Notre Dame

This essay has a total of 285 words and 2 pages.

Notre Dame

Notre Dame


Notre Dame is a cathedral. The word cathedral comes from the Latin word
cathedra, which is the name that was given to the throne was called where the
bishop sat in his church. The cathedral was the house of God and the seat of
the bishop. The bishop is the powerfull leader of the church and the church
rules the land. Cathedrals were a sign of both economic prosperity and faith.

Building Notre Dame required a great deal of things, such as skilled
builders, millions of tons of stone, many workers, powerful leadership, and
above all else, lots of money. Most of the money, at first, came from came from
the middle class people, but kings and rich merchants ended up spending the most
on the project.

The man in charge of building was called the master builder. The people
under him were the master craftsmen, the manuel laborors, loaders, and piece
workers. For these workers, a day of hard work was worth about 2 or 3 loaves of
bread.

The stone used to build Notre Dame was gotten by digging in the ground for
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