Ode To A Nightingale

This essay has a total of 657 words and 3 pages.

Ode To A Nightingale

Ode to a Nightingale
In Ode to a Nightingale, John Keats, the author and narrator, used descript
terminology to express the deep-rooted pain he was suffering during his battle
with tuberculosis. This poem has eight paragraphs or verses of ten lines each
and doesn't follow any specific rhyme scheme. In the first paragraph, Keats gave
away the mood of the whole poem with his metaphors for his emotional and
physical sufferings, for example: My heart aches, and drowsy numbness pains
My sense (1-2) Keats then went on to explain to the reader that he was speaking
to the "light-winged Dryad" in the poem.
This bird symbolizes a Nightingale that to many, depicts the happiness
and vibrance of life with the way it seems to gracefully hover over brightly
colored flowers to get nectar but, to Keats death, because his was becoming.
"Shadows numberless" at the end of the paragraph signifies the angel of death
and spirits that had surrounded Keats. Keats vividly and beautifully described
wine: … for a beaker full of the warm South… With beaded bubbles winking at
the brim, And purple stained mouth; That I might drink, and leave the he used
to bury his fears and emotions about death.
In verse three, Keats expressed that most people enjoy a full life and die
old, when he pens: Here, men sit and hear each other groan; …last gray hairs,
Where youth grows pale, and spectre-thin, and dies… (24-26) He felt that youth
was a time in one's life to enjoy.
Continues for 2 more pages >>




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