Rachel Carson Essay

This essay has a total of 865 words and 4 pages.

Rachel Carson



Rachel Carson
Hello, my name is Rachel Lousie Carson. I was born on a farm in Springdale,
Pennsylvania on May 27, 1907. My mother, Maria McLean Carson was a dedicated
teacher and throughout my childhood she encouraged my interests in nature and in
writing. She also encouraged me to publish my first story A Battle in the Clouds in the St.
Nicholas magazine while I was in fourth grade.
After graduating from Parnassus High School, I enrolled into the Pennsylvania
College for Women. I majored in English and continued to write but I also had to take
two semesters of science, which changed my life. In my junior year I changed my major to
zoology, even though science was not considered an appropriate avenue for women.
After graduating college in 1928 I had earned a full one year scholarship to Johns
Hopkins University in Baltimore. This scholarship did not relieve me or my family of our
financial burdens, so I worked throughout graduate school in the genetics department
assisting Dr. Raymond Pearl and Dr. H.S. Jennings and I worked as an assistant teacher in
the zoology department at the University of Maryland. In 1932 I received my masters in
marine zoology. I continued working part-time as a teacher after graduating to help
support my family through the early years of the Depression. In 1935 my father had a
heart attack and passed away leaving me to provide for my mother. In 1936, my sister
Marion passed away at the age of forty leaving behind two young daughters, and my
mother encouraged me to take them in. That same year I took the civil service
examination necessary for promotion to full-time junior aquatic biologist. I scored higher
than all the other candidates ( who were all male) and became the first female biologist
ever hired by the Bureau of Fisheries whom I was employed by for sixteen years as a
writer.
My article entitled Undersea which had been published in the Atlantic Monthly,
won praise from scientists, naturalists, and literary critics, inspiring me to write my first
book. Under the Sea Wind debuted in 1941 to critical acclaim in both literary and
scientific circles but sales plummeted with the bombing of Pearl Harbor.
1942 I began working for the Fish and Wildlife Service promoting fish as an
alternative to foods in short supply because of the war. By 1948 I moved into an
exclusively male domain, earning the grade of biologist, and becoming the editor-in-chief
of the Information Division. It was not an easy climb though; my close friend and
associate Bob Hines once said I was an able executive with almost a mans administrative
qualities. But it was Hines who also said that my qualities of zest and humor made even
the dull bureaucratic procedure a matter of quite fun.
My second book The Sea Around Us written in 1950 was a book for anyone
who has looked out upon the ocean with wonder. I won the George Westinghouse
Science Writing Award for one chapter of that book entitled The Birth of an Island.
The book itself remained on the New York Times bestseller list for eighty-one weeks.
Marie Rodell decided to re-release my first book at this time and I then had two books on
the best sellers list.
Continues for 2 more pages >>




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