/or nature illustrated by the changes of seasons. Botticelli most famous figure was that of Venus, the goddess of love. She was incorporated into two of his most famous works, The Birth of Venus and Primavera. Most of Botticelli’s women had that typica
  • Botticellis Allegory of Spring
    Botticellis Allegory of Spring Botticelli’s Allegory of Spring The renaissance was a time of wonderful art, though one artist in particular stood out, that was Sandro Botticelli. This man created some of the most renowned pieces of art in European history; one great painting was Allegory of Spring. This mythological artwork was an amazing change from the normalcy of past times. Botticelli’s Allegory of Spring, painted in 1482, is one of the most remarkable and astounding pieces of renaissance ar
  • Destroyed Place
    Destroyed Place Paul Klee is a famous Surrealist painter, regarded by the Nazis as a degenerate artist. Born on December 18, 1879, in Munchenbuchsee near Bern, Switzerland, Klee enters the most prestigious art school in Germany, the Munich Academy, at the age of 21. Shortly thereafter, he moves to Munich and travels throughout Europe studying impressionist artwork and incorporating color into his work far more than in previous years. In 1910 he gets his own private exhibition in Bern, and from t
  • Gothic Art
    Gothic Art Gothic Sculpture In the Gothic period, remarkable sculpture was produced in France, Germany, and Italy. As in Romanesque times, much of it was made in conjunction with church architecture, although sculptured figures are also found on tombs, pulpits, and other church furnishings. France The great cathedral at Chartres exemplifies the stylistic evolution of the Gothic, which can be traced in viewing its portals. Its west entrance, the earliest, built in the mid-12th century, displays r
  • Kathe kolwitz
    kathe kolwitz The Culture That Shaped Kollwitz German born Kathe Kollwitz was brought up in an environment of great political and religious significance. Her father a socialist and her grandfather a independent minister who was expelled from the church. Kollwitz’s father quickly recognised her skill for drawing and offered encouragement towards artistic pursuits. Kathe Kollwitz married at 23 to a doctor by the name of Karl Kollwitz.The couple lived in a working class district of Berlin for most
  • Nam June Paik Video Innovations
    Nam June Paik Video Innovations Nam June Paik was born in Seoul, Korea on July 20, 1932. He was the fifth and youngest child of a textile merchant. In 1947, at the age of 14, he studied piano and composition with two of Korea\'s foremost composers. The family moved to Tokyo, Japan in 1950 to avoid the havoc of the Korean War. Paik studied music, history, art history, and philosophy at the University of Tokyo from 1953 to 1956. He did his graduate dissertation on Schoenberg. In 1956, he moved to
  • Nazi art as propaganda
    nazi art as propaganda Nazi Germany regulated and controlled the art produced between 1933 and 1945 to ensure they embodied the values they wished to indoctrinate into the German people. The notion of ‘volk’ (people) and ‘blut und boden’ (soil and blood) was championed in paintings to glorify an idealized rural Germany and instill a sense of ‘superiority’ in the Nordic physicality. Highly veristic and asthetisized works romanticized everyday subjects and reiterated redundant stereotyped Nazi ide
  • NorcrossVivaldi
    NorcrossVivaldi The Fitchburg Art Museum is currently celebrating its 75th anniversary. For the first time in this museum’s history, there is a gallery reflecting it’s founder’s passions. The art that is now on exhibit is that of Eleanor Norcross. These pieces are from Norcross’s own collection and long term loans from museums and private collections. This is one of the exhibits that launches a look at pioneering American artists of the 19th century. Norcross’s exhibit is titled, “ Norcross: Cha
  • Oskar Kokoschka
    Oskar Kokoschka Oskar Kokoschka Kokoschka was born in Pchlarn, a Danube town, on March 1, 1886. He studied at the Vienna School of Arts and Crafts from 1905 to 1908. As an early exponent of the avant-garde expressionist movement, he began to paint psychologically penetrating portraits of Viennese physicians, architects, and artists. Among these works are Hans Tietze and Erica Tietze-Conrat (1909, Museum of Modern Art, New York City), August Forel (1910, Mannheim Art Gallery, Germany), and Self-
  • Panofskys views on Van Eyck
    Panofskys views on Van Eyck Panofsky’s purpose in writing this article was to identify a painting discovered in Brussels in 1815 (referred to as the “London portrait”) as the portrait of Geovanni Arnolfimi and his wife Jeanne de Cename, painted in 1434. Panofsky uses historical documentation and iconography to prove his point. Because a painting’s value can be enhanced by its historical significance, it is important to discover its background. Identifying a painting from several centuries ago is
  • Paul klee
    paul klee A Swiss-born painter and graphic artist whose personal, often gently humorous works are replete with allusions to dreams, music, and poetry, Paul Klee, b. Dec. 18, 1879, d. June 29, 1940, is difficult to classify. Primitive art, surrealism, cubism, and children\'s art all seem blended into his small-scale, delicate paintings, watercolors, and drawings. His family was very interested in the arts. The jobs that Paul\'s parents had were strange for 1879. His mom helped support the family
  • Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra
    Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra founded in 1895, gave its first concert the following year under the direction of Frederic Archer. Victor Herbert was the chief conductor from 1898 to 1904; he was succeeded by Emil Paur (1904–10). The orchestra was then disbanded. It was revived in 1926, and over the next decade it was led by Elias Breeskin (1927–30) and Antonio Modarelli (1930–37). The orchestra was reorganized by Otto Klemperer in 1937. Fritz Reiner was chief conduct
  • Should Frank Lloyd Wright
    Should Frank Lloyd Wright Natalie DeFrancesco Class 02 Frank Lloyd Wright 12/4/1999 Bibliography Frank Lloyd Wright was born on June 8th, 1867 in Wisconsin. His heritage was Welsh. His father’s name was William Carey Wright; his occupation was a musician and a preacher of his faith, Unitarian. His mother’s name was Anna Lloyd Jones; her occupation was a schoolteacher. It was said that his mother placed pictures of great buildings on the walls of his nursery in order to train him to become an arc
  • The Bauhaus Notes
    The Bauhaus Notes Architecturearchitecture When Walter Gropius resigned as the head of the Bauhaus in 1930, Ludwig Mies Van Der Rohe (1886-1969) became its director, moving it to Berlin before political pressures forced it to close in 1933. In his architecture and furniture he made a clear and elegant statement of the International Style, so much so that his work had enormous influence on modern architecture. Taking his motto "less is more" and calling his architecture "skin and bones," his aest
  • The shackles of socialist realism
    the shackles of socialist realism The civil strife and chaos that had torn Russia limb from limb in the early 20th Century, although brutally devastating, did not hail the end of the stability and power that had characterized the massive country for so much of history. The continuing strength of what was now the Soviet Union lay in the newly formed support structure provided by Socialist Realism, a force that directed the awareness of, and the arts produced by, the Soviet people. The ideals of S
  • Titian
    Titian Titian No one knows exactly when the Italian artist, Tiziano Vecellio, was born. Over the centuries, there has been a great deal of confusion concerning the date, due to a misprint in his biography by sixteenth century art historian, Girgio Vasari. Vasari recorded the date as 1480, but the progress of Tiziano Vecellio’s work, as well as other documented sources, announce his date of birth to be sometime between 1488 and 1490. (Magill 2310) The place of his birth was Pieve de Cadore, in th
  • Titians altarpieces in the church of the Frari Ven
    Titians altarpieces in the church of the Frari Venice Titian’s Pesaro and Assunta. Altarpieces in the church of the Frari, Venice. What was the importance of these two altarpieces for the development of painting in Venice, both from a stylistic and iconographic point of view? It has been said that Titian’s Assunta, which adorns the high altar, and Pesaro (on the left aisle of the chapel of the Immaculate Conception) stand mid-way between the past and the future of Venetian painting. This infers
  • Tycho Brahe
    Tycho Brahe Tycho Brahe Tyge (Latinized as Tycho) Brahe was born on 14 December 1546 in Skane, then in Denmark, now in Sweden. He was the eldest son of Otto Brahe and Beatte Bille, both from families in the high nobility of Denmark. He was brought up by his paternal uncle Jörgen Brahe and became his heir. He attended the universities of Copenhagen and Leipzig, and then traveled through the German region, studying further at the universities of Wittenberg, Rostock, and Basel. During this period h
  • Development of spy planes
    development of spy planes Development of Spy Aircraft 21 February 2000 Since the beginning of time there has always been conflict and inevitably war. Because of war, it is logical that enemies would seek out information about each other in order to increase their own chances of survival. Reconnaissance would be the proper terminology for gathering this information. There are many ways in which to gather reconnaissance, however I am going to talk about aerial reconnaissance and the use of spy air
  • Adolf Hitler
    Adolf Hitler Hitler’s Childhood Adolf Hitler was born on April 20, 1889, in a small Austrian village called Braunau-am-Inn. Adlof was born a sickly child, his mother, Klara, watched over him night and day. Klara Hitler protected young Adolf from her short-tempered husband, Alois. Adolf grew into a thin, dark-haired, blue-eyed boy with an angular face (Twisted 63). At the age of 6, Hitler started school and showed excellent achievement in his classes. Outside of school young Hitler was energetic
  • Adolf Hitler1
    Adolf Hitler1 ADOLF HITLER Rob Moffitt Mrs. Flinn CP Enlish 10 April 16, 2000 1. Hitler’s Early Life 2. Hitler’s World War I Service 3. Free Corps 4. Weimar Republic 5. German Worker’s Party 6. Munich Putsch 7. Mein Kampf 8. Hitler’s Rise to Power 9. Hitler Launches the War 10. Hitler’s Last Days The interesting life of Adolf Hitler is not fully known to people. Adolf Hitler was born on April 20, 1889, the fourth child of Alois Schickelgruber and Klara Hitler in the Austrian town of Braunau. Two
  • Adolf Hitler
    Adolf Hitler Hitler’s Childhood Adolf Hitler was born on April 20, 1889, in a small Austrian village called Braunau-am-Inn. Adlof was born a sickly child, his mother, Klara, watched over him night and day. Klara Hitler protected young Adolf from her short-tempered husband, Alois. Adolf grew into a thin, dark-haired, blue-eyed boy with an angular face (Twisted 63). At the age of 6, Hitler started school and showed excellent achievement in his classes. Outside of school young Hitler was energetic
  • Adolf Hitler
    Adolf Hitler Hitler’s Childhood Adolf Hitler was born on April 20, 1889, in a small Austrian village called Braunau-am-Inn. Adlof was born a sickly child, his mother, Klara, watched over him night and day. Klara Hitler protected young Adolf from her short-tempered husband, Alois. Adolf grew into a thin, dark-haired, blue-eyed boy with an angular face (Twisted 63). At the age of 6, Hitler started school and showed excellent achievement in his classes. Outside of school young Hitler was energetic
  • Alber Einstein
    Alber Einstein Albert Einstein Albert Einstein was a famous scientist, writer and professor. He was born in Ulm, Germany, on March 24,1879. As a child, Einstein wasn\'t like the other boys: he hated school but loved math. He was shy, and talked very slowly. He didn\'t participate in sports but instead played with mechanical toys, put together jigsaw puzzles, built towers and studied nature. At school and home he would ask many questions and because of that everybody thought he was dumb. Once whe
  • Arnold Schwarzenegger
    Arnold Schwarzenegger ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER Arnold Schwarzenegger was born on July 30,1947, in Thal, Austria. His parents were Aurelia and Gustav Schwarzenegger, and his older brother was Meinhard, who was liked better than Arnold by his father. Arnold\'s family believes he inherited his physique from Karl Schwarzenegger, Arnold\'s grandfather. Arnold\'s father was the head of the German military police during the war years in Belgium. Gustav was legendary for his strict discipline toward Arnold
  • Hemingway
    Hemingway ERNEST HEMINGWAY BIOGRAPHY On the date of July 21, 1899 Ernest Hemingway, a now known brilliant writer, was born. Hemingway was conceivably the only writer to achieve the combination of international celebrity and literary stature in the twentieth century. Hemingway was brought up in the village of Oak Park, Illinois, close to the prairies and woods west of Chicago. Both here and in Michigan, he could explore, camp, fish and hunt with his father, Dr. Clarence Hemingway. In Chicago he w
  • Klimt
    klimt As art nouveau designers erased the barrier between fine arts and applied arts, they applied good design to all aspects of living—from architecture to silverware to painting. In this integrated approach art nouveau had its deepest influence. A variety of ensuing movements continued to explore integrated design, including De Stijl, a Dutch design movement in the 1920s, and the German Bauhaus school in the 1920s and 1930s. Although the stylistic elements of art nouveau evolved into the simpl
  • Life of Hitler
    Life of Hitler On April 30,1945, Adolf Hitler committed suicide in an underground bunker near the center of Berlin. His dream of a Thousand - Year Reich" lay in ruins. German cities had been bombed, German armies captured or destroyed. A week after Hitlers death, Germany offered unconditional surrender to Allied forces. The nightmare of World War 2 in Europe came to an end. Hitler was the only man responsible for the horrors of World War 2. But it was his dream of world domination that possessed
  • Life of picasso
    life of picasso Art represents beauty. It represents the soul and spirit of the artist. It\'s a form of communication that the artist can use as a substitution for words. Art has flourished the world for thousands of years and it has no intentions on stopping. One of "the most important figure\'s in modern art" (Selfridge, 15) is a man by the name of Pablo Picasso. He has taken the world into many places and has enabled us to see many abstract creations through his artwork alone. (Selfridge, 20)
  • Margaret BoukeWhite
    Margaret BoukeWhite Margaret Bourke- White Margaret Bourke- White never thought she would be a famous photographer. In 1921, when Margaret was 17, she went to college to study herpetology, or the study of snakes and reptiles. That same year her father died leaving her family with little money. To stay in college Margaret got a job taking and selling pictures of the college campus using her father’s broken camera. That summer she got a job as the photographer and counselor at a summer camp. Even
  • Maxfield Parrish
    Maxfield Parrish Maxfield Parrish, born Frederick Parrish, was one of the greatest illustrators of his time, ranking among top artists Van Gogh and Paul Cézanne. From his day of birth July 25th 1870 in Philadelphia, to the day he died in 1966 at the age of 95 in Cornish, Parrish lived a full wealthy life without many disappointments or sorrows in what was called the Golden Age of Illustration. Parrish’s works will be forever remembered as enchanting realistic paintings of fantasy and romance tha
  • Mother Teresa
    Mother Teresa Mother Teresa was a wonderful woman and a great influence on the world today. She was born in 1910 in Macedonia with the name Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu. She was born into a family of deeply religious Catholics. Agnes felt she got the calling to work for God at the young age of fourteen. She joined the Loreto order and went to Bengal, India, to start her studies. In 1937, Agnes took her final vows to become a nun and has done much great work in the world since. Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu was