Priest And Chaplain Essay

This essay has a total of 473 words and 4 pages.

Priest And Chaplain


The characters of the chaplain, in Albert Camus' The Outsider,

and the priest, in Franz Kafka's The Trial, are quite similar, and are

pivotal to the development of the novel. These characters serve

essentialy to bring the question of God and religion to probe the

existentialist aspects of it, in novels completely devoid of religious

context.

The main idea visible about these two characters is that they

are both the last ones seen by the protagonists, Mearsault and K., both

non-believers in the word of the lord. Whereas the chaplain in The

Outsider tries to make Mearsault believe in the existence of god, the

priest tries to warn and explain to K. what will happen to him.

The reason the chaplain is the last one to see Mearsault is

becasue it's his job to let the prisioners have a final shot at

redemption before they are executed. The reason that K. meets with the

priest is out of advice given to him by someone, and he is the last

character that he shows K. interacting with (although it might be true

that K. meets and interacts with other people after the meeting, but

they are neither mentioned nor visible later on). The priest doesn't try

and make K. confess or anything of the sort, he is mainly there to

converse with the character, his religious position is almost put to no

use.

Continues for 2 more pages >>




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