Society and its influence on conventionality Essay

This essay has a total of 974 words and 4 pages.

Society and its influence on conventionality



Essay Conventional and Sterile
Tuesday Nov. 07, 2000


It is my understanding that people grow up in a society of conventional and sterile ways
of life. Some societies have a tendency to raise people to be similar in their way of
thinking. People are educated to have the same morals, beliefs (within their own culture),
and, or opportunities at an education. The ways in which these people are raised does not
give a chance for independent thinking, and creativity. My idea of societies being
"Conventional and sterile," is the way that society has influence people, from they day
they were born. Society has a tendency to make people like robots, trapped from
independent thought. People who often wear different clothes, and who have piercing and
tattoos, often stand out from the rest of society. Older generations may frown upon these
ways of "expression," simply because they were taught to think conservatively from the
time they were born. I agree with the statement, "From childhood upwards, everything is
done to make minds of men and women conventional and sterile."

From the time everyone starts school, children are put into grades were everyone is at the
same level of learning, and with people of the same age. "The state is justified in
insisting that children shall be educated" (Essay- Thought and Style, p.141). Russell
explains that society's beliefs linger on the idea that education is important. Children
are expected to get good grades by every parent and a child who do not do well in school,
is seen as one who may not succeed in the future. This relates to the idea that many
people in our society are rased on the same morals, and beliefs. In education, many
students feel as though they are becoming sterile. They are unable to express themselves,
and there are too many boundaries that do not allow them to be creative. One time I heard
a teacher say, "Stick to the guidelines, and nothing too fancy." This implies that people
grow up having their minds conventional and sterile.

People who share the same religious beliefs are taught the same concepts, and grow up
believing certain ideas. As mentioned by Bertrand Russell, "Any questioning of the
received opinion arouses hostility," (Essay- Thought and Style, p.140). Russell is
referring to the idea of the Church against science, how society does not like change. The
Catholic Church denied great innovators such as Galilao (he came up with the idea that the
earth revolves around the sun), but the Church could not accept this idea. People cannot
accept new ideas because it is how they were brought up to believe. Bertrand Russell also
says "interests are bound up with old beliefs" (p.141). People in India don't eat cows
because it's against their religion. "The Thugs of India honestly believe it their duty to
commit murders," (p. 142). Suggesting that they have no morals and values upon which they
were raised on. These kinds of religious, and cultural beliefs make people sterile and
conventional. History dictates many great examples to offer this concept.
Continues for 2 more pages >>




  • American Transcendentalism
    American Transcendentalism American Transcendentalism Transcendentalism as espoused by Ralph Waldo Emerson is essen tially an idealist philosophy, derived from Kant\'s concept of the Tran scendental and opposed to the skepticism of Locke and the Empiricists. In the essay The Transcendentalist, Emerson wrote, "[Kant showed] that there was a very important class of ideas or imperative forms, which do not come by experience, but through which experience was acquired; that these were intuitions of t
  • Philosophy
    philosophy Berkeley\'s Theory of Immaterialism As man progressed through the various stages of evolution, it is assumed that at a certain point he began to ponder the world around him. Of course, these first attempts fell short of being scholarly, probably consisting of a few grunts and snorts at best. As time passed on, though, these ideas persisted and were eventually tackled by the more intellectual, so-called philosophers. Thus, excavation of "the external world" began. As the authoritarinis
  • Philosophy
    philosophy Berkeley\'s Theory of Immaterialism As man progressed through the various stages of evolution, it is assumed that at a certain point he began to ponder the world around him. Of course, these first attempts fell short of being scholarly, probably consisting of a few grunts and snorts at best. As time passed on, though, these ideas persisted and were eventually tackled by the more intellectual, so-called philosophers. Thus, excavation of "the external world" began. As the authoritarinis
  • Descartes3
    descartes3 The Move from Doubt to Certainty; A Look at the Theories of Descartes and Locke Descartes is interested in the certainty of his existence and the existence of other people and things. Descartes beliefs vary from those of Socrates. Descartes argues that knowledge is acquired through awareness and experience. Using this approach, Descartes moves through doubt to certainty of his existence. He asks himself various questions about the certainty of his existence and solves them through cl
  • Empiricism
    Empiricism For a Genuine empiricist the phrase “God Exists” is meaningless To come to a proper understanding of the question, a few key concepts must first be established. What is meant by the term Empiricism? To an empiricist, the occurrence of consciousness is simply the product of experience. It is assumed that all human knowledge is acquired from experience and observation alone. It is believed that we are born with an empty slate; it is through sense perception that our knowledge begins to
  • As man progressed through the various stages of ev
    ph As man progressed through the various stages of evolution, it is assumed that at a certain point he began to ponder the world around him. Of course, these first attempts fell short of being scholarly, probably consisting of a few grunts and snorts at best. As time passed on, though, these ideas persisted and were eventually tackled by the more intellectual, so-called philosophers. Thus, excavation of "the external world" began. As the authoritarinism of the ancients gave way to the more liber
  • Sociocultural factors that influence the direction
    Sociocultural factors that influence the direction of scientific discovery CAN CHANGES BE MADE IN THE GOALS AND PRINCIPLES OF SCIENCE BE EXPLAINED BY THE SOCIO-CULTURAL FACTORS AT WORK DURING THAT TIME? Philosophical analysis and scientific practice: The arguments about these rival ontological and epistemological views cannot be safely left or judged without first looking more closely at the complex relationship between the general analytical interests of philosophers and the more specific intel
  • Greek Roman godstructures
    Greek Roman godstructures Wherever we run across a morality we find an assessment and ranking of human drives and actions. These assessments and rankings always express the needs of a community and herd: whatever profits it in the first place-and in the second and third-is also the supreme measure of the value of all individuals. By means of morality, individuals are led to be functions of the herd and to attribute value to themselves as merely functions…morality is herd instinct in the individ
  • Berkeley
    berkeley As man progressed through the various stages of evolution, it is assumed that at a certain point he began to ponder the world around him. Of course, these first attempts fell short of being scholarly, probably consisting of a few grunts and snorts at best. As time passed on, though, these ideas persisted and were eventually tackled by the more intellectual, so-called philosophers. Thus, excavation of "the external world" began. As the authoritarinism of the ancients gave way to the mor
  • Descartes and Locke
    Descartes and Locke The Move from Doubt to Certainty; A Look at the Theories of Descartes and Locke Descartes is interested in the certainty of his existence and the existence of other people and things. Descartes’ beliefs vary from those of Socrates. Descartes argues that knowledge is acquired through awareness and experience. Using this approach, Descartes moves through doubt to certainty of his existence. He asks himself various questions about the certainty of his existence and solves them
  • Explain the views of Locke
    Explain the views of Locke INTRODUCTION The life-blood of philosophy is argument and counter-argument. Plato and Aristotle thought of this as what they called dialectic discussion. D. W. Hamlyn JOHN LOCKE (1632-1704) Locke was the first of the British empiricists who held that our concepts and our knowledge are based on experience. He forms his system of knowledge with empiricist idioms, namely: all knowledge comes to us through experience. No mans knowledge here can go beyond his experience.
  • Hume2
    hume2 David Hume Knowledge is gained only through experience, and experiences only exist in the mind as individual units of thought. This theory of knowledge belonged to David Hume, a Scottish philosopher. Hume was born on April 26, 1711, as his familys second son. His father died when he was an infant and left his mother to care for him, his older brother, and his sister. David Hume passed through ordinary classes with great success, and found an early love for literature. He lived on his fam
  • Kant1
    kant1 How does one label Kant as a philosopher? Is he a rationalist or an empiricist? Kant makes a distinction between appearances and things in themselves. He also says that things in themselves exist, and that we have no knowledge of things in themselves. This could be labeled "CLOSE TO NONSENSE", but we know Kant better than that. No matter how many laps on the track of metaphysics Kant takes us through, he is still widely held as one of the greatest modern philosophers of our time. Let us e
  • Kant1
    kant1 How does one label Kant as a philosopher? Is he a rationalist or an empiricist? Kant makes a distinction between appearances and things in themselves. He also says that things in themselves exist, and that we have no knowledge of things in themselves. This could be labeled "CLOSE TO NONSENSE", but we know Kant better than that. No matter how many laps on the track of metaphysics Kant takes us through, he is still widely held as one of the greatest modern philosophers of our time. Let us e
  • Leibniz
    Leibniz The Rationalism of Descartes and Leibniz By: Brent Blackman The Rationalism of Descartes and Leibniz Although philosophy rarely alters its direction and mood with sudden swings, there are times when its new concerns and emphases clearly separate it from its immediate past. Such was the case with seventeenth-century Continental rationalism, whose founder was Rene Descartes and whose new program initiated what is called modern philosophy. In a sense, much of what the Continental rationali
  • Make
    make Philosophy When I was born, I did not know the difference between right and wrong. Now, I do. The word philosophy means the love of knowledge. One type of knowledge is propter quid, which ask the question why or how. In this paper, I will demonstrate how Socrates, Hume and Aristotle, three well known philosophers, would explain how I acquired this knowledge in relation to the principles of right and wrong. Socrates is the first philosopher, I will discuss. Since Socrates did not write anyt
  • Pragmatism A truly American Philosophy
    Pragmatism A truly American Philosophy Pragmatism George Santayana described Pragmatism this way, “American pragmatism connects the American experimental and inventive attitude with older philosophical ideas” (Stumpf 397). Pragmatism first appeared in the late nineteenth century, but was only widely accepted after World War II. This philosophy assumed that life has a purpose and that rivals theories about man and the world have to be tested against this purpose. Pragmatism caught on in the Unit
  • Synthetic APriori Proposition
    Synthetic APriori Proposition Are There Synthetic A-Priori Propositions? From a logical point of view, the propositions that express human knowledge can be divided according to two distinctions. First is the distinction between propositions that are a priori, in the sense that they are knowable prior to experience, and those that are a posteriori, in the sense that they are knowable only after experience. Second is the distinction between propositions that are analytic, that is, those in which
  • The Move from Doubt to Certainty A Look
    The Move from Doubt to Certainty A Look The Move from Doubt to Certainty; A Look at the Theories of Descartes and Locke Descartes is interested in the certainty of his existence and the existence of other people and things. Descartes beliefs vary from those of Socrates. Descartes argues that knowledge is acquired through awareness and experience. Using this approach, Descartes moves through doubt to certainty of his existence. He asks himself various questions about the certainty of his existe
  • The Rationalism of Descartes and Leibniz
    The Rationalism of Descartes and Leibniz The Rationalism of Descartes and Leibniz Although philosophy rarely alters its direction and mood with sudden swings, there are times when its new concerns and emphases clearly separate it from its immediate past. Such was the case with seventeenth-century Continental rationalism, whose founder was Rene Descartes and whose new program initiated what is called modern philosophy. In a sense, much of what the Continental rationalists set out to do had alrea
  • The death of Behaviourism
    The death of Behaviourism Is Behaviorism DEAD? Some lovely Obituaries of the leading players in the Psychology of behaviorism. Chris Mullally 741203 Aristotle, 384 BC  322 BC, dead. Man is by nature, a political animal. Of the two great philosophers of Greece, Plato and Aristotle, the latter was the one who relied on observation. In Raphael\'s The School of Athens the two great philosophers in the center of the painting, surrounded by the other great Greeks, with Plato holding his hand uprig
  • Conscience created or innate
    conscience created or innate “Conscience created or innate” To what extent do you think you are dictated by your surroundings and your up-bringing? Do you claim your opinions to be your own? Do you trust your logic and your conscience? These are questions that are seldom asked by ourselves or by others. In fact, these kinds of questions could almost be considered taboo. It seems to be generally accepted that one can trust oneself, one’s authority, and one’s conscience. Upon these premises we se
  • Human Nature And Philosophy
    Human Nature And Philosophy Human Nature Human beings are physical objects, according to Hobbes, sophisticated machines all of whose functions and activities can be described and explained in purely mechanistic terms. Even thought itself, therefore, must be understood as an instance of the physical operation of the human body. Sensation, for example, involves a series of mechanical processes operating within the human nervous system, by means of which the sensible features of material things pro
  • Emotions And The Self
    Emotions And The Self EMOTIONS AND THE SELF Much of the perplexity that motivates modern discussion of the nature of mind derives indirectly from the striking success of physical explanation. Not only has physics itself advanced at a remarkable pace in the last four centuries; every hope has been held out that, in principle, all science can be understood and ultimately studied in terms of mechanisms proper to physics. Seeing all natural phenomena as explicable in terms appropriate to physics, ho
  • History of nature and nurture
    History of nature and nurture Abstract Nature vs. nurture has been discussed by philosophers in the past and by scientists most recently. Philosophers such as Plato argued that all knowledge was inherited through your parent and when you were told something you didn\'t learn it you were just reminded of it. Aristotle however argued that all humans were born with a blank slate and built on it with influence from there environment. In the 1700\'s the empiricists and the internalists took over the
  • Kant and Hobbs
    Kant and Hobbs Historical Background to Kant In order to understand Kant\'s position, we must understand the philosophical background that he was reacting to. First, I will present a brief overview of his predecessor\'s positions with a brief statement of Kant\'s objections, then I will return to a more detailed exposition of Kant\'s arguments. There are two major historical movements in the early modern period of philosophy that had a significant impact on Kant: Empiricism and Rationalism. Kant
  • Hume, David
    Hume, David David Hume Knowledge is gained only through experience, and experiences only exist in the mind as individual units of thought. This theory of knowledge belonged to David Hume, a Scottish philosopher. Hume was born on April 26, 1711, as his family\'s second son. His father died when he was an infant and left his mother to care for him, his older brother, and his sister. David Hume passed through ordinary classes with great success, and found an early love for literature. He lived on h
  • George Berkley
    George Berkley "George Berkeley: Esse Est Percipi?" George Berkeley was an ordained Catholic priest who lived during the 17th century (Price, 206). He wrote some of the most profound works of this time period, which at best, is characterized by the Rationalist and British Empiricist movements. Berkeley was a member of the Empiricists. As a whole, the British Empiricists believed that knowledge is derived from the senses and "sense experience"(Price, 193). Therefore, they believed that no innate
  • Berkeley
    Berkeley Berkeley As man progressed through the various stages of evolution, it is assumed that at a certain point he began to ponder the world around him. Of course, these first attempts fell short of being scholarly, probably consisting of a few grunts and snorts at best. As time passed on, though, these ideas persisted and were eventually tackled by the more intellectual, so-called philosophers. Thus, excavation of the external world began. As the authoritarinism of the ancients gave way to t
  • Descartes
    Descartes Rene\' Descartes, also son of a lawyer, was born in France, 1596. He was one of Europe\'s foremost philosophers and mathematician. He developed one of the most credible explanations of the time in the fields of optics, cosmology, physics, physiology, and biology. Unfortunately after his death his teachings and writings were almost forgotten, overshadowed by the more advanced and modern ideas from Sir Isaac Newton. Despite this Descartes remains one of the most widely read thinkers of a
  • The Move from Doubt to Certainty; A Look at the Th
    The Move from Doubt to Certainty; A Look at the Theories of Descartes and Locke Descartes is interested in the certainty of his existence and the existence of other people and things. Descartes\' beliefs vary from those of Socrates. Descartes argues that knowledge is acquired through awareness and experience. Using this approach, Descartes moves through doubt to certainty of his existence. He asks himself various questions about the certainty of his existence and solves them through clear though
  • Hume
    Hume David Hume Knowledge is gained only through experience, and experiences only exist in the mind as individual units of thought. This theory of knowledge belonged to David Hume, a Scottish philosopher. Hume was born on April 26, 1711, as his family\'s second son. His father died when he was an infant and left his mother to care for him, his older brother, and his sister. David Hume passed through ordinary classes with great success, and found an early love for literature. He lived on his fami
  • The Great Debate - 3 big questions
    The Great Debate - 3 big questions Andrew Ford Philosophy 1st Hour February 13, 2002 Philosophy Book: Chapter 1 Old guys, old rules, old news, right? Wrong. Philosophy is an important subject, because it helps us understand three big questions; "why are we here", "what do we do", and "how do we treat each other". These are important questions to answer because without them we may end up in a situation much like the Taliban is in right now. Complete chaos created from confusion about those three
  • Empiricism
    empiricism Empiricism Empiricism by nature is the belief that there is no knowledge without experience. How can one know what something tastes like if they have never tasted it? For example, would someone know that an apple is red if they have never actually have seen one. Someone can tell you an apple is red, but, if you never have seen one, can you really be sure? Empiricists use three anchor points in which they derive their opinions from. The first of these points is; the only source of genu
  • Empiricism and Behaviorism
    Empiricism and Behaviorism the turn of the twentieth century, the field of Psychology found itself in a war between two contending theoretical perspectives: Gestalt psychology versus Behaviorism. With its roots within the United States, behaviorists in America were developing a theory that believed psychology should not be concerned with the mind or with human consciousness. Instead, behavior and the actions of humans would be the foremost concern of psychologists. Across the Atlantic, Gestalt p
  • Synthetic A-Priori Propositions
    Synthetic A-Priori Propositions Are There Synthetic A-Priori Propositions? From a logical point of view, the propositions that express human knowledge can be divided according to two distinctions. First is the distinction between propositions that are a priori, in the sense that they are knowable prior to experience, and those that are a posteriori, in the sense that they are knowable only after experience. Second is the distinction between propositions that are analytic, that is, those in which
  • Titanic
    Titanic a href= http://www.geocities.com/vaksam/ Sam Vaknin\'s Psychology, Philosophy, Economics and Foreign Affairs Web Sites The film Titanic is riddled with moral dilemmas. In one of the scenes, the owner of Star Line, the shipping company that owned the now-sinking Unsinkable, joins a lowered life-boat. The tortured expression on his face demonstrates that even he experiences more than unease at his own conduct. Prior to the disaster, he instructs the captain to adopt a policy dangerous to t
  • Hume
    Hume David Hume Knowledge is gained only through experience, and experiences only exist in the mind as individual units of thought. This theory of knowledge belonged to David Hume, a Scottish philosopher. Hume was born on April 26, 1711, as his family\'s second son. His father died when he was an infant and left his mother to care for him, his older brother, and his sister. David Hume passed through ordinary classes with great success, and found an early love for literature. He lived on his fami
  • Humanistic Psychology
    Humanistic Psychology Overview: Throughout history many individuals and groups have affirmed the inherent value and dignity of human beings. They have spoken out against ideologies, beliefs and practices, which held people to be merely the means for accomplishing economic and political ends. They have reminded their contemporaries that the purpose of institutions is to serve and advance the freedom and power of their members. In Western civilization we honor the times and places, such as Classic
  • Immanuel Kant
    Immanuel Kant Immanuel Kant 1724-1804 Immanuel Kant was born on April 22, 1724 in Konigsberg, East Prussia. He was the son of a saddler. At age 8, he entered the Collegium Fredericianum, a Latin school, where he remained for 8 1/2 years and studied the classics. He then entered the University of Konigsberg in 1740 to study philosophy, mathematics, and physics. The death of his father halted his university career so he became a private tutor. In 1755, he returned to Konigsburg where he later resu
  • George Berkley
    George Berkley As man progressed through the various stages of evolution, it is assumed that at a certain point he began to ponder the world around him. Of course, these first attempts fell short of being scholarly. As time passed on, though, these ideas persisted and were eventually tackled by the more intellectual, so-called philosophers. This, excavation of quot;the external world quot; began. As the authoritarianism of the ancients gave way to the more liberal views of the modernists, two ma
  • Kukoc
    kukoc What is inborn and what is learned? The discussion as to whether nature or nurture were the driving force shaping our cognitive abilities, was for a long time considered interminable. In the 18th century, Locke and the English empiricists claimed that individuals were born with a tabula rasa and only experience could establish mind, consciousness and the self. On the continent, Leibniz envisaged the self as a monad carrying with it some knowledge of a basic understanding of the world. Unti
  • Hobbes descartes and the science of man
    hobbes descartes and the science of man Hobbes, Descartes and the science of man In this paper I intend to examine the political philosophy of Thomas Hobbes and Rene Descartes, in particular their ideas relating to the science of man, and attempt to explain why their ideas prove that it is not possible to construct a science of man. I will also briefly mention the philosophy of Donald Davidson in regards to a science of man. The theories of Hobbes and the contemporary socio- biologists attempt t
  • Titanic
    Titanic Sam Vaknin\'s Psychology, Philosophy, Economics and Foreign Affairs Web Sites The film "Titanic" is riddled with moral dilemmas. In one of the scenes, the owner of Star Line, the shipping company that owned the now-sinking Unsinkable, joins a lowered life-boat. The tortured expression on his face demonstrates that even he experiences more than unease at his own conduct. Prior to the disaster, he instructs the captain to adopt a policy dangerous to the ship. Indeed, it proves fatal. A com
  • David Abraham
    David Abraham “Grave Offenses” vs. “Tendentious Misconstruals” The David Abraham Case The historical field concerning the Weimar Republic, Germany’s parliamentary government during the interwar years, is not only an extremely sophisticated area of study, but an extremely competitive one as well. In the early eighties, a much heated and unprecedented scholarly dispute arose surrounding The Collapse of the Weimar Republic, written by David Abraham – at the time, a fledgling historian and assistant