Philadelphia

This essay has a total of 506 words and 2 pages.

Philadelphia

This movie caused a lot of hoopla when it was released back in '93, for it was the first
Hollywood studio movie to fully tackle the subject of AIDS. Now, I don't want to take
anything away from the film, because it is still quite entertaining, but it certainly
doesn't come off as a groundbreaking film anymore. Even back when it was released, I
personally didn't think it was that big of a deal because by that time we'd already seen
the subject matter covered for years, in news reports, documentaries and independent
films; so when PHILADELPHIA finally came along, it seemed like it was just a little
overdue… What the film does succeed in doing is taking a deep look at a new kind of
discrimination that grew as AIDS became more prevalent in the minds of the general public
and how some people's hatred towards gays got even more fueled as this new disease became
a harsh and frightening reality in the world. I was a bit surprised to see the quote "An
emotional powerhouse!" on the back cover of the DVD because as it does have its share of
emotional scenes, they're far from overwhelming and it isn't likely that that is what
you'll take away from it in the end. The most memorable, powerful scenes, in fact, are
those awkward moments that are examined as we see how people around Andrew react upon
learning of his illness - the most famous ones being Washington's reaction to Hanks in his
office and the confrontation in the public library between Hanks and an employee there.
Demme also does an admirable job in making the City of Brotherly Love a real presence in
the movie. The opening credit sequence is a beautiful montage of all the great sights of
the city and its people, giving us a real sense of the metropolis. From the rich
neighborhoods to the slums, from the working class to the homeless sleeping on the streets
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