Sir Issac Newton Essay

This essay has a total of 235 words and 2 pages.

Sir Issac Newton



Sir Isaac Newton
English mathematician and physicist
Birth December 25, 1642
Death March 20, 1727
Place of Birth Woolsthorpe, England
Known for Inventing, in part, the branch of mathematics now known as calculus
Formulating the three laws of motion, which describe classical mechanics
Proposing the theory of universal gravitation, which explains that all bodies are affected by the force called gravity
Career 1661 Entered Trinity College, University of Cambridge
1665-1666 Developed what he called the fluxional method (now known as calculus) while
living in seclusion to avoid the plague

1669-1701 Served as Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge
1687 Published his seminal work, Philosphiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica (Mathematical
Principles of Natural Philosophy), which contained his three laws of motion and the theory
of gravitation

1703-1727 Acted as president of the Royal Society, an organization that promotes the natural sciences
1704 Published Opticks (Optics), describing his theory that white light is a blend of different colors
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