Palazzo Ruccelai Essay

This essay has a total of 535 words and 3 pages.

Palazzo Ruccelai




The Palazzo Ruccelai was one of the first works by Leon Battista Alberti. He was an
Italian architect, architectural theorist, and universal genius. Albert was the most
important early Renaissance architect after Filippo Brunelleschi (Gympel, 44).

The "Palazzo" originated in Florence. The monumental private building is derived from
"palatium." This Latin word comes from the Roman hill which Emperor Augustus and his
successors lived. During the 13th and 14th centuries, many of Italian towns were
destroyed during the power struggles. This explains why the exterior of the Early
Renaissance palaces were dark, defensive, raw and uninvited (Gympel, 44).

Construction on the Palazzo Ruccelai began somewhere between 1455 and 1460. Leon Batista
Alberti designed the original Palace to have five bays, the center being where the door
was located. Later on, two more bays were added by someone else (class notes 1/19/00).
There are three stories on this building. Each story is equal in height and rustication
is uniform. This "evenness" is what gives the Renaissance its name. Most buildings made
at this time have similar attributes.

Each story has its own column capital to it. The ground floor has the Tucson order, the
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